Wolfgang

Wolfgang

Posted on 07/02/2008


Photo taken on March 14, 2006



See also...

YIN & YANG YIN & YANG


Global Culture Community Global Culture Community


No comment No comment


Asie Asie


Photo and Pictures Photo and Pictures


www.digital-photoworld.de www.digital-photoworld.de


150 Views 150 Views


PHOTOS OF INTEREST PHOTOS OF INTEREST


Ysplix Ysplix


Thailand and its tradition Thailand and its tradition


300-400 Views 300-400 Views


250+ Visits 250+ Visits


3+ Faves 3+ Faves


animals (no dogs, no cats) animals (no dogs, no cats)


Animals of the world Animals of the world


La Boca La Boca


Unforgettable places Unforgettable places


Asia Travel - Are You ? Asia Travel - Are You ?


Thailand Thailand


Animal Photos Animal Photos


Nikon Nikon


Travel Photo Forum Travel Photo Forum


Travel Photography Travel Photography


See more...

Keywords

Thailand
Tiger
Tiger Temple
Kanchanaburi


Authorizations, license

Visible by: Everyone
All rights reserved

861 visits

Inside the Tiger Temple

Inside the Tiger Temple
The Tiger Temple is called Wat Pa Luangta Bua Yannasampanno Forest Monastery and was established by the Abbot-Phra Acharn Phusit (Chan) Kanthitharo in 1994.

Since its opening Wat Pa Luangta Bua gained a reputation as a wildlife sanctuary. It started with an injured wild fowl given to the monk by the villagers, then peacocks came attracted by the calls of by then rather large colony of wild fowl. An injured wild boar stumbled in to the monastery and the monks cared for him until he could be released back into the forest. The next day he came back followed by his family group of about 10 animals. By now a countless number of boar find shelter in the monastery. Villagers also started to bring in unwanted pets: four species of deer moved in, followed by buffalo, cow, horses, wild goat and gibbons. All these animals are roaming the grounds of the monastery freely.

The first tiger cub arrived to the monastery in February 1999. It was a female cub of Indochinese subspecies (Tigris corbetti) and her condition was very poor. When she was only a few months old her mother was killed by poachers near the Thai-Burma border. The cub was sold to and the new owner ordered her stuffed. A local was hired to do the job, which fortunately he did not finish. Although he injected her in the neck with the preservative formalin the cub survived. When she arrived to the to the monastery she was frail and terrified of a slightest sound. She still has stitches in the cuts on her head. Her vision was impaired and her teeth were already worn, particularly the fangs, which appeared as if they have been filed down to the gum, blood oozing from the roots. Eating was a difficult task for her - she could hardly move her tongue, chew and swallow her food. Inspite of her condition she has never once attacked anyone. Under loving care of the monks the cub recovered, but in July 1999 she fell seriously ill with heart palpitations and died.

Love Song, - RP - have particularly liked this photo


Comments
Wolfgang
Wolfgang
I get a new friendship

Contrary to my visits in 1999 and 2006, my most recent visit to the temple was a negative experience:

In the meantime, the temple has become a mass tourism destination. The entrance fee just for the temple is 600 baht per head now, and even a child of 18 months age has to pay the same. Only Thai citizens are exempt, they pay 300 baht. Please bear in mind that keeping wild animals including tigers (which is illegal in Thailand) is very costly. At the same time, Thai authorities are doing their best to delay legalizing this location as long as possible, allowing them to make more money by demanding a large portion of the temple’s income from tourist visits under the table.

And last, but not least:

There’s nothing wrong in maintaining a temple for orphaned animals, and also earning the necessary income by charging entrance fees to support the temple and the animals is ok. I do however criticise local authorities for keeping the temple’s activities illegal. The only purpose for doing so is to gain access to a large part of the temple’s income, so that unscrupulous local officers can fill their pockets – and that’s certainly not ok.
7 years ago. Edited 7 years ago.
Love Song
Love Song
Super compo *_* J*******
5 years ago.