Jonathan Cohen

Jonathan Cohen

Posted on 01/26/2014


Photo taken on November 17, 2012



See also...

WORLD RELIGIONS WORLD RELIGIONS


Visit at a MUSEUM or EXHIBITION Visit at a MUSEUM or EXHIBITION


Toronto Toronto


Metropolis Metropolis


O Canada! O Canada!



Keywords

museum
carnival masks
Bloor Street
Trinidad and Tobago
mad cow
Royal Ontario Museum
Ontario
ROM
Trinidad
Toronto
Canada
folk art
cow
carnival
costume
Brian Mac Farlane


Authorizations, license

Visible by: Everyone
All rights reserved

191 visits

Mad Cow – Royal Ontario Museum, Bloor Street, Toronto, Ontario

Mad Cow – Royal Ontario Museum, Bloor Street, Toronto, Ontario
The Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) is a museum of world culture and natural history based in Toronto, Ontario. It is one of the largest museums in North America, attracting over one million visitors every year.

This exhibit entitled "Carnival – From Emancipation to Celebration" presented a selection of costumes from Brian Mac Farlane’s creations for the Trinidad Carnival from 2010 to 2012. Mac Farlane is a major Carnival artist from Trinidad and Tobago, whose designs and installations have dazzled and inspired people all over the world. Mac Farlane’s last three seasons were inspired by an historical reflection on traditional Carnival characters and their ability to embody broader social and political issues.

In the 18th century, enslaved Africans were banned from Christian festivities of the French and British colonists. They held their own celebrations in barrack yards and, after the 1834 abolition of slavery was fully implemented in the Caribbean in 1838, the freed Africans together with people of Asian origin took their Carnival to the street. This costume, entitled "Mad Cow," is a contemporary reinterpretation of a traditional Trinidadian carnival character. Mad cows frolic through the crowd making head-butting motions, contributing to the general chaos of the festival and causing a ruckus.

The exhibition also commemorated John Graves Simcoe, the first Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada (as Ontario was known then). Simcoe abolished slavery in Upper Canada in 1793 – some 40 years before it was done away with elsewhere within the British Empire.

Comments