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iPod Shuffle - The Passion Of Lovers

iPod Shuffle - The Passion Of Lovers
Passion Of Lovers - "Bauhaus" - Play this track here.

¿Whats this iPod Shuffle set all about? Read about it here

Bauhaus were an English band from Northampton between 1978 and 1983. The group were Peter Murphy on vox, Daniel Ash on guitar, Kevin Haskins on drums and David J on bass. After break up some members continued as 'Love and Rockets'.

Originally called 'Bauhaus 1919' (a reference to the German Bauhaus art movement of the 1920s, because of its "stylistic implications and associations"), the date was soon dropped. With the ultimate dark and gloomy sound and image, Bauhaus I think, are generally considered the first proper gothic rock group.

Together for only six weeks, Bauhaus entered the studio for the first time at Beck Studios in Wellingborough to record a seminal demo. Five songs were recorded, one of the tracks from the session, "Bela Lugosi's Dead", running more than nine minutes, was released as the group's debut single in August 1979 on Small Wonder Records as Bauhaus. It stayed on the British independent charts for two years. The song received crucial airplay on BBC Radio 1 and DJ John Peel's evening show, and Bauhaus was subsequently asked to record a session for Peel's show, which was broadcast on January 3rd, 1980.

This single, "The Passion of Lovers" peaked at number 56 and came from the second album, 'Mask' (1981). The band employed more keyboards and a variety of other instruments to add to the diversity of the record. In an unconventional move, the group shot a video for the album's title track as a promotional tool for the band as a whole and not any specific song from the record. My original 7" has a lyric sheet if the listener felt they would like to sing along(!).

In my opinion Bauhaus never received the critical regognicion they deserved. To appreciate the band, check out the excellent live cut 'Press the Eject and Give Me the Tape'. Alternatively, track down 'Swing the Heartache: The BBC Sessions'. Oh, and tell 'em I sent you!

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The story of St George and the Dragon was a legend brought back with the Crusaders and retold with the courtly appurtenances belonging to the genre of Romance. The earliest known depiction of the legend is from early 11th century Cappadocia, (in the iconography of the Eastern Orthodox Church, George had been depicted as a Roman soldier since at least the 7th century); the earliest known surviving narrative text is an eleventh-century Georgian text.

A dragon or Crocodile creature makes its nest at the spring that provides water for the city of "Silene" (perhaps modern Cyrene) in Libya or the city of Lydda, depending on the source. Consequently, the citizens have to dislodge the dragon from its nest for a time, to collect water. To do so, each day they offer the dragon at first a sheep, and if no sheep can be found, then a beautiful maiden must go instead of the sheep.

The victim is chosen by drawing lots. One day, this happens to be the princess. The monarch begs for her life to be spared, but to no avail. She is offered to the dragon, but there appears Saint George on his travels. He faces the dragon, protects himself with the sign of the cross, slays the dragon, and rescues the princess. The grateful citizens abandon their ancestral paganism and convert to Christianity.

The St George's Cross is a white flag with a red cross, he is Englands patron saint and the feast day is on April 23rd. The Barmy Army are keen carriers of the flag, supporters of the England cricket team, who beyond many predictions have retained the Ashes this week. So its quite appropriate I have slipped a little bit of symbolism into this post. If you are one of my Antipodean cousins and have managed to read this far, 'Sorry! se

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