Stormlizard

Stormlizard

Posted on 03/30/2016


Photo taken on October 29, 2008


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Hiroshima Castle O29-01

Hiroshima Castle O29-01
Photographed 10 29 2008, using Canon Digital IXUS 400.
Hiroshima Castle, sometimes called Carp Castle was a castle in Hiroshima, Japan which was the home of the daimyō (feudal lord) of the Hiroshima Han (fief). The castle was constructed in the 1590s, but was destroyed by the atomic bombing on 6 August 1945. It was rebuilt in 1958, a replica of the original which now serves as a museum of Hiroshima's history prior to World War II.
History. Mōri Terumoto, one of Toyotomi Hideyoshi’s council of Five Elders, established Hiroshima castle in 1589 at the delta of the Otagawa river. There was no Hiroshima city or town at the time, and the area was called Gokamura, meaning 'five villages.' Beginning in 1591, Mōri governed nine provinces from this castle, including much of what is now Shimane, Yamaguchi, Tottori, Okayama and Hiroshima Prefectures.
When construction on the castle began, Gokamura was renamed Hiroshima, as a more impressive name was called for. "Hiro" was taken from Ōe no Hiromoto, an ancestor of the Mōri family, and "Shima" was taken from Fukushima Motonaga, who helped Mōri Terumoto choose the castle site. Some accounts state that the name 'Hiroshima', meaning literally 'wide island' comes from the existence of several large islands in the delta of the Otagawa, near the castle's site.
Following the battle of Sekigahara in 1600, Mōri was forced out of the castle, retreating to Hagi in today's Yamaguchi prefecture, Fukushima Masanori became the lord of Aki and Bingo provinces (which today comprise Hiroshima prefecture) and of Hiroshima castle. However, the new Tokugawa shogunate forbade any castle construction without permission from Edo, this was part of how the shogunate kept the daimyō from gaining power and overthrowing the shogunate. When Fukushima repaired the castle following a flood in 1619, he was dispatched to Kawanakajima in today's Nagano prefecture, Asano Nagaakira then became lord of the castle.
From 1619 until the abolition of the feudal system during the Meiji Restoration (1869), the Asano family were lords of Aki and Bingo provinces.
After the Meiji Restoration, the castle came to serve as a military facility, and the Imperial General Headquarters was based there during the First Sino-Japanese War in 1894–1895. The foundations of several of the GHQ outbuildings, just a few hundred paces from the castle's main tower, remain today.
During the final months of World War II, the castle served as the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division to deter the projected Allied invasion of the Japanese mainland, thus making a castle, along with other military and industrial facilities in the city, a legitimate military target. As a result, it was destroyed in the atomic bomb blast of August 6, 1945, and for many years, it was believed the castle structure was blown away by the explosion that destroyed Hiroshima, but newly discovered evidence suggests the explosion only destroyed the lower pillars of the castle, and the rest of it collapsed as a result. The present tower, constructed largely of concrete, was completed in 1958.
John.

Michel, Martin Humphreys, I Holzi, Claudine Gaulier-Denis and 7 other people have particularly liked this photo


26 comments - The latest ones
Gudrun
Gudrun
An impressive building with an equally impressive history- thanks for the explanations!
2 years ago.
Stormlizard has replied to Gudrun
Thank you too Gudrun, you are most welcome.
2 years ago.
HappySnapper
HappySnapper
Impressive building with a long history, The documentary takes some reading.
2 years ago.
Stormlizard has replied to HappySnapper
Thank you Maurice, yes to both but I think most like to learn about such things.
2 years ago.
Zsuzsa
Zsuzsa
Wonderful!
2 years ago.
Stormlizard has replied to Zsuzsa
Thank you very much Zsuzsa.
2 years ago.
John Lawrence
John Lawrence
Superb picture John, Your narrative is very impressive and covers the history well from the early years to the present date, an enjoyable read, Thanks
2 years ago.
Stormlizard has replied to John Lawrence
Thank you very much John, you are most welcome.
2 years ago.
Chs Serge
Chs Serge
Un bel ensemble architectural et un très bon commentaire
2 years ago.
Stormlizard has replied to Chs Serge
Merci beaucoup Serge,vous êtes bienvenue
2 years ago.
Judith Jannetta
Judith Jannetta
A poignant reminder.....
2 years ago.
Stormlizard has replied to Judith Jannetta
Yes Gudrun, very much so. It was stll a heap of rubble when I first visited Hiroshima.
2 years ago.
Jaap van 't Veen
Jaap van 't Veen
Amazing architecture; Thanks for the info.
Congrats on Explore.
2 years ago.
Stormlizard has replied to Jaap van 't Veen
Thank you very much Jaap, you are most welcome.
2 years ago.
Ron Hanko
Ron Hanko
Interesting information and nice that they rebuilt it.
2 years ago.
Stormlizard has replied to Ron Hanko
Thank you Ron,
Yes it was good, there are others that were parly destroyed due to bombing in WW II such as in Nagoya, they have also been rebuilt.
2 years ago.
Alda
Alda
Such a fantastic architecture!!
2 years ago.
Stormlizard has replied to Alda
Yes Alda, I like it very much.
2 years ago.
Stormlizard
Stormlizard
@ Lebojo,
Thank you.
2 years ago.
Stormlizard
Stormlizard
@ Coffee please,
Thank you Natasha.
2 years ago.
Stormlizard
Stormlizard
@ Claudine.Gaulier-Denis,
Merci beaucoup.
2 years ago.
Stormlizard
Stormlizard
@ i Holzi,
Thank you.
2 years ago.
Michelle Chouchou
Michelle Chouchou
Magnifique !!!
2 years ago.
Stormlizard has replied to Michelle Chouchou
Merci beaucoup Michelle.
2 years ago.
Stormlizard
Stormlizard
@ Martin Humphreys,
Thank you Martin.
2 years ago.
Stormlizard
Stormlizard
@ Michel (Capture-85),
Thank you Michel.
2 years ago.