1/60 f/2.8 5.8 mm ISO 233

Canon DIGITAL IXUS 60

5.8-17.4 mm

EXIF - See more details

Location

Lat, Lng:  
You can copy the above to your favourite mapping app.
Address:  unknown

 View on map

See also...

Silver Surfers Silver Surfers


Tolerance Tolerance


See more...

Keywords

military
surrender
planning
People
Singapore
Mono
Asia
battle box


Authorizations, license

Visible by: Everyone
All rights reserved

293 visits

Goodbye - 75 years ago

Goodbye - 75 years ago
Today we were reminded that it was exactly 75 years since the surrender of Singapore. Some years ago we visited the restored "Battle Box" (the name for the military headquarters - see note) where the underground bunkers had been refitted as original and with very lifelike mannequins of the military personnel. It felt a little spooky! That's Lieutenant-General Percival on the right, who was forced to surrender the island and nearly two hundred thousand military personnel became war prisoners. Courtesy of the Japanese , a very high proportion died before the armistice. .

Lorenzo Kjell Salmonson, Malik Raoulda, RHH, Rainer Blankermann and 7 other people have particularly liked this photo


23 comments - The latest ones
 Gerard Perin
Gerard Perin
belle reconstitution
3 years ago.
 Bergfex
Bergfex club
A memorial of imperialism.
3 years ago.
 ╰☆☆June☆☆╮
╰☆☆June☆☆╮ club
Good work my friend.
Have a nice evening.
3 years ago.
 GrahamH
GrahamH club
Well remembered in Australia. Posed the possibility of invasion here.
3 years ago. Edited 3 years ago.
tiabunna club
has replied to GrahamH club
Indeed it did, GrahamH.
3 years ago.
 William Sutherland
William Sutherland club
Fabulous capture!

Admired in:
www.ipernity.com/group/tolerance
3 years ago.
 Pam J
Pam J club
And... I can provide my Dad's words from the end of it... in a letter to me years after....

"I had been on Long Range penetration behind Japanese lines for 4 years.... usual survival time was 2 weeks. After 4 years.. I came out the jungle and was put in a ship ready to embark for Singapore... then the A Bomb was dropped just before we weighed anchor. Remember this Pam... for all the horror and the deaths... more lives were saved. Singapore was not going to be taken from the sea.. and tens of thousands would have been massacred . mankind too was given a lesson in that terrible cloud... one that would have been learned later if not then."

My Dad never spoke of the horrors he went through on LRP in Burma .. he would just sometimes speak of the wonderful Indian Sepoys and the camaraderie .. but his was a lonely war in the jungles.

In the same letter to me many years later ... he also said this.

"Fight with all your heart to NEVER let this happen again... fight and resist every legal way you can"

You know.... it feels like the Trenches here in America now.... and this is just the start....

I am resisting... any way I can.

REMEMBER and LEARN.....

Thankyou for the lesson George.. I wish more took it to heart.
3 years ago. Edited 3 years ago.
GrahamH club
has replied to Pam J club
Pam, was your Dad in the Chindits? I've read two books about them and their work. Also have a book by an India-based Aussie RAF pilot who dropped supplies and people to to them and to other behind the lines people, and supplies to communists insurgents in Indochina.
3 years ago.
tiabunna club
has replied to Pam J club
Many thanks indeed for sharing that fascinating information on your father's background and advice, Pam. Yes, sadly I have to agree with you that the next few years could be very bad indeed.

To share my slightly related story on this, I always knew that my great uncle was "lost at sea" in the Pacific but without any details. Doing family research we found he had been sent in the Army as a vehicle mechanic to Singapore. When it fell, some units made it across to Java where they consolidated against the Japanese invasion - he was part. That ended with the Dutch capitulation of the the East Indies and they were sent to Changi.

From Changi he was sent to the Burma railway. In March 1944 after the railway was completed, 7000 surviving Australian POWs were assembled at Tamarkan, Thailand. They were mere skeletons. Nine hundred of the fittest were chosen to be sent to Japan. They were formed into groups and taken by rail to Bangkok and Phnom Phen and then by boat on the Mekong to Saigon Because of the American submarine blockade, shipping from there was considered too dangerous, so they were sent back to Changi for several months.

On the morning of the 4th September 1944 they were taken to the docks where they were loaded onto two freighters. The Rakuyo Maru was to carry the Australians and the Kachidoki Maru was to transport British POWs. The ships also carried rubber and each man was required to carry on board a two foot square block of rubber. The men were then crowded into the stifling hot hold.

On the 12 September 1944 the convoy, of which the Rakuyo Maru was now part, was sighted by the US submarine Sealion ll, which torpedoed her. The Japanese took all the life boats and left the POWs to fend for themselves. The Rakuyo Maru floated for many hours because of the rubber in the holds and some of the men were able to improvise floats. Some were machine gunned in the water by Japanese destroyers which returned to pick up Japanese crew. Somewhat later, the Sealion II surfaced and its crew were surprised to find some surviving Australians - sadly, my great uncle was not among them.

And, to bring this to date, I do not believe that naval exercises in the South China Sea (watch this space...) have anything in the slightest to do with "ensuring freedom of navigation".
3 years ago. Edited 3 years ago.
Pam J club
has replied to GrahamH club
Yes Graham he was....

He was one of Bill Slim's Forgotten Army. He was actually seconded to the Indian Army and thence to LRP .

The book you have is Out of the Blue: Pilot with the Chindits by Terence O'Brien I think ?

I have read it and its on my wish list at Alibris to buy a copy.

I have read several other books too. The things Dad would never speak of....
3 years ago.
Pam J club
has replied to tiabunna club
These are the stories that so NEED to be told loud and clear.

We are one of the last generations that heard these things from those who went through this horror. Our duty is NOT to forget... we canNOT let this happen again

Thankyou George for your piece of the jigsaw puzzle
3 years ago.
GrahamH club
has replied to Pam J club
Mine is "The Moonlight War" by Terence O'Brien, pub William Collins Sons & Co, 1987, ISBN 0-00-217803-6. According to the cover notes this is his second, after the one you mention.

My Dad's contribution was in the test and development area of a factory which made radio and radar gear for the RAN.
3 years ago.
GrahamH club
has replied to Pam J club
A brief story of the Chindits.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chindits
3 years ago.
 Gudrun
Gudrun club
Your photo conveys the oppressive feeling- a sad and dark chapter in history!
3 years ago.
 Rainer Blankermann
Rainer Blankermann club
Thanks for the reminder. he image is a great document! I didn´t know these facts.
3 years ago.
 RHH
RHH club
What a photo and what stories to go with it, George. We've been in Singapore but have not seen this and will have too if we go again.
3 years ago.
 RHH
RHH club
3 years ago.
 RHH
RHH club
Seen in: Silver Surfers
www.ipernity.com/group/605303
3 years ago.
 Malik Raoulda
Malik Raoulda club
C'est mémorable +++++
3 years ago.
 Malik Raoulda
Malik Raoulda club
3 years ago.
 ╰☆☆June☆☆╮
╰☆☆June☆☆╮ club
Your beautiful capture is greatly admired

Historical & Architectural Gems
3 years ago.
 GrahamH
GrahamH club
3 years ago.
 tiabunna
tiabunna club
Thank you, everyone. Mixing history and photography certainly brings different comments and brings out memories.
3 years ago.

Sign-in to write a comment.