40 sec. f/5.6 100.0 mm ISO 6400

RICOH IMAGING COMPANY, LTD. PENTAX K-1

smc PENTAX-FA MACRO 100mm F2.8

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See also...

Milky Way Milky Way


Scene In Scene In


Silver Surfers Silver Surfers


Tolerance Tolerance


Sight and Sound Sight and Sound


Star Trails Star Trails


Pentax Pentax


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Keywords

space
Southern Hemisphere
M41
Orion
NSW
Australia
prime lens
nebula
satellite
stars
sky
SMC Pentax-FA 1:2.8 100mm macro


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Out of this world

Out of this world
Looking north toward Orion and the M42 nebula (those of you in the northern hemisphere usually see this upside down) using the astrotracer in the K-1. This repays viewing large and if you look carefully you will may the traces of no fewer than four satellites (none were visible to the naked eye) - the underlying concern in the film "Gravity" about space junk becomes understandable, even if the science in the film was sometimes questionable. Here's the obvious music (I passed over the version by George Clooney's aunt.:-) ).

Lorenzo Kjell Salmonson, Het broertje van.., Tractacus, Les's Photography AKA aligeeach and 14 other people have particularly liked this photo


20 comments - The latest ones
 Pam J
Pam J club
ABSOLUTELY STUNNING !!!

Was sad to see Gene Cernan died today. We are fast losing our astro heros.
3 years ago.
tiabunna club
has replied to Pam J club
Thank you, Pam. Yes, time and age...
3 years ago.
 Gudrun
Gudrun club
Wow, that's fantastic! 40 seconds and still the stars are perfect- how did you do that? Love the starbursts on the brighter stars and the amazing detail in the large version.
3 years ago.
tiabunna club
has replied to Gudrun club
Thank you, Gudrun. Some of the newer Pentax cameras have a function called "astrotracer". They incorporate a compass and GPS which link to the in-body moving sensor stabilisation to track the stars while on a tripod.
3 years ago.
GrahamH club
has replied to tiabunna club
So the longer the exposure the smaller/narrower the part of the sky recorded?
3 years ago.
tiabunna club
has replied to GrahamH club
The full frame is recorded while the sensor is tracking the sky (though limited to the extent of movement available). What happens when the limit is reached I don't know I'm afraid (and nothing on this in the manual). My guess is that the limit is probably a matter of minutes and then, presumably, the sensor stops and star trails begin (given that the earth is rotating at about 15 degrees/hour).
3 years ago.
GrahamH club
has replied to tiabunna club
OK thanks, did some looking online. I get now that the sensor moves and so that defines the limit.
3 years ago.
 Annemarie
Annemarie club
wonderful this!
3 years ago.
tiabunna club
has replied to Annemarie club
Thank you, Annemarie.
3 years ago.
 Malik Raoulda
Malik Raoulda club
Juste magnifique +++++++
3 years ago.
tiabunna club
has replied to Malik Raoulda club
Thank you, Malik.
3 years ago.
 William Sutherland
William Sutherland club
Excellent capture!

Admired in:
www.ipernity.com/group/tolerance
3 years ago.
tiabunna club
has replied to William Sutherland club
Thank you, William.
3 years ago.
 RHH
RHH club
Excellent night work, George. Tried this the other day and it was a total failure.
3 years ago.
 Tacheles
Tacheles club
That's great. Not often the starry night so crystal clear to admire here owed to pollution with light.
3 years ago.
 RHH
RHH club
3 years ago.
 RHH
RHH club
Seen in: Silver Surfers
www.ipernity.com/group/605303
3 years ago.
 Rita Guimaraes
Rita Guimaraes
A fantastic capture.
Superb.
3 years ago.
 Polyrus
Polyrus
Fascinating to see, but for now I'm concentrating on trying to see sights a bit nearer to home ;-)
3 years ago.
 Amelia Heath
Amelia Heath club
I can't see the satellite traces on my small screen, George, but this starry sky certainly makes up for that. Where we live, even in a village, there is too much light pollution.
3 years ago.

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