See also...

Assemblage Assemblage


Lewis Carroll Lewis Carroll


Noses Noses


I feel manipulated I feel manipulated


Henry Holiday Henry Holiday


Art is Art Art is Art


Paintings Paintings


See more...

Keywords

Snark after May 2013
paranoiac-critical method
juvenile books
zoomorphism
John Martin
The Bard
Henry Holiday
The Hunting of the Snark
Allusionsforschung
allusion research
crossover
crossover books


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The Monster in the Branches

The Monster in the Branches
2014-01-26: I like this allusion by Henry Holiday in one of his illustrations to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark to a little detail in John Martin's The Bard so much, that I made yet another assemblage.


Color image:
John Martin: The Bard, now in the Yale Center for British Art

Large black&white inlay:
[left]: John Martin: Detail from The Bard (ca. 1817)
[right, mirror view]: Henry Holiday: From Illustration (1876) to chapter The Beaver's Lesson in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark


I assume, that Holiday used allusions in order to construct conundrums. However, alluding to works of other artists also helps to draw inspiration in a quick and efficient manner.


See also p. 3 in www.academia.edu/9923718/Henry_Holidays_Monsterspotting

Comments
 Götz Kluge
Götz Kluge club
Earlier version:
Monster Nose

Other roots of the monster:
Monster Feet

There are more allusions: Here you see the secret behind the
illustration to the Snark chapter The Beaver's Lesson:
Bellman & Bard
6 years ago. Edited 6 years ago.
 Götz Kluge
Götz Kluge club
Illustration to the Snark chapter The Beaver's Lesson:
h50

Album:

John Martin
6 years ago. Edited 6 years ago.
 Götz Kluge
Götz Kluge club
4 years ago. Edited 4 years ago.

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