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Keywords

art
hydria
2018
Virginia
Greek
VA
Richmond
pottery
terracotta
clay
ceramic
museum
painting
vase
ancient
Medusa
monster
gorgon
mythology
Classical
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Red-Figure Hydria Attributed to the Nausikaa Painter in the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, June 2018

Red-Figure Hydria Attributed to the Nausikaa Painter in the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, June 2018
Red-Figure Hydria (Water Jug) (Primary Title)

attributed to, Nausikaa Painter (Artist)

Date: 450 BC

Culture: Greek (Attic)

Category: Ceramics
Containers-Vessels

Medium: terracotta

Collection: Ancient Art

Dimensions: Overall: 17 1/2 × 13 in. (44.45 × 33.02 cm)

Object Number: 62.1.1


“Now Medusa alone was mortal; for that reason Perseus was sent to fetch her head.” – Apollodorus, Library, 2.4.2


Medusa was one of three Gorgons, snake-haired monsters who turned all who gazed upon them into stone. The hero Perseus chopped off Medusa’s head with the help of the divinities Athena (shown here with her helmet and shield) and Hermes (holding his caduceus). Perseus kept the head in a magic pouch (held in his left hand) until he gave it to the Athena, who placed it on her aegis (a magically protective garment).


Text from: www.vmfa.museum/piction/6027262-12958509

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