Xata

Xata

Posted on 11/05/2018


Photo taken on October 31, 2018


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Tradition for MM2

Tradition for MM2 

On NOVEMBER 1, 1478, Pope Sixtus IV issued the papal bull Exigit Sinceras Devotionis Affectus. He declared, “We are aware that in different cities in your kingdoms of Spain many of those who were regenerated by the sacred baptismal waters of their own free will have returned secretly to the observance of the laws and customs of the Jewish [faith]…because of the crimes of these men and the tolerance of the Holy. See towards them civil war, murder, and innumerable ills afflict your kingdoms.”
To eliminate this menace, the Pope gave Ferdinand and Isabella the permission to establish the authority of the Spanish Inquisition, first in Castile. Aragon soon followed.
The Inquisition would unite the nation with one common religion, Christianity, and with a common purpose, eradicating hidden Jews and Judaism within its borders. An added benefit: Conversos accused by the Inquisition had their property and wealth automatically confiscated.
The Pope’s edict launched the Spanish Inquisition, and authorized Ferdinand and Isabella to appoint inquisitors to investigate converts who were suspected of Judaizing, and to bring them and their accomplices to justice.
According to Professor Benzion Netanyahu’s The Origins of the Inquisition, between tens of thousands to as many as 600,000 Jews had converted by force or voluntarily in Spain by the period of the Inquisition. Whichever number is correct, Spain had found a common enemy that could be focused upon for quite a while (about 400 years), plus a substantial source of income to fund its continued wars, its adventures, and expeditions.
The papal bull led to a royal decree two years later that reaffirmed the Inquisition’s role to search out and punish converts from Judaism who secretly kept Jewish beliefs in their heart.
And in 1483 the plan came to fruition with the appointment of one the cruelest, most malevolent men in history, Grand Inquisitor Tomas de Torquemada.
The Inquisition was underway.

Christians began to call Jewish converts "the new Christians" in order to distinguish them from the "old Christians," that is, from themselves. Jewish converts to Christianity were derogatorily called "converts" or, worse still, "marranos," meaning "pigs".
The basic accusation was that these Jews were not real converts to Christianity, since they practiced Judaism clandestinely. And that actually used to be what happened. There were large numbers of Jews who appeared to be Christians but continued in secret with the practice of Judaism.

All over the American continent there are people descended from Spanish or Portuguese settlers who have strange customs that they cannot explain. For example, despite being Catholic, on Friday night they go to the attic to light candles. They don't know the origin of the custom, but they do it anyway. It is clear that these people are descended from Jews who pretended to be Christians but continued to practice Jewish rituals clandestinely.
The aim of the Inquisition was to find these people, torture them until they admitted their crime and then kill them.

The use of the capirote or coroza was prescribed in Spain and Portugal by the holy office of Inquisition. Men and women who were arrested had to wear a paper capirote in public as sign of public humiliation. The capirote was worn during the session of an Auto-da-fé. The colour was different, conforming to the judgement of the office. People who were condemned to be executed wore a red coroza. Other punishments used different colours.

During Easter and other festivities like November 1st "new christians" lived in terror because they were often victims of catholic fanatism and usually enclose themselves home not to be seen, hoping no fanatic group would pretext anything to go after them.

Credits: By Tribunal del Santo Oficio de la Inquisición - Enciclopedia Española, Public Domain, commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2448614
www.aishlatino.com/judaismo/historia/curso-rapido/La-Inquisicion.html

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FORTUNATELY THIS IS PAST...

I AM ONE OF THEIR DESCENDENTS AND EVEN IF I DO NOT BELIEVE IN ANY GOD I LIGHT MY CANDLE EVERY FRIDAY EVENING IN MEMORY AND RESPECT FOR MY ANCESTORS WHO PUT THEIR LIVES AT RISK BY DOING SO.

IN OUR PRESENT TIMES WERE INTOLERANCE IS RAISING UP AGAIN WE SHOULD LOOK BACK AT HISTORY AND DO WHAT WE CAN IN ORDER TO AVOID SUCH A DARK FUTURE...


The little figure of the capirote is 10 cm tall

Gudrun, Ruebenkraut, Halvor Olsen, Wierd Folkersma and 24 other people have particularly liked this photo


47 comments - The latest ones
Bearfoto
Bearfoto
Powerful post, Xata. Agree about the intolerance!
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Bearfoto
Obrigada Bearfoto
8 days ago.
Anji.
Anji.
Et un grand merci pour les commentaires !
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Anji.
De nada Anji... obrigada por perceberes
8 days ago.
Boro
Boro
Joli partage !
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Boro
Obrigada Boro
8 days ago.
Marie-claire Gallet
Marie-claire Gallet
Very interesting, Isabel !! Thank you for sharing ! I agree with you, we have something to learn from the past, but many forget this !!! Great macro !!! HMM !
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Marie-claire Gallet
If we ignore our history we condemn ourselves to live it again.... obrigada Marie Claire
8 days ago.
Sami Serola
Sami Serola
Horrible history! =(

I learned much new thanks to the story =)
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Sami Serola
Glad you did Sami, part of the work I told you about is on the theme...
8 days ago.
Jaap van 't Veen
Jaap van 't Veen
Beautiful details.
Thank you for the story.
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Jaap van 't Veen
Obrigada Jaap...
8 days ago.
Katja
Katja
Religion ist was schreckliches
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Katja
Can be indeed....
8 days ago.
William Sutherland
William Sutherland
Excellent shot but a simply evil chapter of history.

Admired in:
www.ipernity.com/group/tolerance
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to William Sutherland
History is full of them... obrigada William
8 days ago.
neira-Dan
neira-Dan
belle capture !! il y a parfois des souvenirs très sombres
8 days ago. Edited 8 days ago.
Xata has replied to neira-Dan
History is full of darkness, Neira... obrigada
8 days ago.
Percy Schramm
Percy Schramm
A great macro and a very interesting history !
8 days ago.
Annemarie
Annemarie
beautiful interesting add to the topic!
HMM:)
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Annemarie
Obrigada Annemarie
8 days ago.
Thorsten aka T.S-B.
Thorsten aka T.S-B.
A great contribution with an explanation that makes you think.
HMM!
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Thorsten aka T.S-B.
Obrigada Thorsten, make think is the purpose
8 days ago.
Henry L ( k4eyv )
Henry L ( k4eyv )
Thank You for this commentary reminding us all.
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Henry L ( k4eyv )
Obrigada Henry for u derstanding ans appreciating
8 days ago.
Ulrich John
Ulrich John
Fine shot and a very interesting text, Isabel !
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Ulrich John
Obrigada Ulrich, glad you appreciated
8 days ago.
J.Garcia
J.Garcia
Excelente testemunho, Isabel
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to J.Garcia
Obrigada Judite
8 days ago.
fragglerocks
fragglerocks
EXcellent photograph and amazing history in your text.
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to fragglerocks
Obrigada Fraggle, history is full of darkness...
8 days ago.
Diana Australis
Diana Australis
What a fascinating and enlightening piece of information, Isabel. Thank you for sharing
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Diana Australis
Obrigada Diana, thanks for appreciating
8 days ago.
Valfal
Valfal
A very dark period of Christian history for sure. Thank you for sharing the traditions sprung from that time. HMM, Isabel
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Valfal
Obrigada Val, all religions have their darkness...
8 days ago.
Janano -
Janano -
Interesting and thought provoking Isabel. Thanks for sharing!
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Janano -
Obrigada Janano, it was the purpose
8 days ago.
Wierd Folkersma
Wierd Folkersma
very interesting story and really a frightening mask and cloth
8 days ago.
Xata has replied to Wierd Folkersma
Still today as a tradition in de “Semana Santa”... www.ipernity.com/doc/xata/12500316/in/album/214384
obrigada Wierd
8 days ago.
L. L. Wall
L. L. Wall
... and yet, in the turmoil of dark acts through the ages, this figurine is reminiscent of the garb worn by the Ku Klux Klan in their persecution of people-of-color for a hundred years after the American Civil War ...
7 days ago.
Xata has replied to L. L. Wall
I keep this small capirote home as a reminder and to explain some people about it. Intolerance has been there all the time throughout history and is still there, active in some places and in most of the people, dormant on others. Being intolerant is in human nature, it is linked to basic survival: education, knowledge and reflection is our way to control it.
Obrigada LL
7 days ago. Edited 7 days ago.
Berny
Berny
What a terrible history, intolerance is inherent in almost any religion.....
7 days ago.
John Sheldon
John Sheldon
Bravo for presenting history honestly! Yes, education, knowledge and reflection is the way to tolerance. The problem is that we seem to be programmed to be 'tribal' - and of course this tribal instinct is a gift to for 'leaders' who want to manipulate others. We can see this over and over again in world history including the history that is being made everyday now.
7 days ago.
Xata has replied to John Sheldon
I see you understand history and humanity in the same way I do. With globalization leaders are preparing an army of consumers-slaves for their (leaders) own benefit... and people are so blind that they walk willingly in that path...
Obrigada John
5 days ago.
John Sheldon has replied to Xata
Obrigado!
2 days ago.
Ruebenkraut
Ruebenkraut
Thanks for the history lesson!
6 days ago.
Xata has replied to Ruebenkraut
Obrigada Henning
5 days ago.