Ditchley Snark

The comparison shows Henry Holiday's illustration (1876) to the front cover of Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark compared to a reproduction of the Ditchley Portrait (a gift from Sir Henry Lee to Queen Elizabeth I, c. 1592) by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger. 2013-02-05: The allusions in Henry Holiday's Snark illustration to the Ditchley Portrait are not as easy to detect as in some other Snark illustrations by Holiday, yet this comparison holds the third rank in my set of Flickr Members' Snark Favorit…

Ditchley Snark

The image shows Henry Holiday's illustration (1876) to the front cover of Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark compared to a grey shaded reproduction of the Ditchley Portrait (a gift from Sir Henry Lee to Queen Elizabeth I, c. 1592) by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger. "While I concede Tufail 's thesis (2003) that Holiday received his instructions from Carroll and created his illustrations to reflect Carroll's cryptic messages and allusions, I contend that the interpretations given to the words we k…

IT WAS A BOOJUM

[left]: Henry Holiday's back cover illustration (1876) to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark. [right]: Allegorical English School painting (ca. 1610, redrawn and rearranged: 2013) of Queen Elizabeth I at Old Age with allegory of Death and Father Time. (Location of original painting: Corsham Court, EAN-Number: 4050356835081) www.corsham-court.co.uk/Pictures/Commentary.html: "This portrait of Elizabeth I illustrates the difficulties she encountered during her troubled reign. For example, conflict betwe…

IT WAS A BOOJUM (bw)

[left]: Henry Holiday's back cover illustration (1876) to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark. [right]: Allegorical English School painting (ca. 1610, redrawn, color desaturated and rearranged 2013) of Queen Elizabeth I at Old Age with allegory of Death and Father Time. (Location of original painting: Corsham Court, EAN-Number: 4050356835081) www.corsham-court.co.uk/Pictures/Commentary.html: "This portrait of Elizabeth I illustrates the difficulties she encountered during her troubled reign. For examp…

Holiday - Millais - Anonymous - Galle

See also: www.academia.edu/9856486/Henry_Holiday_-_and_Millais_Christ_in_the_House_of_His_ Parents_ . The discovery here is the allusion by Henry Holiday to the painting by J.E. Millais. Finding Millais' allusions to an anonymous painter and to Galle's print is a "bycatch" of my Snark hunt. The relation between the anonymous painting and Galle's print already has been explained by Margaret Aston in 1994. That relation brobably has been discovered even earlier by Millais. . [left]: Henry Holiday: Depicti…

The Hunting Of The Snark

The Hunting of the Snark (1876) has been written by Lewis Carroll and illustrated by Henry Holiday. The Image shows Henry Holiday's illustrations to the front cover and the back cover of the book and paintings depicting Queen Elizabeth I. There are many more pictorial allusions in Henry Holiday's Snark illustrations.

The Hunting of the Snark

The Hunting of the Snark (1876) has been written by Lewis Carroll and illustrated by Henry Holiday. The Image shows Henry Holiday's illustrations to the front cover and the back cover of the book and paintings depicting Queen Elizabeth I, to which Henry Holyday may have alluded. There are many more pictorial allusions in Henry Holiday's Snark illustrations.

Queen Elizabeth I at old age

Allegorical English School painting (ca. 1610, redrawn in 2013) of Queen Elizabeth I at Old Age with allegory of Death and Father Time. (Location of original painting: Corsham Court, EAN-Number: 4050356835081) www.corsham-court.co.uk/Pictures/Commentary.html: "This portrait of Elizabeth I illustrates the difficulties she encountered during her troubled reign. For example, conflict between Protestants and Catholics was rife and the re-drafting of the Book of Common Prayer (held in her left hand) was a sensit…

The Bellman and Sir Henry Lee

The Bellman (segment of an illustration by Henry Holliday to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark) and a mirrored view of an unfinished portrait of Sir Henry Lee by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger Yes, the noses and the eyes are different. This is not a face comparison. In this case, Holiday's pictorial allusions refer to the surroundings of Lee's face, not to the face itself. As in several other cases, Holiday maintained the topological relation between the quoted shapes. Here the shapes are the nodes i…