«L.C. forgot that "the Snark" is a tragedy and [should] on no account be made jovial.»

Letter by C.L. Dodgson (aka Lewis Carroll) to Henry Holiday. The two lines at the bottom are by Henry Holiday. Source: www.pbagalleries.com/images/lot/1859/185970_0.jpg in www.pbagalleries.com/view-auctions/catalog/id/384/lot/119222/Original-drawing-by -Lewis-Carroll-in-illustration-of-The-Hunting-of-the-Snark-and-an-autograph-lett er-from-him-to-the-book-s-illustrator-critiquing-his-designs-bound-into-a-copy-o f-the-book "... The letter, dated Jan. 4, 1876, highlights Carroll’s and Holiday’s different ar…

Ditchley Snark

The image shows Henry Holiday's illustration (1876) to the front cover of Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark compared to a grey shaded reproduction of the Ditchley Portrait (a gift from Sir Henry Lee to Queen Elizabeth I, c. 1592) by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger. "While I concede Tufail 's thesis (2003) that Holiday received his instructions from Carroll and created his illustrations to reflect Carroll's cryptic messages and allusions, I contend that the interpretations given to the words we k…

IT WAS A BOOJUM

[left]: Henry Holiday's back cover illustration (1876) to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark. [right]: Allegorical English School painting (ca. 1610, redrawn and rearranged: 2013) of Queen Elizabeth I at Old Age with allegory of Death and Father Time. (Location of original painting: Corsham Court, EAN-Number: 4050356835081) www.corsham-court.co.uk/Pictures/Commentary.html: "This portrait of Elizabeth I illustrates the difficulties she encountered during her troubled reign. For example, conflict betwe…

The Bellman and Father Time

Henry Holiday's depiction of the Bellman in fhe front cover illustration to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark and Father Time from an allegorical English School painting (ca. 1610) depicting Queen Elizabeth I at Old Age. That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold; What hath quench'd them hath given me fire. Hark! Peace! It was the owl that shriek'd, the fatal bellman, Which gives the stern'st good-night. He is about it: The doors are open; and the surfeited grooms Do mock their charge with…

The Vanishing of Thomas Cranmer

--> www.ipernity.com/doc/goetzkluge/41786012

Gnarly Monstrance

From his eeriest illustration to The Hunting of the Snark, Henry Holiday alluded to an monstrance-like simulacrum in John Martin's The Bard. [left] Henry Holiday: Illustration (1876) to chapter The Vanishing in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark, detail [right] John Martin: The Bard (ca. 1817), mirror view of a horizontally compressed detail.

John Martin - The Bard

recto, unframed deliver.odai.yale.edu/content/id/594cf828-e6b8-4ec4-bf14-cac45880305d/format/3 ===================== John Martin: The Bard ca. 1817 Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection collections.britishart.yale.edu/vufind/Record/1671616: "Based on a Thomas Gray poem, inspired by a Welsh tradition that said that Edward I had put to death any bards he found, to extinguish Welsh culture; the poem depicts the escape of a single bard. In mydailyartdisplay.wordpress.com/the-bard-by-john-mar…

Bard and Bellman

[left] John Martin: The Bard (ca. 1817), detail [right] Henry Holiday: Illustration (1876) to chapter The Beaver's Lesson in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark, detail

Bellman & Bard

[main image]: John Martin: The Bard (ca. 1817), by GIMP: contrast enhanced in the rock area & light areas delated. [inset] Henry Holiday: Illustration (1876) to chapter The Beaver's Lesson in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark, detail In mydailyartdisplay.wordpress.com/the-bard-by-john-martin, "Jonathan" connects the painting to the poem The Bard written by by Thomas Gray in 1755. Inspired by a Welsh tradition that said that Edward I had put to death any bards he found, to extinguish Welsh…
55 items in total