Thomas Cranmer's 42 Boxes

Thomas Cranmer's 42 Boxes

Among Götz Kluge's albums  >  The Hunting of the Snark



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From Henry Holiday's illustrations to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark (1876)

The Boojum sitting on some of the 42 boxes

1875: Proposal for a depicton of a Boojum turned Snark by Henry Holiday (and redrawn by me) to Lewis Carroll. However, Carroll (Dodgson) preferred to leave it to the imagination of his readers (and to the imagination of the Barrister) how the Snark may look like. The little vanishig guy is The Baker. Does the Boojum sit on some of the Baker's 42 boxes? It is said that Carroll "suppressed" Holiday's Boojum, but I think that between these two gentlemen that is not the right term. "[...] One of the first th…

The Baker's 42 Boxes

(From Lewis Carroll's and Henry Holiday's The Hunting of the Snark, 1876) · · · · 021 · · There was one who was famed for the number of things · · · · 022 · · · · He forgot when he entered the ship: · · · · 023 · · His umbrella, his watch, all his jewels and rings, · · · · 024 · · · · And the clothes he had bought for the trip. · · · · 025 · · He had forty-two boxes, all carefully packed, · · · · 026 · · · · With his name painted clearly on each: · · · · 027 · · But, since he omitted to mention the fact,…

Holiday - Millais - Anonymous - Galle

The discovery here is the allusion by Henry Holiday to the painting by J.E. Millais. Finding Millais' allusions to an anonymous painter and to Galle's print is a "bycatch" of my Snark hunt. The relation between the anonymous painting and Galle's print already has been explained by Margaret Aston in 1994. That relation brobably has been discovered even earlier by Millais. . [left]: Henry Holiday: Depiction (1876) of the Baker's visit to his uncle in Lewis Carroll's "The Hunting of the Snark" (engraved by J…

Holiday - Millais - Anonymous - Galle

The discovery here is the allusion by Henry Holiday to the painting by J.E. Millais. Finding Millais' allusions to an anonymous painter and to Galle's print is a "bycatch" of my Snark hunt. The relation between the anonymous painting and Galle's print already has been explained by Margaret Aston in 1994. That relation brobably has been discovered even earlier by Millais. . [left]: Henry Holiday: Depiction (1876) of the Baker's visit to his uncle in Lewis Carroll's "The Hunting of the Snark" (engraved by J…

Thomas Cranmer's 42 Boxes

"I personally don't look for secret messages hidden by Carroll in the text; rather, I look at themes and symbols as potential hints as to the sorts of things that were on Carroll's mind at the time." Darien Graham-Smith, 2005-10-05 The image: [B&W]: Upper part of Henry Holiday's illustration (1876) to The Baker's Tale in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark depicting some of the Baker's 42 boxes piled up outside the window. In 1552, shortly before the early death of Edward VI, Thomas Cranmer wrote dow…

42 Boxes meet the Iconoclasts

[left]: Segment (devided) of Henry Holiday's depiction of the Baker's visit to his uncle (1876) in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark (engraved by Joseph Swain). Outside of the window are some of the Baker's 42 boxes. [right]: Anonymous: Segment (two times) of Edward VI and the Pope, An Allegory of Reformation, mirrored view (16th century). Iconoclasm depicted in the window. Under the window (see below) is Thomas Cranmer who wrote the 42 Articles in 1552. In The King's Bedpost: Reformation and Iconog…

42 Boxes, Sheep, Iconoclasm

[left]: Segment from Henry Holiday's depiction of the Baker's visit to his uncle (1876) in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark. Outside of the window are some of the Baker's 42 boxes. [center]: Segment from John Everett Millais: Christ in the House of His Parents (1850). [right]: segment from Edward VI and the Pope, An Allegory of Reformation, mirrored view (Anonymous, 16th century); depiction of iconoclasm. In The King's Bedpost: Reformation and Iconography in a Tudor Group Portrait (1994, p. 72), t…

Thomas Cramer's hand?

From an illustration by Henry Holiday to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark (1876). The shown structure could be a fire. Who knows?
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