Martin M. Miles' photos

Costiera Amalfitana - Monti Picentini

01 Feb 2022 4 1 9
The "Costiera Amalfitana" - Amalfi Coast, overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea and the Gulf of Salerno, has been (rightly) one of the places of longing for northern European tourists for about 300 years. Meanwhile, the Amalfi Coast attracts large crowds of international tourists, especially in the summer. In 1997, the coasts were included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Salerno in the distance and behind the snowy peaks of the Monti Picentini.

Costiera Amalfitana

01 Feb 2022 3 1 9
The "Costiera Amalfitana" - Amalfi Coast, overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea and the Gulf of Salerno, has been (rightly) one of the places of longing for northern European tourists for about 300 years. Meanwhile, the Amalfi Coast attracts large crowds of international tourists, especially in the summer. In 1997, the coasts were included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Small islands in the sun

Capri - Sunset

01 Feb 2022 3 11
Capri Island in the background

Conca dei Marini - San Michele

01 Feb 2022 1 5
The "Costiera Amalfitana" - Amalfi Coast, overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea and the Gulf of Salerno, has been (rightly) one of the places of longing for northern European tourists for about 300 years. Meanwhile, the Amalfi Coast attracts large crowds of international tourists, especially in the summer. In 1997, the coasts were included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. We had rented a small apartment and could see San Michele from the balcony. The facade of the church has been decorated with this "Maria Lactans" since 1936.

Conca dei Marini - San Michele

01 Feb 2022 5
The "Costiera Amalfitana" - Amalfi Coast, overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea and the Gulf of Salerno, has been (rightly) one of the places of longing for northern European tourists for about 300 years. Meanwhile, the Amalfi Coast attracts large crowds of international tourists, especially in the summer. In 1997, the coasts were included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. We had rented a small apartment and could see San Michele from the balcony.

Conca dei Marini - Costiera Amalfitana

01 Feb 2022 2 9
The "Costiera Amalfitana" - Amalfi Coast, overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea and the Gulf of Salerno, has been (rightly) one of the places of longing for northern European tourists for about 300 years. Meanwhile, the Amalfi Coast attracts large crowds of international tourists, especially in the summer. In 1997, the coasts were included in the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Conca dei Marini - Piaggio Ape

01 Feb 2022 5
The "Costiera Amalfitana" - Amalfi Coast, overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea and the Gulf of Salerno, has many narrow and very steep roads, perfect for a Piaggio Ape (Ape = Bee), a three-wheeled vehicle. It is in continuous production since its 1948 introduction.

Conca dei Marini -Costiera Amalfitana

01 Feb 2022 4
The "Costiera Amalfitana" - Amalfi Coast, overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea and the Gulf of Salerno, has been (rightly) one of the places of longing for northern European tourists for about 300 years. Meanwhile, the Amalfi Coast attracts large crowds of international tourists, especially in the summer. In 1997, the coasts were included in the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Amalfi - Duomo di Amalfi

01 Feb 2022 2 5
Amalfi is the main town of the coast on which it is located, named Costiera Amalfitana (Amalfi Coast), and is included in the UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Today a town with a population of about 5000, Amalfi was a maritime power in the early days, when Amalfi traders enjoyed privileged positions in the Mediterranean ports. An independent republic from the 7th century until 1073, Amalfi extracted itself from Byzantine vassalage in 839, It rivaled Pisa and Genoa in its domestic prosperity and maritime importance before the rise of the Republic of Venice. In 1073 Amalfi fell to the Norman countship of Apulia. Emperor Lothair, fighting in favor of Pope Innocent II against Roger, who sided with the Antipope Anacletus, took him prisoner in 1133, assisted by the Pisans who sacked the city. It was taken by the Pisans soon after and rapidly declined in importance. A tsunami in 1343 destroyed the port and lower town, and Amalfi never recovered to anything more than local importance. The erection of the Amalfi Cathedral was begun in the 9th and 10th centuries. It has been added to and redecorated several times, overlaying Arab-Norman, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque elements, and finally a new 19th-century Norman-Arab-Byzantine facade. The first church was built in the 9th century on the ruins of a previous temple. A second church was built in the 10th century. By the 12th century, the two churches formed a single 6-aisle Romanesque church, which was reduced to 5 in the 13th century to allow the construction of the cloister. The remains of St. Andrew were reportedly brought to Amalfi from Constantinople in 1206 during the Fourth Crusade. Two years later the crypt was completed and the relics were turned over to the church. The bell tower was constructed between the 12th and 13th centuries in front of the first church, topped by an elaborate crown decorated in the Arab-Norman style. In 1861, part of the facade collapsed. The whole front of the church was then rebuilt in a decorated manner drawing on Italian Gothic and Arab-Norman styles. An advantage of traveling in winter is that there are few other tourists, a disadvantage is that the buildings are sometimes closed for the winter. The cloister and museum do not reopen until April 1. We only peeped into the Chiostro Paradiso through a window.

Amalfi - Duomo di Amalfi

01 Feb 2022 2 8
Amalfi is the main town of the coast on which it is located, named Costiera Amalfitana (Amalfi Coast), and is included in the UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Today a town with a population of about 5000, Amalfi was a maritime power in the early days, when Amalfi traders enjoyed privileged positions in the Mediterranean ports. An independent republic from the 7th century until 1073, Amalfi extracted itself from Byzantine vassalage in 839, It rivaled Pisa and Genoa in its domestic prosperity and maritime importance before the rise of the Republic of Venice. In 1073 Amalfi fell to the Norman countship of Apulia. Emperor Lothair, fighting in favor of Pope Innocent II against Roger, who sided with the Antipope Anacletus, took him prisoner in 1133, assisted by the Pisans who sacked the city. It was taken by the Pisans soon after and rapidly declined in importance. A tsunami in 1343 destroyed the port and lower town, and Amalfi never recovered to anything more than local importance. The erection of the Amalfi Cathedral was begun in the 9th and 10th centuries. It has been added to and redecorated several times, overlaying Arab-Norman, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque elements, and finally a new 19th-century Norman-Arab-Byzantine facade. The first church was built in the 9th century on the ruins of a previous temple. A second church was built in the 10th century. By the 12th century, the two churches formed a single 6-aisle Romanesque church, which was reduced to 5 in the 13th century to allow the construction of the cloister. The remains of St. Andrew were reportedly brought to Amalfi from Constantinople in 1206 during the Fourth Crusade. Two years later the crypt was completed and the relics were turned over to the church. The bell tower was constructed between the 12th and 13th centuries in front of the first church, topped by an elaborate crown decorated in the Arab-Norman style. In 1861, part of the facade collapsed. The whole front of the church was then rebuilt in a decorated manner drawing on Italian Gothic and Arab-Norman styles.

Amalfi - Duomo di Amalfi

01 Feb 2022 2 3 11
Amalfi is the main town of the coast on which it is located, named Costiera Amalfitana (Amalfi Coast), and is included in the UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Today a town with a population of about 5000, Amalfi was a maritime power in the early days, when Amalfi traders enjoyed privileged positions in the Mediterranean ports. An independent republic from the 7th century until 1073, Amalfi extracted itself from Byzantine vassalage in 839, It rivaled Pisa and Genoa in its domestic prosperity and maritime importance before the rise of the Republic of Venice. In 1073 Amalfi fell to the Norman countship of Apulia. Emperor Lothair, fighting in favor of Pope Innocent II against Roger, who sided with the Antipope Anacletus, took him prisoner in 1133, assisted by the Pisans who sacked the city. It was taken by the Pisans soon after and rapidly declined in importance. A tsunami in 1343 destroyed the port and lower town, and Amalfi never recovered to anything more than local importance. The erection of the Amalfi Cathedral was begun in the 9th and 10th centuries. It has been added to and redecorated several times, overlaying Arab-Norman, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque elements, and finally a new 19th-century Norman-Arab-Byzantine facade. The first church was built in the 9th century on the ruins of a previous temple. A second church was built in the 10th century. By the 12th century, the two churches formed a single 6-aisle Romanesque church, which was reduced to 5 in the 13th century to allow the construction of the cloister. The remains of St. Andrew were reportedly brought to Amalfi from Constantinople in 1206 during the Fourth Crusade. Two years later the crypt was completed and the relics were turned over to the church. The bell tower was constructed between the 12th and 13th centuries in front of the first church, topped by an elaborate crown decorated in the Arab-Norman style. In 1861, part of the facade collapsed. The whole front of the church was then rebuilt in a decorated manner drawing on Italian Gothic and Arab-Norman styles.

Amalfi - Pasticceria Andrea Pansa

01 Feb 2022 1 7
Amalfi is the main town of the coast on which it is located, named Costiera Amalfitana (Amalfi Coast), and is included in the UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Today a town with a population of about 5000, Amalfi was a maritime power in the early days, when Amalfi traders enjoyed privileged positions in the Mediterranean ports. An independent republic from the 7th century until 1073, Amalfi extracted itself from Byzantine vassalage in 839, It rivaled Pisa and Genoa in its domestic prosperity and maritime importance before the rise of the Republic of Venice. In 1073 Amalfi fell to the Norman countship of Apulia. Emperor Lothair, fighting in favor of Pope Innocent II against Roger, who sided with the Antipope Anacletus, took him prisoner in 1133, assisted by the Pisans who sacked the city. It was taken by the Pisans soon after and rapidly declined in importance. A tsunami in 1343 destroyed the port and lower town, and Amalfi never recovered to anything more than local importance. The confectionery was founded in 1830 by Andrea Pansa. This is where the first tourists met in the 19th century to try the "Dolci". In the meantime, these delicious goods are even sent from here to you all over the world www.pasticceriapansa.com/default.asp

Amalfi

01 Feb 2022 8
Amalfi is the main town of the coast on which it is located, named Costiera Amalfitana (Amalfi Coast), and is included in the UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Today a town with a population of about 5000, Amalfi was a maritime power in the early days, when Amalfi traders enjoyed privileged positions in the Mediterranean ports. An independent republic from the 7th century until 1073, Amalfi extracted itself from Byzantine vassalage in 839, It rivaled Pisa and Genoa in its domestic prosperity and maritime importance before the rise of the Republic of Venice. In 1073 Amalfi fell to the Norman countship of Apulia. Emperor Lothair, fighting in favor of Pope Innocent II against Roger, who sided with the Antipope Anacletus, took him prisoner in 1133, assisted by the Pisans who sacked the city. It was taken by the Pisans soon after and rapidly declined in importance. A tsunami in 1343 destroyed the port and lower town, and Amalfi never recovered to anything more than local importance.

Salerno - Fratelli Ferraiolo

01 Feb 2022 2 1 10
Salerno (pop. ~ 130.000) is located on the Gulf of Salerno on the Tyrrhenian Sea. The site has been one of the most important and strategic ports on the Mediterranean sea, yielding a rich Greco-Roman heritage. It was an independent Lombard principality in the early Middle Ages. The Normans in 1077 made Salerno the capital of their rule in all of southern Italy. In the 16th century, under the Sanseverino family, among the most powerful feudal lords in southern Italy, the city became a center of learning, culture, and the arts. Salerno has been the seat of an archbishop since 983 and the city's medical school is famous for being the first college or "university" of medieval Europe. Puppet shows have a long tradition in Italy and everyone flocks to their seats when Pulcinella is there! In winter, however, the actors are on vacation. www.ferraiolo.it

Salerno - Museo Diocesano San Matteo

01 Feb 2022 1 6
Salerno (pop. ~ 130.000) is located on the Gulf of Salerno on the Tyrrhenian Sea. The site has been one of the most important and strategic ports on the Mediterranean sea, yielding a rich Greco-Roman heritage. It was an independent Lombard principality in the early Middle Ages. The Normans in 1077 made Salerno the capital of their rule in all of southern Italy. In the 16th century, under the Sanseverino family, among the most powerful feudal lords in southern Italy, the city became a center of learning, culture, and the arts. Salerno has been the seat of an archbishop since 983 and the city's medical school is famous for being the first college or "university" of medieval Europe. The Diocesan Museum is best known for the "Salerno Ivories". A collection of ivory plaques from around the 11th or 12th century that contain elements of Early Christian, Byzantine, and Islamic art as well as influences from Western Romanesque and Anglo-Saxon art, but there is much more. The "Madonna della Gracia" is attributed to Domenico Napolitano / 16th. century

Salerno - Museo Diocesano San Matteo

01 Feb 2022 6
Salerno (pop. ~ 130.000) is located on the Gulf of Salerno on the Tyrrhenian Sea. The site has been one of the most important and strategic ports on the Mediterranean sea, yielding a rich Greco-Roman heritage. It was an independent Lombard principality in the early Middle Ages. The Normans in 1077 made Salerno the capital of their rule in all of southern Italy. In the 16th century, under the Sanseverino family, among the most powerful feudal lords in southern Italy, the city became a center of learning, culture, and the arts. Salerno has been the seat of an archbishop since 983 and the city's medical school is famous for being the first college or "university" of medieval Europe. The Diocesan Museum is best known for the "Salerno Ivories". A collection of ivory plaques from around the 11th or 12th century that contain elements of Early Christian, Byzantine, and Islamic art as well as influences from Western Romanesque and Anglo-Saxon art, but there is much more. The so called "Croce di Roberto il Guiscardo" (Cross of Robert Guiscard) from the 12th century.

Salerno - Museo Diocesano San Matteo

01 Feb 2022 6
Salerno (pop. ~ 130.000) is located on the Gulf of Salerno on the Tyrrhenian Sea. The site has been one of the most important and strategic ports on the Mediterranean sea, yielding a rich Greco-Roman heritage. It was an independent Lombard principality in the early Middle Ages. The Normans in 1077 made Salerno the capital of their rule in all of southern Italy. In the 16th century, under the Sanseverino family, among the most powerful feudal lords in southern Italy, the city became a center of learning, culture, and the arts. Salerno has been the seat of an archbishop since 983 and the city's medical school is famous for being the first college or "university" of medieval Europe. The Diocesan Museum is best known for the "Salerno Ivories". A collection of ivory plaques from around the 11th or 12th century that contain elements of Early Christian, Byzantine, and Islamic art as well as influences from Western Romanesque and Anglo-Saxon art, but there is much more. The Byzantine crucifix is called "Di Pietro Barliario". It was created at the beginning of the 13th century

Salerno - Museo Diocesano San Matteo

01 Feb 2022 5
Salerno (pop. ~ 130.000) is located on the Gulf of Salerno on the Tyrrhenian Sea. The site has been one of the most important and strategic ports on the Mediterranean sea, yielding a rich Greco-Roman heritage. It was an independent Lombard principality in the early Middle Ages. The Normans in 1077 made Salerno the capital of their rule in all of southern Italy. In the 16th century, under the Sanseverino family, among the most powerful feudal lords in southern Italy, the city became a center of learning, culture, and the arts. Salerno has been the seat of an archbishop since 983 and the city's medical school is famous for being the first college or "university" of medieval Europe. The Diocesan Museum is best known for the "Salerno Ivories". A collection of ivory plaques from around the 11th or 12th century that contain elements of Early Christian, Byzantine, and Islamic art as well as influences from Western Romanesque and Anglo-Saxon art. It is the largest unified set of ivory carvings preserved from the pre-Gothic Middle Ages and depicts narrative scenes from both the Old and New Testaments. It is supposed the ivories originated in either Salerno or Amalfi, which both contain identified ivory workshops, however, neither has been definitively linked to the plaques so the city of origin remains unknown. The Crucifixion

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