Götz Kluge

Götz Kluge

Posted on 05/30/2013


Photo taken on January  7, 2013


See also...

Occupational Health & Safety Occupational Health & Safety


Gustave Doré Gustave Doré


Antique Books and Engravings Antique Books and Engravings


The Hunting of the Snark The Hunting of the Snark


Henry Holiday Henry Holiday


Art is Art Art is Art


At work At work


books books


diptych diptych


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Keywords

arts research
John Milton
English literature
Kunstwissenschaft
visuelle Semiotik
visual semiotics
pictorial quote
pictorial citation
interpictorial
Cryptomorphism
Bildervergleich
image comparison
pictorial allusions
Gustave Doré
Joseph Swain
comparison
Paradise Lost
pictorial
Lewis Carroll
allusions
Miguel de Cervantes
Don Quixote
Bildzitat
The Hunting of the Snark
Henry Holiday
Snark
juvenile books
Allusionsforschung
allusion research
crossover
crossover books
re-use


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Doré (1863), Holiday (1876), Doré (1866)

Doré (1863), Holiday (1876), Doré (1866)
=== Henry Holiday's Allusions ===
The comparison shows illustrations [right side] by Gustave Doré (to John Milton's Paradise Lost, Book VI, 1866), [left side] Plate I of Gustave Doré's illustrations to chapter 1 in Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quixote (1863 edition) and [center] by Henry Holiday (to The Hunting of the Snark, 1876).
Probably also this applies: Doré (1863) -> Doré (1866). Why shouldn't a prolific artist re-use his own work?

See also: www.academia.edu/9920080/Henry_Holiday_and_Gustave_Dor%C3%A9_borrowing_from_Gustave_Dor%C3%A9

=== Safety at the Workplace ===
The story how I run into The Hunting of the Snark" is has been moved to this image:
www.ipernity.com/doc/goetzkluge/34431511

Light Scholar, Davanyta, forever is a long time have particularly liked this photo


Comments
Götz Kluge
Götz Kluge
6 Sources to the Beaver's Lesson
3 years ago. Edited 3 years ago.
Götz Kluge
Götz Kluge
They also are allusions to the illustrations by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger and to other artists. Henry Holiday built them into this illustration (center image,1876) to Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark. His pictorial allusions parallel run parallel to Carroll's textual allusions.

This also is an special finding, as it shows that Doré used the composition of an 1863 illustration (left image) for an 1866 illustration (right image). As he produced lots of illustrations, "copying" from his own work probably almost was a necessity. Artists know how artists work, therefore Henry Holiday may have understood Doré's "self allusion" already many years before I run into this as an outsider. Artists perhaps don't talk about how their colleagues work. But I am not an artist :-)
3 years ago. Edited 15 months ago.