HaarFager

HaarFager

Posted on 06/08/2014


Photo taken on June  8, 2014


See also...

# Everyone's Photo Pool # # Everyone's Photo Pool #


50 plus photographers 50 plus photographers


Film is not dead Film is not dead


I Shoot Film I Shoot Film


New Flickr Survivors New Flickr Survivors


Diana Diana


Film Photography Film Photography


B & W B & W


Black and White Black and White


See more...

Keywords

120
Black and White Photography
Diana Clone
Antique Cameras
Old Cameras
Analog Photography
Plastic Cameras
120 Film Cameras
120 Cameras
Diana Cameras
Toy Cameras
Windsor 120 Camera
The Sunday Challenge
TSC
Fuji Neopan 100
B&W
Diana
Black and White
Windsor
100 ISO
120 Film
Classic Cameras
Fuji Film
B&W Photography
Fuji Acros
Fuji Acros Neoplan 100
Explore


Authorizations, license

Visible by: Everyone
All rights reserved

981 visits

Solar Power

Solar Power
This is one of those solar garden lights that draw off sunshine during the day and then turn on to glow at night. Of course, they're not this bright, but a long exposure like this when it's dark outside will make them look much stronger than they really are. It's positioned right at the bottom of the front steps to my house.

For The Sunday Challenge group, who's theme this week was to use a setting on your camera you hadn't used before. I chose the "B" (bulb) setting, which I had never used before, on an old Diana-clone 120 camera. In fact, I'd only ever run one roll of film through the camera and had been meaning to use it again for some time.

For those that don't know about the classic "Diana" camera - they were really really cheap plastic cameras made in Hong Kong in the 1960's and given away as prizes or sold for about .50 cents. That's right - they are super cheap and if you drop one, they might break into a thousand pieces because the plastic is so thin. As a matter of fact, I think mine melted a little on the front because it was kept in a hot car. If you look at mine in the picture below, the melted spot is just above the lens and under the viewfinder.

Camera: Windsor (Diana-clone)
Film: Fuji Film Neopan Acros 100 ISO 120 film
Aperture: F/11
Shutter Speed: "B" (bulb) 10 minute exposure
Focus Range: 4 feet to 6 feet
Date: June 6th, 2014, 9.50-10.00 p.m.
Location: Norris City, Illinois, U.S.A.

Developing process, chemicals were at 68 degrees:
Ilford ID11 developer: 9 mins.
Ilford Ilfostop stop bath: 1 min.
Ilford Hypam fixer: 7 mins.
Water wash: 5 mins.
Kodak Photo-Flo 200: 1 min.

Windsor Neopan 13ef

forever is a long time, Indycaver (Norm), Wierd Folkersma, Amazingstoker and 7 other people have particularly liked this photo


28 comments - The latest ones
HaarFager
HaarFager
Be sure to click on the light in the image for more lights!

Here's the camera that took the above shot:

Windsor, Diana Clone
3 years ago. Edited 3 years ago.
Sami Serola has replied to HaarFager
Great camera! =)
3 years ago.
Sami Serola
Sami Serola
10 minutes! =O Yes, I recall doing something similar in the good old film era. Many today's digital camera's does not have option for that, and longest exposures are something like 15 seconds. Good DSLR cameras of course have it, but not the pocket cameras.

EDIT: Oh, and both pictures are cool B-)
3 years ago. Edited 3 years ago.
HaarFager has replied to Sami Serola
Yes, for all they tout the new DSLR's, there are just some things they can't do as well as an old film camera. If I wanted to take an hour-long exposure of a meteor shower, I couldn't do it with my new DSLR - the battery would run dead long before an hour was up. Yet, I did exactly that with a 60-plus year old Kodak Brownie Hawkeye:

Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Flash Perseid Meteor Shower
3 years ago.
Sami Serola has replied to HaarFager
Oh yes, I forgot the battery issue. No such problems with good old analogue cameras!

Even the wireless remote controls are huge drawback! What on earth was wrong with manual cable releases??? =(
3 years ago.
Valfal
Valfal
Wow, cool shot, and thanks for the history lesson!
3 years ago.
Nylonbleu
Nylonbleu
I do not know this setting at all, and it looks so technical that I'm not sure I have even understand what is is about, but, one thing is sure, the result is fantastic, so mysterious and magical, it creates a wonderful atmosphere !
3 years ago.
HaarFager has replied to Nylonbleu
The bulb setting got it's beginnings in old cameras that you had to squeeze a bulb to get the lens aperture to open to expose the film or glass plate. The name stuck and cameras that have a bulb or "B" setting simply mean that as long as you hold the shutter down, it will keep exposing the film. It helps to have the camera securely mounted on a tripod when you use the bulb setting.

What I did was to place black tape over the lens, then tape the shutter release lever down in the open position. I could then remove the tape from in front of the lens and let the camera take the picture all by itself. I went in the house and did stuff, until about ten minutes had passed, and when the exposure hit 10 minutes exactly, I covered the lens again with the black tape and untaped the shutter release lever so that it would stop taking the photograph. All the while, I had my camera taped securely to a tripod so that it would not move. I simply made sure it was pitch black outside, so the only light showing was my little solar light. That's what lit up my steps, the sidewalk and the plants you see in the image.
3 years ago. Edited 3 years ago.
Sami Serola has replied to HaarFager
Aha! I already wondered what kind of shutter mechanism there is on Windsor because I could not see any release button on top of the camera.

And thanks for the explanation on "bulb". I didn't know it and never checked, although I have wonderful old dictionary of photography in my bookshelf.
3 years ago.
fragglerocks
fragglerocks
Nice work Viking, very film noir.
3 years ago.
Penny
Penny
Great work :)
3 years ago.
*starless*
*starless*
I use Bulb quite a lot for long exposures using a big stopper. Cool camera! Not sure what DSLRs others are using, but mine will stand for longer than an hour on a single battery, but not sure what is max. it will also take a cable release! :-)
3 years ago.
Goffy
Goffy
A mysterious, slightly eerie edge to this shot with the dark shadows. I admire your industry in achieving the result that you wanted. Love the modern art light twirls in notes too! :-)
3 years ago.
Clickity Click
Clickity Click
Oh the first thing that came to mind when I saw this was the scene in Raiders of The Lost Ark where Indiana Jones uses the light from the opening above him to help locate the Ark. Of course this is much darker and dramatic. I had to look several times to see it as a solar light ... I kept thinking of it as light shining down deep into the earth. ( I know I have a vivid imagination ... lol )

I do like what you have created Kenny!
3 years ago.
Shuttering Yukon
Shuttering Yukon
ha, that's actually really cool.... I love the dark and mysterious look... and the light painting is very cool too.
3 years ago.
Michelle Ress
Michelle Ress
That's classy. I'll have to use my Vistaquest VQ 1005 sometime
3 years ago.
HaarFager has replied to Michelle Ress
By all means, do! I have a couple digital keychain cameras that I love to take out and shoot with. One of my favorites is my little $5 .1 megapixel Shift 3 mini digital camera:

Shift 3 Mini Digital Camera
3 years ago.
k.e.s_kloset
k.e.s_kloset
This is really cool Kenny and thanks for all the info on the Diana camera and even a picture of her. She's a beaut! :)

I love your photo and it does have the feel of the old b &w movies for me. I had no idea you could use such a long exposure.
3 years ago.
HaarFager has replied to k.e.s_kloset
Thanks, Karen! The long exposure only worked in this case because it was pitch black and the solar light actually puts off very little light as compared to a regular light. I was worried that 10 minutes might not be long enough for 100 ISO film, relatively slow for night photography!
3 years ago. Edited 2 years ago.
Yvette Chew
Yvette Chew
Great work.
3 years ago.
H C
H C
Very interesting work I like all your descriptions of how you did this.
3 years ago.
autofantasia
autofantasia
Looks great and I enjoyed the narrative too! :)
3 years ago.
Amazingstoker
Amazingstoker
great, really nice semi-abstract, it's got a slightly eerie feel to it . . .
3 years ago.
charlie b
charlie b
Sometimes simple gets the job done better than complex. K.I.S.S. (keep it simple stupid)
3 years ago.
HaarFager has replied to charlie b
Charlie - I'm a firm believer in K.I.S.S.!
3 years ago.
Wierd Folkersma
Wierd Folkersma
I love to read about how you made your picture, it reminds of old times.
Excellent light.
3 years ago.
Gillian Everett
Gillian Everett
Sounds very complicated, a blast from the past :-)
3 years ago.
Indycaver (Norm)
Indycaver (Norm)
Great composition and photo Kenny!
3 years ago.