maorlando (Angela)

maorlando (Angela)

Posted on 07/18/2013


Photo taken on July 15, 2013


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Flowers
Summer
Texas
Blooms
Bluebells
Wildflowers
Texas Wildflowers


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Raindrops on Bluebells

Raindrops on Bluebells
Anytime you see the word "grandiflorurn" included in the scientific name of a flower, it should get your attention -- the word indicates large blooms. This is certainly an accurate description of Texas bluebell (Eustoma grandiflorurn), sometimes called "lisianthus." With its tulip-shaped blooms and its rich color (usually a deep blue to almost purple), bluebell is considered by many to be our state's most beautiful wildflower. It is easy to see why that argument is a strong one. The Bluebell can be found growing over most of Texas (except the most arid areas). It likes fertile, prairie-type soil (you will not often find it growing in deep sand) and needs at least a moderate amount of moisture. It can tolerate wet conditions, but not standing water. This one is a great choice for coastal areas where drainage is less than perfect. It will be found growing on rolling hills, on the slopes and around the bottoms of the slopes. The Bluebell is an upright, clumping-type plant, usually reaching a height of around 1 to 2 feet -- occasionally slightly taller. Over the years, I have had the opportunity to regularly observe colonies of bluebell in the Grimes County area, all around Navasota, Anderson and Roans Prairie. Apparently, conditions are very favorable for bluebell -- it appears to do extremely well here. Even so, there will be considerable variation from year to year, depending on conditions. Some years, those hills seem to be almost a solid sheet of gorgeous blue -- other years, the flowers may be pretty sparse. One reason Texas Bluebells are not as common now as they once were is due to their beauty. People have literally picked them from the wild in such numbers that the wild populations have been unable to reseed in their native habitat.
See: www.texasgardener.com/pastissues/julaug02/blue.html
and www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=EUEXR

And the rest of the story.....
Our fantastic delicious Blue Bell Ice Cream made in Brenham, Texas...
well here's the scoop... ha ha... on the name:
It all started on a hot summer day when local farmers decided to establish the
Brenham Creamery Company and make butter from excess cream brought in
by area farmers. Blue Bell Creameries, based in Brenham, Texas,
opened its doors in 1907. A few years later, the creamery began making ice
cream and delivering it to neighbors by horse and wagon. It was in 1930 that
the company changed its name to Blue Bell Creameries after the native
Texas bluebell wildflower.

See: www.bluebell.com/the_little_creamery/our_history.html

Sylvie Coeffic, Light Scholar, Dave Roberts 2014, Jose Luis Sánchez Nielfa and 2 other people have particularly liked this photo


7 comments - The latest ones
Jack Renwall
Jack Renwall
Beautiful capture..
4 years ago.
koaxial
koaxial
beautiful!!
4 years ago.
Dagmar
Dagmar
Beautiful
4 years ago.
Jose Luis Sánchez Nielfa
Jose Luis Sánchez Ni…
Preciosa, refrescante, buen trabajo.
4 years ago.
Dave Roberts 2014
Dave Roberts 2014
Wonderful colour and nice focus, a great capture of the droplets!
4 years ago.
Glenn T. Coleman
Glenn T. Coleman
Gorgeous Purple Flower, fantastic Information!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
3 years ago.
Sylvie Coeffic
Sylvie Coeffic
**************** :-)
23 months ago.