LaurieAnnie

LaurieAnnie

Posted on 03/09/2014


Photo taken on June 22, 2011


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art
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MetropolitanMuseum
2011
MMA
Cloisters
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Manhattan
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medieval
museum
sculpture
aquamanile
dragon
German


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Aquamanile in the Form of a Dragon in the Cloisters, June 2011

Aquamanile in the Form of a Dragon in the Cloisters, June 2011
Aquamanile in the Form of a Dragon

Date: ca. 1200

Culture: North German

Medium: Copper alloy

Dimensions: Overall: 8 3/4 x 7 1/4 in., 4365.108lb. (22.2 x 18.4 cm, 1980kg) Overall PD: 8 3/8 x 4 3/8 x 7 3/16 in. (21.2 x 11.1 x 18.2 cm) Thickness PD: 3/25 in. (0.3 cm)

Classification: Metalwork-Copper alloy

Credit Line: The Cloisters Collection, 1947

Accession Number: 47.101.51

Description: Aquamaniles, which are water vessels used for washing hands, served both liturgical and secular purposes. Those made in the shape of an animal are among the most distinctive products of medieval craftsmen. The most commonly seen zoomorphic aquamaniles are lions, but dragons, griffins, and many other forms were also produced (see acc. nos. 47.101.51, 1994.244).

This striking vessel represents a dragon, which is supported by its legs in front and on the tips of its wings behind, with a tail that curls up into a handle. It was filled through an opening in the tail, now missing its hinged cover. Water was poured out through the spout formed by the hooded or cowled figure held between the dragon's teeth. In addition to its visual power, this aquamanile is distinguished by fine casting, visible in the carefully chased dragon's scales and other surface details.

Text from: www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/471287

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