HairyHippy

HairyHippy

Posted on 02/07/2014


Photo taken on February  7, 2014


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Keywords

England
Ticket Machine
EVOLT-40
E-10
Tim Pickford-Jones
Digital
Transport
United Kingdom
Olympus
Bus
Photoshop
UK
Almex


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P863 Ticket Machine - Almex

P863 Ticket Machine - Almex
Ticket Machine - Almex Model A

This machine was required for longer routes. The available fares extended to £9.99. This was always a decimal machine, originating in Sweden. From 1971 it was used on Green Line services in the Greater London area, superceding the Setright models which were relegated to one man operated bus services.

The Almex A uses a plain paper roll to print tickets and automatically cuts the ticket. The fare stage boarded is set by turning a small red wheel on the side of the machine. The ticket type is selected by sliding the red band to the desired position. Two green bands select the price in pence while the yellow one selects the pounds. This machine has two extra green bands to select the fare stage for alighting. The second band, at the far left, is static with a lever which moves up and down.

To the left of this is a paper level indicator, to warn of the need to change the roll. There is a slot in which prepaid tickets can be cancelled. The sliding bands can be reset by pulling back on the lever. A detent button on the right side prevents accidental ticket issue but this can be overridden by a large slotted screw below the button. There is a door on the left for replacing ticket rolls and setting the date.

This machine type was introduced on London Country Green Line routes in 1971.

The Almex A was very popular with provincial operators. It features an audit roll that records in brief every ticket issued. This was used for ticket sales analysis as well as checking driver/conductor honesty.

Inside the workings, the paper waits in the printing position for the ticket issue. The printing is done by an impact of moveable type through an inked ribbon. The ticket is then fed out of the machine before being sliced by a rotating guillotine.

Photographic Details

Taken at 2143hrs on 7th February, 2014 with an Olympus E-10 digital SLR camera, post processed with Adobe Photoshop.

©2014 Tim Pickford-Jones.

Comments
fragglerocks
fragglerocks
looks well old! Nice shot.
4 years ago.
HairyHippy
HairyHippy
Thanks for your kind comment, Fraggles.
4 years ago.
HairyHippy
HairyHippy
Thanks for your kind comment, Linuxica ;-)
4 years ago.