Jonathan Cohen

Jonathan Cohen

Posted on 06/24/2015


Photo taken on April 28, 2014



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Keywords

streetscape
Sohmer Piano Building
Neo-classical architecture
Beaux-Arts architecture
22nd Street
Madison Square Park
Fifth Avenue
New York City
New York
United States
USA
cityscape
Sohmer Building


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The Sohmer Piano Building – 170 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York

The Sohmer Piano Building – 170 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York
The Sohmer Piano Building, or Sohmer Building, is a 13-storey, Neo-classical Beaux-Arts building located at 170 Fifth Avenue at East 22nd Street, in the Flatiron District neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan, diagonally southwest of the Flatiron Building. Designed by Robert Maynicke as a store-and-loft building for real-estate developer Henry Corn, and built in 1897-98 it is easily recognizable by its gold dome, which sits on top of a 2-story octagonal cupola.

The building was named for the Sohmer Piano Company, which had its offices and showroom there early in the building’s history. Sohmer & Co. was a piano manufacturing company founded in New York in 1872. Sohmer & Co. marketed the first modern baby grand piano, and also manufactured pianos with aliquot stringing and bridge agraffes, as well as Cecilian "all-inside" player pianos and Welte-Mignon-Licensee reproducing pianos. Sohmer pianos were owned by U.S. President Calvin Coolidge, and composers Victor Herbert and Irving Berlin. Sohmer is now a line of pianos manufactured by Samick Music Corporation in Korea.

Other tenants included architects, publishers, and merchants of leather, hats, perfume and upholstery. It was converted to residential condominium apartments in the early 21st century, and its architectural features were restored between 2002 and 2005.

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Comments
╰☆☆June☆☆╮
╰☆☆June☆☆╮
Great ;-)
Your beautiful capture was admired in Historical & Architectural Gems.
2 years ago.