Anne Elliott

Anne Elliott

Posted on 06/18/2015


Photo taken on May 31, 2015


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Keywords

nature
front view
May
Hummingbird
Archilochus colubris
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
SW of Calgary
FZ200
May Species Count 2015
Alberta
Canada
avian
spring
male
bird
outdoor
tiny
branch
ornithology
perched
flash of iridescent throat feathers


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Ruby-throated Hummingbird, flashing his colour

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, flashing his colour
I tried making this image a bit brighter, but then the glow from the colour of the neck feathers lessened. The flash of brilliant, iridescent colour is simply amazing. Not a close photo, but I don't think this photo could have coped with any further cropping. Usually, when I do see a Hummingbird on the rare occasion, it is a Calliope, so this sighting was a real treat.

"Approximately 9–10 cm long. Adult males are metallic green on the upperparts, iridescent ruby red on the throat, white on the underparts and green along the sides. Adult females look similar to males but with a white throat, greyish belly and buff along the sides of the belly, sometimes with a little red on the throat. Immature males look similar to females but with red streaks down the throat." From Canadian Wildlife Federation.

cwf-fcf.org/en/discover-wildlife/flora-fauna/fauna/birds/...

"These brilliant, tiny, precision-flying creatures glitter like jewels in the full sun, then vanish with a zip toward the next nectar source. Feeders and flower gardens are great ways to attract these birds, and some people turn their yards into buzzing clouds of hummingbirds each summer. Enjoy them while they’re around; by early fall they’re bound for Central America, with many crossing the Gulf of Mexico in a single flight." From AllABoutBirds.

www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ruby-throated_Hummingbird/id

This photo was taken on 31 May 2015, during the annual May Species Count. Eight of us covered a large area SW of Calgary, checking out the backroads, ponds, wetlands, sloughs. The highlight each May is calling in at a wonderful property where we are able to see some great species, including Evening Grosbeaks, Baltimore Orioles, and this year, this tiny Ruby-throated Hummingbird male.

We had a great day, stopping en route at Brown-Lowery Provincial Park to eat our lunch. This year, we didn't go into the park to look for Calypso Orchids, partly because a week ago, we did call in and found several of the small, pink Orchids. The temperature was 12C - 23C, with blue sky. Total distance travelled was 93 km and our total number of bird species was 63.

After the Count, we called in at a little tea place and enjoyed relaxing with welcome cups of coffee. Thanks so much, Monica, for treating us all to this and for driving your daughter and myself around all day - greatly appreciated!

The list, compiled by our leader, Gus Yaki, is long, but I will add it here, for my own memory. I'll add that, as usual, there were a lot of the birds that I didn't see - I don't use binoculars and also so many of the birds seemed to be the seen from the opposite side of the car, lol.

1. Canada Goose-19 + 20 juv.
2. Gadwall-2
3. American Wigeon-3
4. Mallard-27 +11 juv.
5. Blue-winged Teal-7
6. Cinnamon Teal-2
7. Northern Shoveler-1 f.
8. Green-winged Teal-5
9. Lesser Scaup-15
10. Ring-necked Duck-9
11. Bufflehead-3
12. Ruddy Duck-6
13. Pied-billed Grebe-1
14. Accipiter sp. Sharp-shinned Hawk?-1
15. Red-tailed Hawk-13
16. American Coot-7
17. Sora-5
18. Killdeer-1
19. SPOTTED SANDPIPER-9
20. WILSON’S SNIPE-6
21. Wilson’s Phalarope-4
22. Mourning Dove-2
23. Black Tern-16
24. Ruby-throated Hummingbird-1
25. Red-naped Sapsucker-2
26. Hairy Woodpecker-1
27. Northern Flicker-3
28. WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE-9
29. Alder Flycatcher-2
30. LEAST FLYCATCHER-10
31. Eastern Kingbird-6
32. Warbling Vireo-1
33. Black-billed Magpie-9
34. American Crow-12
35. Common Raven-6
36. Tree Swallow-55
37. Northern Rough-winged Swallow-2
38. Barn Swallow-3
39. Black-capped Chickadee-4
40. White-breasted Nuthatch-1
41. House Wren-10
42. Marsh Wren-1
43. Ruby-crowned Kinglet-2
44. Mountain Bluebird-20
45. Swainson’s Thrush-1
46. American Robin-14
47. European Starling-5
48. Tennessee Warbler-5
49. YELLOW WARBLER-8
50. Cape May Warbler-1
51. Chipping Sparrow-7
52. CLAY-COLORED SPARROW-13
53. Savannah Sparrow-6
54. Lincoln’s Sparrow-2
55. Rose-breasted Grosbeak-5
56. Red-winged Blackbird-178
57. Brewer’s Blackbird-25
58. Brown-headed Cowbird-17
59. BALTIMORE ORIOLE-3
60. Pine Siskin-49
61. AMERICAN GOLDFINCH-4
62. Evening Grosbeak-2
63. House Sparrow-4

Boreal Chorus Frogs, singing-at 5 locations.
Red Squirrel-2
Least Chipmunk-1
Richardson’s Ground Squirrel-6
Muskrat-2
White-tailed Deer-5

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