IT WAS A BOOJUM

Tudors



Ditchley Snark

The comparison shows Henry Holiday's illustration (1876) to the front cover of Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark compared to a reproduction of the Ditchley Portrait (a gift from Sir Henry Lee to Queen Elizabeth I, c. 1592) by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger. 2013-02-05: The allusions in Henry Holiday's Snark illustration to the Ditchley Portrait are not as easy to detect as in some other Snark illustrations by Holiday, yet this comparison holds the third rank in my set of Flickr Members' Snark Favorites . Watch the sail of the ship and the queen's "sail". "While I concede Tufail 's thesis (2003) that Holiday received his instructions from Carroll and created his illustrations to reflect Carroll's cryptic messages and allusions, I contend that the interpretations given to the words we know so well by so many illustrators over a period in excess of 130 years continue to keep the Snark alive. Furthermore, it is my personal belief that Holiday managed to slip in a few interpretations of his own even though Carroll approved of the end result." (Doug Howick: The Hiihijig of the Bijtcheb, Knight Letter #28, Summer 2009) Perhaps Tufail and Howick both are right. As Henry Holiday frequently alluded to works of father&son Gheeraerts, John Tufail's Illuminated Snark (2004) gave me the idea to search for a Gheeraerts painting in which a map is shown . John reckoned, that the clouds in Holiday's front cover illustration may be part of a map. I think that this possibility cannot be excluded. John's assumption then drew my attention to the Ditchley portrait. (The Ditchley portrait again helped me to find sources for Holiday's illustration to the back cover of Carroll's book as well.)

Ditchley Snark

The image shows Henry Holiday's illustration (1876) to the front cover of Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark compared to a grey shaded reproduction of the Ditchley Portrait (a gift from Sir Henry Lee to Queen Elizabeth I, c. 1592) by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger. "While I concede Tufail 's thesis (2003) that Holiday received his instructions from Carroll and created his illustrations to reflect Carroll's cryptic messages and allusions, I contend that the interpretations given to the words we know so well by so many illustrators over a period in excess of 130 years continue to keep the Snark alive. Furthermore, it is my personal belief that Holiday managed to slip in a few interpretations of his own even though Carroll approved of the end result." (Doug Howick: The Hiihijig of the Bijtcheb, Knight Letter #28, Summer 2009) Perhaps Tufail and Howick both are right. There is more: "The 'clouds' - or what at first glance appear to be clouds, are another item of considerable interest. If these are indeed supposed to represent clouds, then they are remarkably poor renditions (and Holiday was by no means either a poor, nor slipshod artist). Rather any close examination of this aspect of the illustration leads the observer to think that this background to the Bellman is actually a map, complete with rivers. contrast to the map Bellman presents to his admiring crew." (John Tufail, The Illuminated Snark , 2004) As Henry Holiday in his Snark illustrations frequently alluded to works of father&son Gheeraerts, John Tufail's Illuminated Snark gave me the idea to search for a Gheeraerts painting in which a map is shown . John reckoned, that the clouds in Holiday's front cover illustration may be part of a map. I think that this possibility cannot be excluded. John's assumption then drew my attention to the Ditchley portrait. (The Ditchley portrait again helped me to find sources for Holiday's illustration to the back cover of Carroll's book as well.) 2013-12: Evidence supporting of John Tufail's thesis: www.doylenewyork.com/asp/fullcatalogue.asp?salelot=13BP04+++553+&refno=++953647&image=0 (see also: groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/carrolliana/conversations/topics/358 )

IT WAS A BOOJUM

[left]: Henry Holiday's back cover illustration (1876) to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark . [right]: Allegorical English School painting (ca. 1610, redrawn and rearranged: 2013) of Queen Elizabeth I at Old Age with allegory of Death and Father Time . (Location of original painting: Corsham Court, EAN-Number: 4050356835081) www.corsham-court.co.uk/Pictures/Commentary.html : "This portrait of Elizabeth I illustrates the difficulties she encountered during her troubled reign. For example, conflict between Protestants and Catholics was rife and the re-drafting of the Book of Common Prayer (held in her left hand) was a sensitive issue of the time." Changes of lower segment: Shifted mirror view

IT WAS A BOOJUM (bw)

[left]: Henry Holiday's back cover illustration (1876) to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark . [right]: Allegorical English School painting (ca. 1610, redrawn, color desaturated and rearranged 2013) of Queen Elizabeth I at Old Age with allegory of Death and Father Time . (Location of original painting: Corsham Court, EAN-Number: 4050356835081) www.corsham-court.co.uk/Pictures/Commentary.html : "This portrait of Elizabeth I illustrates the difficulties she encountered during her troubled reign. For example, conflict between Protestants and Catholics was rife and the re-drafting of the Book of Common Prayer (held in her left hand) was a sensitive issue of the time." Changes of lower segment: Shifted mirror view [inset]: The Bellman , detail from Henry Holiday's front cover illustration (1876) to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark .

Holiday - Millais - Anonymous - Galle

See also: www.academia.edu/9856486/Henry_Holiday_-_and_Millais_Christ_in_the_House_of_His_Parents_ . The discovery here is the allusion by Henry Holiday to the painting by J.E. Millais. Finding Millais' allusions to an anonymous painter and to Galle's print is a "bycatch" of my Snark hunt. The relation between the anonymous painting and Galle's print already has been explained by Margaret Aston in 1994. That relation brobably has been discovered even earlier by Millais. . [left]: Henry Holiday: Depiction (1876) of the Baker 's visit to his uncle in Lewis Carroll's " The Hunting of the Snark " (engraved by Joseph Swain). Outside of the window are some of the Baker's 42 boxes. [right top]: John Everett Millais : Christ in the House of His Parents aka The Carpenter's Shop (1850). Location: Tate Britain (N03584) , London. Literature: * Deborah Mary Kerr (1986): John Everett Millais's Christ in the house of his parents ( circle.ubc.ca/handle/2429/26546 ) p.34 in (01) Éva Péteri (2003): Victorian Approaches to Religion as Reflected in the Art of the Pre-Raphaelites, Budapest 2003, ISBN 978-9630580380 (shortlink: www.snrk.de/EvaPeteri.htm ) * Albert Boime (2008): Art in an Age of Civil Struggle, 1848-1871 p. 225-364: The Pre-Raphaelites and the 1848 Revolution ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:BookSources/0226063283 ) [right middle]: Anonymous : Edward VI and the Pope , An Allegory of Reformation, mirrored view (16th century, NPG 4165 ). Iconoclasm depicted in the window. Under the "window" 3rd from left is Thomas Cranmer who wrote the 42 Articles in 1552. Edward VI and the Pope (NPG 4165) was, until 1874, the property of Thomas Green, Esq., of Ipswich and Upper Wimpole Street , a collection 'Formed by himself and his Family during the last Century and early Part of the present Century' (Roy C. Strong: Tudor and Jacobean Portraits , 1969, p.345). Thus, when Millais' Christ in the House of His Parents ('The Carpenter's Shop') was painted in 1849-1850, the 16th century painting was part of a private collection. It was sold by Christie's 20 March 1874 (lot 9) to a buyer unknown to me, that is, when Holiday started with his illustrations to The Hunting of the Snark . Location: National Portrait Gallery, London [right bottom]: Philip Galle after Maarten van Heemskerck , Redrawn print Ahasuerus consulting the records (1564). The resemblance to the image above (right middle) was shown by Dr. Margaret Aston in 1994 in The King's Bedpost: Reformation and Iconography in a Tudor Group Portrait (p. 68). She also compared the bedpost to Heemskerck's Esther Crowned by Ahasuerus . Location: Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

The Hunting Of The Snark

The Hunting of the Snark (1876) has been written by Lewis Carroll and illustrated by Henry Holiday. The Image shows Henry Holiday's illustrations to the front cover and the back cover of the book and paintings depicting Queen Elizabeth I. There are many more pictorial allusions in Henry Holiday's Snark illustrations.

The Hunting of the Snark

The Hunting of the Snark (1876) has been written by Lewis Carroll and illustrated by Henry Holiday. The Image shows Henry Holiday's illustrations to the front cover and the back cover of the book and paintings depicting Queen Elizabeth I, to which Henry Holyday may have alluded. There are many more pictorial allusions in Henry Holiday's Snark illustrations.

Queen Elizabeth I at old age

Allegorical English School painting (ca. 1610, redrawn in 2013) of Queen Elizabeth I at Old Age with allegory of Death and Father Time . (Location of original painting: Corsham Court, EAN-Number: 4050356835081) www.corsham-court.co.uk/Pictures/Commentary.html : "This portrait of Elizabeth I illustrates the difficulties she encountered during her troubled reign. For example, conflict between Protestants and Catholics was rife and the re-drafting of the Book of Common Prayer (held in her left hand) was a sensitive issue of the time." More: www.ipernity.com/doc/goetzkluge/21942343/in/album/417373

The Bellman and Sir Henry Lee

The Bellman (segment of an illustration by Henry Holliday to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark ) and a mirrored view of an unfinished portrait of Sir Henry Lee by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger Yes, the noses and the eyes are different. This is not a face comparison. In this case, Holiday's pictorial allusions refer to the surroundings of Lee's face, not to the face itself. As in several other cases, Holiday maintained the topological relation between the quoted shapes. Here the shapes are the nodes in two quite similar graphs. Holiday even "copied" the cracks in the varnish of Gheerert's painting.