Götz Kluge

Götz Kluge

Posted on 07/28/2013


Photo taken on December 12, 2010


See also...

Amateur Radio Amateur Radio



Keywords

morse code
DL5MDA
Elbug


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El Bug, 1972

El Bug, 1972
Electronic morse keyer

It's a squeeze key built in the year 1972 using CMOS logic.

Controls (front side, from left to right)
- Power: ON/OFF
- Output inversion: ON/OFF
- Monitor: ON/OFF, volume
- Speed: 6 to 40 WpM
- Dot buffer: ON/OFF
- Squeeze paddles

Driver stage: Selectable power transistors usable as low-side switch

Connectors (rear side):
- Driver to transmitter (PNP collector&emitter, NPN collector&emitter, CMOS out, ground)
- Optional external squeeze paddle

Batteries: 9V for logic, 1.5V for monitor

See also: commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Elbug.jpg

DL5MDA

SV1XV, forever is a long time have particularly liked this photo


Comments
Götz Kluge
Götz Kluge
4 years ago. Edited 4 years ago.
KJ4VOV
KJ4VOV
Interesting... Can you tell a little about it please?
4 years ago.
Götz Kluge
Götz Kluge
Of course. I added a little description (controls, driver, batteries, connectors) to the caption text.
Today I would use a cheap microcontroller instead of those CMOS chips (timer, gates, flipflops). The driver can drive an old high voltage key input of a transmitter supporting various ways to drive a key input. Today I would be a bit more cautious due to safety reasons. But for modern gear that's not an issue anyway. - I built that device in 1976 when I was a micromechanics student.
4 years ago. Edited 4 years ago.
Henry L ( k4eyv )
Henry L ( k4eyv )
This is really a cool return to the " old days." Dit Dit de k5icw
4 years ago.
Götz Kluge
Götz Kluge
Elbug
3 years ago.