Ellis Nadler

Ellis Nadler

Posted on 07/30/2014


Photo taken on July 30, 2014


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*Italo-Byzantine Audacity *Italo-Byzantine Audacity


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Republika Ploska 17 zlotnik.

Republika Ploska 17 zlotnik.
watercolour 145 x 95 mm.

Mike Roberts, Jerry Waese, Götz Kluge and 2 other people have particularly liked this photo


Comments
Steve Bucknell
Steve Bucknell
Yaqut al-Musta’simi was born to parents of Algerian origin who fled to Ploska in 1900. Little is known of his early life and education. He attended the small Mismir madrasa in Lubska, and, like his 13th century namesake, was a skilled copyist of the noble Qu’ran. He rose to be chief imam of Lubska’s large masjid. When the Nazis invaded Ploska , he met Zeich, the German Governor General, and assured him of Muslim support for the occupying powers . Al-Musta’simi then proceeded systematically to use his position in the masjid to protect the local Jewish population. Jews were sheltered in the sanctuary of the mosque and false identity papers were supplied to Jews who wished to leave Ploska. It is alleged that al-Musta’simi also collaborated to enlist Muslim men to serve in SS volunteer divisions, but his Jewish supporters believe that this was an inevitable part of him keeping his untouchable status with the Nazi powers. After the war al-Musta’simi almost never left the masjid and was said to have studied Sufism with increasing intensity. One pupil described him as attempting to purify his inner self from the filth that the war had stained it with. It is also said that he became reclusive and eccentric. When the government of Ploska tried to honour him with the 17 zlotnik stamp he organised his followers to seize and destroy all the stamps they could find. This accounts for its rarity today. In mysterious circumstances, in 1987, al-Musta’simi disappeared from Ploska. His followers report the Paul Simon song “You Can Call Me Al” was heard playing constantly from his study-room. His ultimate fate is still a matter of speculation.
3 years ago. Edited 3 years ago.
Ellis Nadler has replied to Steve Bucknell
Thanks for this helpful insight. Your time in the Stadtsekuritate di Ploska Arkiv was not wasted.
3 years ago.
Jerry Waese
Jerry Waese
cool
3 years ago.