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Assemblage Assemblage


Lewis Carroll Lewis Carroll


Henry Holiday Henry Holiday


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Keywords

Snark after May 2013
paranoiac-critical method
juvenile books
zoomorphism
John Martin
The Bard
Henry Holiday
The Hunting of the Snark
Allusionsforschung
allusion research
crossover
crossover books


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Monster Nose

Monster Nose
Color image:
John Martin: lower segment of The Bard, now in the Yale Center for British Art

Large black&white inlay:
[left]: John Martin: Detail from The Bard (ca. 1817)
[right, mirror view]: Henry Holiday: From Illustration (1876) to chapter The Beaver's Lesson in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark

6 comments - The latest ones
 Götz Kluge
Götz Kluge club
The image above is a new version of the image below. No big change. But in the new comparison it is easier (than in the old one shown below) to relate the enlarged "tree monster" to the place where it came from:
Monster Face

Color image:
John Martin: lower segment of The Bard, now in the Yale Center for British Art

Large black&white inlay:
[left]: Henry Holiday: From Illustration (1876) to chapter The Beaver's Lesson in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark
[right, mirror view]: John Martin: Detail from The Bard (ca. 1817)
6 years ago. Edited 6 years ago.
 Götz Kluge
Götz Kluge club
6 years ago.
 Götz Kluge
Götz Kluge club
Monster Feet
6 years ago.
 Nylonbleu
Nylonbleu
always fabulous to discover your posts !
6 years ago.
 Götz Kluge
Götz Kluge club
Thank you. Interestingly, some Carroll-fans ("Carrollians") seem to be afraid of my comparisons. Some got angry and thought that I would accuse Henry Holiday (Carroll's illustrator for the Snark) of plagiarism. But Holiday didn't "steal". Artists and non-carrollian art lovers probably are much opener in dealing with what Holiday did. He constructed pictorial conundrums which match perfectly with Carroll's textual conundrums.

Also, this is a quite "English" thing. We are talking about The Hunting of the Snark! Strange, that the English leave the digging into this to a German :-)

Nylonbleu, you are French. You may be interested in how Holiday alluded to Gustave Doré.

From Doré's Root to Holiday's Rat
Doré - Holiday

Doré (1863), Holiday (1876), Doré (1866)
Doré - Holiday - Doré

Yes, In the image above, Doré "alluded" to Doré. (This is like "re-use" in software design, an absolutely legitimate process.) And Henry Holiday probably alluded to "both" of them ;-)
6 years ago. Edited 6 years ago.
 Götz Kluge
Götz Kluge club
Yet annother version of the monster assemblage:
The Monster in the Branches
6 years ago. Edited 6 years ago.

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