Mike

Mike

Posted on 06/02/2014


Photo taken on May 31, 2014


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Cincinnati
Pride 2014
Pride?
religion


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Happy Pride! Wait, what?

Happy Pride! Wait, what?
Someone on the parade committee though it would be okay to allow this church to pay an entry fee and join in on the "pride" parade. Yeah, no so much...

In any event in posting this years pride photos I figured I'd get all the hate and nonsense out of the way first

one42chrisp has particularly liked this photo


10 comments - The latest ones
one42chrisp
one42chrisp
A very strange entry for a Pride Parade indeed! I don't think I'll be seeing the same sort of thing in our parade next Saturday!
3 years ago.
Mike has replied to one42chrisp
There's a few more but they get one photo on my photo stream and this was the best one. I've seen enough of these folks before they got there lol.

I'm actually still a bit floored, I was shocked when this rolled up, I really was.
3 years ago.
one42chrisp has replied to Mike
It is a bit bizarre, I can't imagine what the organizers were thinking, unless they wanted the group to show their ignorance to the amassed crowds.
3 years ago.
Mike has replied to one42chrisp
Seems the organizers may have been duped, I dunno.. I just hope they figure it out so it doesn't happen again. This kind of "float" has no place in a pride parade.
3 years ago.
Clint
Clint
This is--sadly--more along the lines of what I'd have expected a Cincinnati pride parade to be like. Just a bunch of these guys.
3 years ago.
Mike has replied to Clint
I've forgotten a lot of what it used to be like. I left the area soon after high school and haven't returned until recently. It's evolving and has changed drastically from the 80's and 90's. A pride parade or being open about much of anything other than which high school or church you attended was pretty much out of the question. Traditionally this is a very conservative, "family friendly" city. It is evolving to some extent from what I see and know but it still has a way to go with elements such as this.
3 years ago. Edited 3 years ago.
Don Barrett (aka DBs travels)
Don Barrett (aka DBs…
a) It's bizarre, but b) being on pride organizing committees years ago, I remember how convoluted the reasoning could be to try to work with every potential constituency.
3 years ago.
Clint
Clint
My memory on this is vague, but I remember back in the late-'80s or early-'90s (you might have left already) when there were a series of big controversies after Cincinnati tried prohibiting the KKK from marching in some city parade. The Klan sued, and the city lost on First Amendment grounds and were forced to let the Klan march. Later, ther were forced by the courts to let the Klan erect a cross in Fountain Square. I don't know whether the Cincy Pride Parade is a private entity and how that would affect things, but my only theory for allowing this is that the city still feels burned by that case and is reluctant to prohibit anybody from participating.

Then again, I could just as easily believe that this is just Cincinnati and par for the course.
3 years ago.
Don Barrett (aka DBs… has replied to Clint
Interesting background, I vaguely remember that Klan controversy. I suspect that situation, and this, might be related to the fact of Ohio being in the fairly conservative 6th [federal] Circuit Court.

I believe that all Pride events are still run by local non-profits (that's definitely the case with the parades in California). But, because the city gives the permit for using the streets, first amendment religious expression rights probably apply. It's interesting, though, that I know of no other instance of this happening. Both LA and San Diego have comparatively large segments of viewing area set aside for religious protesters, but I haven't heard of a demand to be in the parade. It could be that Cincinnati was a test to try to set a precedent for a new way for the religious right to interfere with gay rights. (Note that the only protection of gays in Cincinnati is in employment (similar at the state level), otherwise discrimination against gays is legal.)

An interesting aside is that demands by gay organizations to be in the St. Patrick's day parade in NYC are still resulting in convoluted ways to limit their participation.
3 years ago.
Rhisiart Hincks
Rhisiart Hincks
I am all for free speech, but extreme views need to be challenged politely but firmly.

I wan't raised to go to church at all but in my teens, as many, I came under the influence of Christianity, and having read the New Testament for myself, I came to the pathetic conclusion that homosexual feelings were against God's will and sinful, as it does day that even it doesn't really mean it.

Even more ridiculously, I actually believed that having faith would enable me to overcome any evil thoughts. I remember feeling desperately remorseful, and I will never forgive Christianity for its misleading and ambiguous Bible or for its empty promises.

I don't say that religion doesn't help some people and give them comfort, as it does, but I think it has created centuries of guilt even without the threat of hell.
3 years ago.