The Bard (detail)

John Martin


Anthropomorphic Landscapes

05 Mar 2016 2 2 956
I used this small image in a comment to publicdomainreview.org/collections/the-art-of-hidden-faces-anthropomorphic-landscapes Antropomorphism isn't about faces only. Actually, humans have two pairs of cheeks. One pair of these cheeks is part of our faces. The other pair of cheeks is elswhere on our bodies. (If sitters are sitters, you don't see that pair too well.) In the example below from one of Henry Holiday's illustration to Lewis Carroll's "The Hunting of the Snark" (engraved by Joseph Swain) , Holiday wasn't inspired by John Martin's "The Bard" only. He also altered his allusion to that painting by giving the rocks the shape of our lower second pair of cheeks. And he also copied a small pattern from Martin's painting which doesn't contribute to the appearance of his illustration. Thus, this pattern simply may serve as a hint to the beholders of his Snark illustration that Holiday didn't steal anything from John Martin. Henry Holiday was an honest conundrum builder. Did you find the antropomorphic "cheeks" on the rocks in the detail from Henry Holiday's illustration, which I mounted as an inset into John Martin's "The Bard"?

John Martin - The Bard

01 Jun 2013 1 8 1562
recto, unframed deliver.odai.yale.edu/content/id/594cf828-e6b8-4ec4-bf14-cac45880305d/format/3 ===================== John Martin: The Bard ca. 1817 Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection collections.britishart.yale.edu/vufind/Record/1671616 : "Based on a Thomas Gray poem, inspired by a Welsh tradition that said that Edward I had put to death any bards he found, to extinguish Welsh culture; the poem depicts the escape of a single bard. In mydailyartdisplay.wordpress.com/the-bard-by-john-martin , "Jonathan" connects the painting to the poem The Bard written by by Thomas Gray in 1755: · · ... · · On a rock, whose haughty brow · · Frowns o'er cold Conway's foaming flood, · · Robed in the sable garb of woe · · With haggard eyes the Poet stood; · · ... · · "Enough for me: with joy I see · · The diff'rent doom our fates assign. · · Be thine Despair and sceptred Care; · · To triumph and to die are mine." · · He spoke, and headlong from the mountain's height · · Deep in the roaring tide he plunged to endless night. · · ... The poem and the painting may have been an inspiration to Lewis Carroll and Henry Holiday in The Hunting of the Snark: · · 545 · · Erect and sublime, for one moment of time. · · 546· · · · In the next, that wild figure they saw · · 547· · (As if stung by a spasm) plunge into a chasm, · · 548· · · · While they waited and listened in awe. · See also: Henry Holiday's Snark illustrations and John Martin's "The Bard": - www.academia.edu/9885417/The_Bellman_and_the_Bard - www.academia.edu/9923718/Henry_Holidays_Monsterspotting - www.academia.edu/10251338/Monsters_and_Monstrances - www.academia.edu/12586460/The_Bard_the_Baker_and_the_Butcher

John Martin' s "The Bard" prepared for analysis

31 Aug 2014 6 2591
Source of the painting on the left side: deliver.odai.yale.edu/content/id/594cf828-e6b8-4ec4-bf14-cac45880305d/format/3 left: John Martin, The Bard center: desaturated, increased contrast of large dark area (rocks) on the right side right: GIMP, Retinex filtering: Scale=160, ScaleDivision=6, Dynamic=2.5 ===================== John Martin: The Bard ca. 1817 Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection collections.britishart.yale.edu/vufind/Record/1671616 : "Based on a Thomas Gray poem, inspired by a Welsh tradition that said that Edward I had put to death any bards he found, to extinguish Welsh culture; the poem depicts the escape of a single bard. In mydailyartdisplay.wordpress.com/the-bard-by-john-martin , "Jonathan" connects the painting to the poem The Bard written by by Thomas Gray in 1755: · · ... · · On a rock, whose haughty brow · · Frowns o'er cold Conway's foaming flood, · · Robed in the sable garb of woe · · With haggard eyes the Poet stood; · · ... · · "Enough for me: with joy I see · · The diff'rent doom our fates assign. · · Be thine Despair and sceptred Care; · · To triumph and to die are mine." · · He spoke, and headlong from the mountain's height · · Deep in the roaring tide he plunged to endless night. · · ... The poem and the painting may have been an inspiration to Lewis Carroll and Henry Holiday in The Hunting of the Snark: · · 545 · · Erect and sublime, for one moment of time. · · 546· · · · In the next, that wild figure they saw · · 547· · (As if stung by a spasm) plunge into a chasm, · · 548· · · · While they waited and listened in awe. Album: John Martin

The Bard (detail)

01 Jun 2013 1 629
to be used as icon

Bard and Bellman

08 Dec 2012 1 1402
[left] John Martin: The Bard (ca. 1817), detail [right] Henry Holiday: Illustration (1876) to chapter The Beaver's Lesson in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark , detail

Bellman & Bard

21 Nov 2013 2 5 1893
[main image]: John Martin: The Bard (ca. 1817) , by GIMP: contrast enhanced in the rock area & light areas delated. [inset] Henry Holiday: Illustration (1876) to chapter The Beaver's Lesson in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark , detail In mydailyartdisplay.wordpress.com/the-bard-by-john-martin , "Jonathan" connects the painting to the poem The Bard written by by Thomas Gray in 1755. Inspired by a Welsh tradition that said that Edward I had put to death any bards he found, to extinguish Welsh culture; the poem depicts the escape of a single bard: · · ... · · On a rock, whose haughty brow · · Frowns o'er cold Conway's foaming flood, · · Robed in the sable garb of woe · · With haggard eyes the Poet stood; · · ... · · A Voice, as of the Cherub-Choir, · · Gales from blooming Eden bear; · · And distant warblings lessen on my ear, · · That lost in long futurity expire. · · Fond impious Man, think'st thou, yon sanguine cloud, · · Rais'd by thy breath, has quench'd the Orb of day? · · To-morrow he repairs the golden flood, · · And warms the nations with redoubled ray. · · "Enough for me: With joy I see · · The different doom our Fates assign. · · Be thine Despair, and scept'red Care, · · To triumph, and to die, are mine." · · He spoke, and headlong from the mountain's height · · Deep in the roaring tide he plung'd to endless night. · · ... Full text: www.thomasgray.org/cgi-bin/display.cgi?text=bapo spenserians.cath.vt.edu/TextRecord.php?action=GET&tex... www.english.upenn.edu/~mgamer/Etexts/gray.bard.html www.google.com/search?q="A+Voice,+as+of+the+Cherub-Choir" The poem and the painting may have been an inspiration to Lewis Carroll and Henry Holiday in The Hunting of the Snark . This is about The Vanishing of The Baker : · · 537 · · "There is Thingumbob shouting!" the Bellman said, · · 538 · · · · "He is shouting like mad, only hark! · · 539 · · He is waving his hands, he is wagging his head, · · 540 · · · · He has certainly found a Snark!" · · 541 · · They gazed in delight, while the Butcher exclaimed · · 542 · · · · "He was always a desperate wag!" · · 543 · · They beheld him--their Baker--their hero unnamed-- · · 544 · · · · On the top of a neighbouring crag. · · 545 · · Erect and sublime, for one moment of time. · · 546 · · · · In the next, that wild figure they saw · · 547 · · (As if stung by a spasm) plunge into a chasm, · · 548 · · · · While they waited and listened in awe. Album: John Martin

Bellman & Bard

23 Nov 2013 1 1 2186
[main image]: John Martin: The Bard (ca. 1817) , by GIMP: contrast enhanced in the rock area & light areas delated & (most of) color removed [inset]: Henry Holiday: Illustration (1876) to chapter The Beaver's Lesson in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark , detail In mydailyartdisplay.wordpress.com/the-bard-by-john-martin , "Jonathan" connects the painting to the poem The Bard written by by Thomas Gray in 1755. Inspired by a Welsh tradition that said that Edward I had put to death any bards he found, to extinguish Welsh culture; the poem depicts the escape of a single bard: · · ... · · On a rock, whose haughty brow · · Frowns o'er cold Conway's foaming flood, · · Robed in the sable garb of woe · · With haggard eyes the Poet stood; · · ... · · A Voice, as of the Cherub-Choir, · · Gales from blooming Eden bear; · · And distant warblings lessen on my ear, · · That lost in long futurity expire. · · Fond impious Man, think'st thou, yon sanguine cloud, · · Rais'd by thy breath, has quench'd the Orb of day? · · To-morrow he repairs the golden flood, · · And warms the nations with redoubled ray. · · "Enough for me: With joy I see · · The different doom our Fates assign. · · Be thine Despair, and scept'red Care, · · To triumph, and to die, are mine." · · He spoke, and headlong from the mountain's height · · Deep in the roaring tide he plung'd to endless night. · · ... Full text: www.thomasgray.org/cgi-bin/display.cgi?text=bapo spenserians.cath.vt.edu/TextRecord.php?action=GET&tex... www.english.upenn.edu/~mgamer/Etexts/gray.bard.html www.google.com/search?q="A+Voice,+as+of+the+Cherub-Choir" The poem and the painting may have been an inspiration to Lewis Carroll and Henry Holiday in The Hunting of the Snark . This is about The Vanishing of The Baker : · · 537 · · "There is Thingumbob shouting!" the Bellman said, · · 538 · · · · "He is shouting like mad, only hark! · · 539 · · He is waving his hands, he is wagging his head, · · 540 · · · · He has certainly found a Snark!" · · 541 · · They gazed in delight, while the Butcher exclaimed · · 542 · · · · "He was always a desperate wag!" · · 543 · · They beheld him--their Baker--their hero unnamed-- · · 544 · · · · On the top of a neighbouring crag. · · 545 · · Erect and sublime, for one moment of time. · · 546 · · · · In the next, that wild figure they saw · · 547 · · (As if stung by a spasm) plunge into a chasm, · · 548 · · · · While they waited and listened in awe. Album: John Martin

Bellman & Bard after retinex filtering

05 Jan 2014 5 1572
[main image]: John Martin: The Bard (ca. 1817) , by GIMP: contrast enhanced in the rock area & light areas delated & (most of) color removed & retinex filtering [upper inset]: Detail from preperatory draft for Henry Holiday's illustration (1876) to chapter The Beaver's Lesson in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark [lower inset]: Henry Holiday: Illustration (1876) to chapter The Beaver's Lesson in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark , detail It seems, that initially Henry Holiday saw anthropomorphic "faces" in John Martin's rocks and used them in his draft. However, Holiday's final allusion to this part of John Martin's painting is different - and funnier. As the for The Bard , the final Bellman comes closer to that figure than the drafted Bellman. === Literature === In mydailyartdisplay.wordpress.com/the-bard-by-john-martin , "Jonathan" connects the painting to the poem The Bard written by by Thomas Gray in 1755. Inspired by a Welsh tradition that said that Edward I had put to death any bards he found, to extinguish Welsh culture; the poem depicts the escape of a single bard: · · ... · · On a rock, whose haughty brow · · Frowns o'er cold Conway's foaming flood, · · Robed in the sable garb of woe · · With haggard eyes the Poet stood; · · ... · · A Voice, as of the Cherub-Choir, · · Gales from blooming Eden bear; · · And distant warblings lessen on my ear, · · That lost in long futurity expire. · · Fond impious Man, think'st thou, yon sanguine cloud, · · Rais'd by thy breath, has quench'd the Orb of day? · · To-morrow he repairs the golden flood, · · And warms the nations with redoubled ray. · · "Enough for me: With joy I see · · The different doom our Fates assign. · · Be thine Despair, and scept'red Care, · · To triumph, and to die, are mine." · · He spoke, and headlong from the mountain's height · · Deep in the roaring tide he plung'd to endless night. · · ... Full text: www.thomasgray.org/cgi-bin/display.cgi?text=bapo spenserians.cath.vt.edu/TextRecord.php?action=GET&tex... www.english.upenn.edu/~mgamer/Etexts/gray.bard.html www.google.com/search?q="A+Voice,+as+of+the+Cherub-Choir" The poem and the painting may have been an inspiration to Lewis Carroll and Henry Holiday in The Hunting of the Snark . This is about The Vanishing of The Baker : · · 537 · · "There is Thingumbob shouting!" the Bellman said, · · 538 · · · · "He is shouting like mad, only hark! · · 539 · · He is waving his hands, he is wagging his head, · · 540 · · · · He has certainly found a Snark!" · · 541 · · They gazed in delight, while the Butcher exclaimed · · 542 · · · · "He was always a desperate wag!" · · 543 · · They beheld him--their Baker--their hero unnamed-- · · 544 · · · · On the top of a neighbouring crag. · · 545 · · Erect and sublime, for one moment of time. · · 546 · · · · In the next, that wild figure they saw · · 547 · · (As if stung by a spasm) plunge into a chasm, · · 548 · · · · While they waited and listened in awe. Album: John Martin

John Martin's Bard and Henry Holiday's Snark Illus…

04 Sep 2014 1 2 1790
top left: John Martin, The Bard (1817). top right: John Martin, The Bard modified using GIMP, Retinex: Scale=160, ScaleDivision=6, Dynamic=2.5 bottom left: Illustration (1876) by Henry Holiday to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark , Fit 8. Changes: GIMP "delate" applied in order to yield a less darker printing. bottom right: Illustration (1876) by Henry Holiday to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark , Fit 5 4800 px × 6500 px 20.3 cm × 27.5 cm (@ 600 dpi) ===================================================== John Martin: The Bard ca. 1817 Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection collections.britishart.yale.edu/vufind/Record/1671616 : "Based on a Thomas Gray poem, inspired by a Welsh tradition that said that Edward I had put to death any bards he found, to extinguish Welsh culture; the poem depicts the escape of a single bard. In mydailyartdisplay.wordpress.com/the-bard-by-john-martin , "Jonathan" connects the painting to the poem The Bard written by by Thomas Gray in 1755: · · ... · · On a rock, whose haughty brow · · Frowns o'er cold Conway's foaming flood, · · Robed in the sable garb of woe · · With haggard eyes the Poet stood; · · ... · · "Enough for me: with joy I see · · The diff'rent doom our fates assign. · · Be thine Despair and sceptred Care; · · To triumph and to die are mine." · · He spoke, and headlong from the mountain's height · · Deep in the roaring tide he plunged to endless night. · · ... The poem and the painting may have been an inspiration to Lewis Carroll and Henry Holiday in The Hunting of the Snark: · · 545 · · Erect and sublime, for one moment of time. · · 546· · · · In the next, that wild figure they saw · · 547· · (As if stung by a spasm) plunge into a chasm, · · 548· · · · While they waited and listened in awe. Album: John Martin

Where do Boojums live?

08 Dec 2013 1 5 891
I posted this image to a "Carrollian" Facebook group. It was pending for a day and then disappeared. Perhaps it was not approved because of my Germanic English. Or did someone spot the Boojum somewhere in this image? Actually, such Boojums do not live in pictures. They live in brains.

Monster Feet

22 Dec 2012 3 953
(1) John Martin: The Bard ca. 1817 Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection collections.britishart.yale.edu/vufind/Record/1671616 (2) Inset: A monster from Henry Holiday's illustration to the chapter "The Beaver's Lesson" in Lewis Carroll's "The Hunting of the Snark" (1876)

The Monster in the Branches

26 Jan 2014 3 2233
2014-01-26: I like this allusion by Henry Holiday in one of his illustrations to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark to a little detail in John Martin's The Bard so much, that I made yet another assemblage. Color image: John Martin: The Bard , now in the Yale Center for British Art Large black&white inlay: [left]: John Martin: Detail from The Bard (ca. 1817) [right, mirror view]: Henry Holiday: From Illustration (1876) to chapter The Beaver's Lesson in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark I assume, that Holiday used allusions in order to construct conundrums. However, alluding to works of other artists also helps to draw inspiration in a quick and efficient manner. See also p. 3 in www.academia.edu/9923718/Henry_Holidays_Monsterspotting

Weeds turned Horses

30 Nov 2012 2 1067
(1) Henry Holiday: "The Vanishing" Illustration to Lewis Carroll's "The Hunting of the Snark" (1876), lower half (2) John Martin: "The Bard" (detail) commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:John_Martin_-_The_Bard_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg ca. 1817 Yale Center for British Art Based on a Thomas Gray poem, inspired by a Welsh tradition that said that Edward I had put to death any bards he found, to extinguish Welsh culture; the poem depicts the escape of a single bard.

Weeds turned Horses (BW)

30 Nov 2012 3 1792
Dithered B&W graphics, optimized fpr printing: 105 x 82 mm at 1200 dpi or 210 x 164 mm at 600 dpi (1) Henry Holiday: "The Vanishing" Illustration to Lewis Carroll's "The Hunting of the Snark" (1876), lower half (2) John Martin: "The Bard" (detail) commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:John_Martin_-_The_Bard_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg ca. 1817 Yale Center for British Art Based on a Thomas Gray poem, inspired by a Welsh tradition that said that Edward I had put to death any bards he found, to extinguish Welsh culture; the poem depicts the escape of a single bard.

Herbs & Horses

31 Mar 2014 2 4 1807
[left]: Henry Holiday: The Vanishing (detail from lower left side) Illustration to Lewis Carroll's "The Hunting of the Snark" (1876) [right]: John Martin: The Bard (retinex filtered and vectorized detail from lower left side) commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:John_Martin_-_The_Bard_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg (ca. 1817)

Weeds turned Horses (detail)

01 Jan 2013 2 768
[left]: Henry Holiday: "The Vanishing" (detail) Illustration to Lewis Carroll's "The Hunting of the Snark" (1876), lower left side [right]: John Martin: "The Bard" (detail) commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:John_Martin_-_The_Bard_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg (ca. 1817), lower left side

Weeds turned Horses (2)

09 Dec 2012 1 762
[left] Henry Holiday (and Joseph Swain): Illustration (1876) to chapter The Vanishing in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark , detail (showing some plants in the lower right corner of the original illustration) [right] John Martin: The Bard (ca. 1817), detail (showing an army sent by Edward I)

Gnarly Monstrance

26 Dec 2012 1 3 2531
From his eeriest illustration to The Hunting of the Snark , Henry Holiday alluded to an monstrance-like simulacrum in John Martin's The Bard . [left] Henry Holiday: Illustration (1876) to chapter The Vanishing in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark , detail [right] John Martin: The Bard (ca. 1817), mirror view of a horizontally compressed detail.

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