B C

B C

Posted on 11/17/2011


Photo taken on September 27, 2011


See also...


Keywords

Paula Deen
S.C.
Mt. Pleasant
LAW
VACATION
CHURCH
Holy City
Savannah
Charleston
Slavery
Confederacy
Mount Pleasant
Peninsula
South
Atlantic
James Island
Union Army
Fort Pulaski
Fort 54th Massachusetts Regiment
underground rail road
American Revoltion
U.S. Civil War
the Battery
Fort SUMTER
four corners of law
Meeting Street
North Charleston
EAST COST
Arthur Ravenel Bridge
trippin
Patriots Point
Georgia
South Carolina
planes
history
lost
tourist
trains
carriage
explore
town
harbor
travel
architecture
museum
trip
city
landmark
visitors
GPS
America
U.S.
USA
civil rights
kool
forts
cultural
plantations
tours
slaves
automobiles
historical
war memorial
flickr


Authorizations, license

Visible by: Everyone
Attribution + non Commercial + no derivative

76 visits

Quick trip down history lane in South Carolina and Georgia

Quick trip down history lane in South Carolina and Georgia
First African Baptist Church , Savannah, Georgia.
Unfortunately no picture taking was allowed. It's ashame they don't let you get pictures the place is rich with history.
The ceiling of the church is in the design of a “Nine Patch Quilt” which represented that the church was a safe house for slaves. Nine Patch Quilts also served as a map and guide informing people where to go next or what to look out for during their travel.

The holes in the floor are in the shape of an African prayer symbol known as a Congolese Cosmogram. In Africa, it also means “Flash of the Spirits” and represents birth, life, death, and rebirth.

Beneath the lower auditorium floor is another finished subfloor which is known as the “Underground Railroad”. There is 4ft of height between both floors. The entrance to the Underground Railroad remains unknown. After leaving our tunnel, slaves would try to make their way far north as possible. At one point in time people used to feed people through the holes to keep them nourished while in hiding. There are no records as to who went through the tunnel or how many....... firstafricanbc.com/history.asp

Comments