Eike

Eike

Posted on 01/28/2008


Photo taken on January 28, 2008



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Germany
Aachen
Panorama


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Ruin

Ruin
One more panorama. Buying extreme wide angle lenses has become unnecessary, as long as the subject doesn't move.

David Sn has particularly liked this photo


8 comments - The latest ones
KliX
KliX
in a way you are right about ultra-wife angles and the possibilities offered by the panorama programs. Only, I often have problems with stitching the parts of pictures together as the deviation are sometime too big and the program cannot correct them 100%. Segments would then overlap that are not 100% fitting. Still I often use such a software as you are doing ;-)
9 years ago.
Eike has replied to KliX
Yes, I have the same problem too, one would really need a panorama head and a tripod. Next time I'll try to erase the not-matching parts from all of the images, except for one. I'll see how much time it will take.
And then there is the problem of covering the whole area of the panorama! Also in this image I had to paint a little bit of the sky. I really think your hotel panorama is a very elegant way to circumvent this problem. Another nice way is this solution.
9 years ago. Edited 9 years ago.
KliX
KliX
from one side why not working on it manually if it is fun and you enjoy it? It becomes then an individual peace of art. On the other side it is really exhausting to do these things you mentioned.
I think, that at certain focal lengths and distances you won't have this problem. If you look at the tag "pano" you see various pictures (no all of them) did not have the problem. Why? I do not know. maybe I have to analyse the focal lengths, distances and angles

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9 years ago.
Eike has replied to KliX
Well, I hate that making panoramas is so time consuming; especially those manual steps. However it is powerfull, and you can take many decisions calmly at home.

The objects with the stitching errors are always in the foreground! To get rid of the errors the camera needs to be turned around a special (so called nodal or no-parallax) point, which is usually close to the front lens. Otherwise the perspective changes slightly between individual photos. The panorama head is a (big) metal construction, that rotates the camera around the front lens.
Here's a nice explanation:
www.path.unimelb.edu.au/~bernardk/tutorials/360/photo/nodal.html
This page shows how a simple panoramic head might look like:
www.panoramafactory.com/camera_setup/setup.html

In case I tell you things that you already know: sorry!
9 years ago.
KliX has replied to Eike
Thank you for the explanations. I heard about the nodal point 2 weeks ago and I did not look it up further. All my panoramas have been produced with my camera hand held and decision taken spontaneously. Perhaps it is good for me to understand the theory better in case I want once to make
sure that I make a 100% correct image with tripod etc. In most cases as I am doing all hand held (in my travels around the world) the rotation comes from the rotation of the upper side of my body while my feet are standing steady. So, possible at certain focal lengths teh nodal point is closer to the camera body and tp my body rotation. In others focal lengths the point is further from that and that is why I had a strong distrortion.
9 years ago.
Eike has replied to KliX
Yes same with me, I want to take pictures spontaneously. Therefore I only carry my camera and a bean bag. I put my camera on some object (car, fence, wall) to be able to control the movements better.
You with your SLR could hold the camera at the objective close to the front lens, and rest your elbow on some object. Turning the camera with your hand would be fairly similar to the movement of a panorama head.
Yesterday night I read of the following method: Look a the floor, and remember a spot between your toes. If you need to turn, turn around this spot.
For covering the whole area I'll probably have to always remind me: "Don't forget the sky!"
9 years ago.
Jerry Lee
Jerry Lee
very interesting discussion
9 years ago.