W9JIM - Jim Doss

W9JIM - Jim Doss

Posted on 01/30/2014


Photo taken on April 11, 2013



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Canon EOS 7D Canon EOS 7D


RUINES RUINES


Death Valley National Park Death Valley National Park


Abandoned Abandoned



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w9jim
dvnp
death valley
phinney canyon
phinney mine
abandoned
nevada triangle
mine
tunnel


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Phinney Mine

Phinney Mine
The Phinney Mine, located about eighteen miles northwest of Rhyolite in the Grapevine Mountains, is the site of a small-scale, two-man mining attempt during the 1930s. The mine was first located by Charles E. and F. C. Phinney of Beatty in 1930, and between then and the end of operations in 1938, the two men managed to ship out approximately fifty tons of ore worth $17 per ton--for a grand total of $850. Not surprisingly, with the advent of better times towards the end of the depression era, the Phinney Mine was abandoned, and Charles Phinney moved to Beatty, where he died in 1952.

Copied from the National Park Service website.

slgwv, Tim Hanko, XOZ have particularly liked this photo


Comments
XOZ
XOZ
Amazing!
3 years ago.
W9JIM - Jim Doss
W9JIM - Jim Doss
Thanks, Heather!

Yes, all the way back. It's not all that extensive.
3 years ago.
Meadowmom
Meadowmom
What a huge amount of work for a small return. Makes me reflect on a psychological aspect of the Great Depression (appearing again, I think, in our present Great Recession).

I was aware of this as a kid: It was so desperate to be out of work and rejected again and again. Especially on the men, The women scrubbed harder, mended harder, cooked harder. The men had no purpose.

To me, that's why these old desert mines from the '30s are so poignant. All that physical labor for almost no money was better than nothing.
3 years ago. Edited 3 years ago.
slgwv
slgwv
A lot of work for $850--even in the Depression.
3 years ago.