Ditchley Snark

The image shows Henry Holiday's illustration (1876) to the front cover of Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark compared to a grey shaded reproduction of the Ditchley Portrait (a gift from Sir Henry Lee to Queen Elizabeth I, c. 1592) by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger. "While I concede Tufail 's thesis (2003) that Holiday received his instructions from Carroll and created his illustrations to reflect Carroll's cryptic messages and allusions, I contend that the interpretations given to the words we k…

IT WAS A BOOJUM

[left]: Henry Holiday's back cover illustration (1876) to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark. [right]: Allegorical English School painting (ca. 1610, redrawn and rearranged: 2013) of Queen Elizabeth I at Old Age with allegory of Death and Father Time. (Location of original painting: Corsham Court, EAN-Number: 4050356835081) www.corsham-court.co.uk/Pictures/Commentary.html: "This portrait of Elizabeth I illustrates the difficulties she encountered during her troubled reign. For example, conflict betwe…

The Bellman and Father Time

Henry Holiday's depiction of the Bellman in fhe front cover illustration to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark and Father Time from an allegorical English School painting (ca. 1610) depicting Queen Elizabeth I at Old Age. That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold; What hath quench'd them hath given me fire. Hark! Peace! It was the owl that shriek'd, the fatal bellman, Which gives the stern'st good-night. He is about it: The doors are open; and the surfeited grooms Do mock their charge with…

The Snark in your Dreams

The lower image is the only Snark illustration by Henry Holiday which shows the Snark. However, in this case the beast appeared in The Barrister's dream. Therefore it is just a Dream Snark. [top]: Detail from the etching (1566-1568) The Image Breakers by Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder. [bottom]: Detail from the illustration (1876) by Henry Holiday to The Hunting of the Snark. Lewis Carroll (C. L. Dodgson) did not want Henry Holiday to depict the Snark in the illustrations to The Hunting of the Snark. But Hol…

Dream Snarks

[top]: Detail from the etching (1566-1568) The Image Breakers by Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder. [center]: Detail from the illustration (1876) by Henry Holiday to The Hunting of the Snark. C. L. Dodgson did not want Henry Holiday to depict the Snark in the illustrations to The Hunting of the Snark. But Holiday was allowed to let it appear veiled by its "gown, bands, and wig" in The Barrister's Dream. [bottom]: Redrawn image from a concept draft by C. L. Dodgson (aka Lewis Carroll). The original drawing was p…

Inspiration by Reinterpretation

Henry Holiday reinterprets Marcus Gheeraerts II in The Hunting of the Snark [left]: Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger: Catherine Killigrew, Lady Jermyn (1614) [right]: Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger: Mary Throckmorton, Lady Scudamore (1615) [center]: Henry Holiday: Segment of an illustration to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark (1876) · · 057· · He came as a Butcher: but gravely declared, · · 058· · · · When the ship had been sailing a week, · · 059· · He could only kill Beavers. The Bellman looked sc…

The Bandersnatch fled as the others appeared

In Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark, the intertextuality of the poem is paralleled by the interpictoriality of Henry Holiday's illustrations: Here Henry Holiday reinterprets Marcus Gheeraerts I+II. The image above shows Henry Holiday's illustration to the chapter The Banker's Fate. (A small part of the left side has been removed in order to achieve a 4:3 ratio. The largest size is 5696 x 4352 pixels.) To Holiday's illustration I added images from which, in my opinion, he had borrowed shapes and con…

A Nose Job

[left]: a segment of Henry Holiday's illustration to The Banker's Fate (after his encounter with the Bandersnatch) in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark (1876) and [right]: a horizontally compressed segment of The Image Breakers (1566-1568), an etching by Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder. The resemblance of the "noses" is obvious once you mirror the nose in this image about a horizontal axis. Reinterpratation of shapes (examples): The segment of the spectacle frame is less obvious. Blurr the correspondi…

The Banker's Nose and Spectacles

[left]: The Banker after his encounter with the Bandersnatch, depicted in a segment of Henry Holiday's illustration (woodcut by Joseph Swain for block printing) to The Banker's Fate in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark (scanned from an 1876 edition of the book) [right]: a horizontally compressed copy of The Image Breakers (1566-1568) aka Allegory of Iconoclasm, an etching by Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder (British Museum, Dept. of Print and Drawings, 1933.1.1..3, see also Edward Hodnett: Marcus Gheera…
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