Meadowmom

Meadowmom

Posted on 04/26/2015


Photo taken on July  8, 2015


See also...

Mining Heritage Mining Heritage


Death Valley National Park Death Valley National Park



Keywords

dugout
Death Valley
cousin-jack
Lost Burro Mine
Cornish diaspora


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Photo replaced on July  8, 2015
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Cousin-jack

Cousin-jack
At Lost Burro Mine, Death Valley.

Mining in the Mojave Desert was sometimes amateurish and very dangerous, until the Cornishmen came. They were sturdy, tough, uneducated, fleeing terrible conditions at home in England, and they knew mining. The Americans called the immigrant miners "Cousin Jacks." The name also became attached to these simple dugout dwellings, which a lot of other people lived in too.

In the California mountains and deserts, Cornish influence remains. There's still an annual Cornish festival up in Grass Valley. Whenever we pass through we pick up real Cornish pasties from the little shop there (or in Elko, Nevada.)

More stories in my album, Speaking of Death Valley.

RQ 01012015, tiabunna, Judith Jannetta, Pam J have particularly liked this photo


9 comments - The latest ones
slgwv
slgwv
And gave its name to the Devonian Lost Burro Formation...
2 years ago.
Pam J
Pam J
Cornwall is my heart home. My first husband was a Cornishman.. and I spent holidays there from a few months old too.

There is a saying that where ever there is a mine... no matter WHAT it is mining.. you will find a Cornishman.

The Engine Houses are my places of peace.. the Cornish mines hold many Spirits
2 years ago.
Meadowmom
Meadowmom
Thanks, Pam...I just learned something new: Cornish Engine Houses! What distinctive architecture! I'm not sure that shape of building is found anywhere else in the world.
2 years ago. Edited 2 years ago.
tarboat
tarboat
Thanks for joining the Mining Heritage group. Interesting to read the caption to this one. Cornish pasties are a must when in Cornwall and in certain parts of the USA it seems!
2 years ago.
Judith Jannetta
Judith Jannetta
I love any landscape where man has tried to get the better of it and failed.......Cornish miners took their knowhow and influence far and wide
2 years ago.
slgwv
slgwv
As Laurie notes, there are still pastie bakeries in the Mother Lode country. Back when my wife worked in meat inspection for the US Dept. of Agriculture a couple of her plants were pastie makers--in Grass Valley IIRC.
It also shows how grim conditions must've been in Cornwall for hardrock mining in California to look more attractive! And to show how deep their influence went, the traditional terminology of mining in the western US is an odd amalgam of Cornish and Mexican-Spanish terms.
2 years ago. Edited 2 years ago.
Bob Taylor
Bob Taylor
Picture and the ensuing commentary, all wonderfully informative and lively.
2 years ago.
tiabunna
tiabunna
Interesting story. The Cornish miners also found their way out here - as did Cornish pasties.
2 years ago.
Boro
Boro
Excellente ++++
19 months ago.