Götz Kluge

Götz Kluge

Posted on 06/30/2013


Photo taken on August 15, 2011


See also...

The Hunting of the Snark The Hunting of the Snark


Henry Holiday Henry Holiday


42 42



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pictorial quote
visuelle Semiotik
visual semiotics
pictorial citation
interpictorial
Cryptomorphism
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pictorial allusions
Victorian era
hidden images
religious iconography
teaching arts
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Provenienzforschung
Kunstwissenschaft
English literature
favorites
camouflage
comparison
hidden pictures
pictorial
Lewis Carroll
allusions
Bildzitat
The Hunting of the Snark
Henry Holiday
conundrum
iconoclasm
Joseph Swain
arts research
Snark after May 2013
juvenile books
Edward VI
Allusionsforschung
allusion research
crossover books
crossover
religion


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Thomas Cranmer's 42 Boxes

42 Boxes meet the Iconoclasts

42 Boxes meet the Iconoclasts 

[left]: Segment (devided) of Henry Holiday's depiction of the Baker's visit to his uncle (1876) in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark (engraved by Joseph Swain). Outside of the window are some of the Baker's 42 boxes.

[right]: Anonymous: Segment (two times) of Edward VI and the Pope, An Allegory of Reformation, mirrored view (16th century). Iconoclasm depicted in the window. Under the window (see below) is Thomas Cranmer who wrote the 42 Articles in 1552. In The King's Bedpost: Reformation and Iconography in a Tudor Group Portrait (1994, p. 72), the late Margaret Aston compared the iconoclastic scene to prints depicting the destruction of the Tower of Babel (Philip Galle after Maarten van Heemskerck, 1567). From Margaret Aston's book I learned that the section showing the iconoclasm scene is an inset, not a window. Actually, it may have been an inset which was meant to be perceived as a window as well.

Comments
Götz Kluge
Götz Kluge
Thomas Cranmer's 42 Boxes

The Baker's 42 Boxes
4 years ago. Edited 4 years ago.