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Me, Air Force uniform

Me, Air Force uniform
In Air Force uniform, apparently taken in my mother's home. Since the insignia is one chevron, for Airman, that means I was an E-2. The picture thus was probably taken in July, 1967, as I was preparing to go from basic training to Monterey for language school.

Best when viewed as part of Jacksonville childhood album.

9 comments - The latest ones
James Ruddy
James Ruddy
Yep, a mosquito wing and national defense service ribbon. I always did like the khaki uniform, but they phased it out years ago. I think they were called, 1505's?
3 years ago.
Don Barrett (aka DBs… has replied to James Ruddy
I don't remember, but did a quick search and it looks like they were called 505's. Main thing I remember about them is that they were the required daily wear when I was stationed in Monterey, which wasn't healthy. While they may have been correct for the rest of California, the Presidio at Monterey is right on the Pacific and has long periods of being foggy and cold.
3 years ago.
James Ruddy
James Ruddy
I did a more thorough search and they were indeed 1505's, I then remembered why that stuck to me...that's my "last four." Then it came back, we called them "fifteen oh fives."

They aren't appropriate for all weather conditions, that's for sure. I remember having to wear them when I reported for my new duty assignment, in the winter, at Duluth IAP, MN because they lost all my baggage somewhere between the P.I. and Yakota, and it was all I had to wear. It didn't take me long to lose my temper at about the 10th or so person that had to go out of their way to tell me that wasn't an authorized winter uniform for wear at this base! I was freezing and really pissed because that's all I had and didn't have any money to buy the proper uniforms to replace the ones the AF lost. I created a scene when I'd had enough, telling whoever it was, that if they wanted me to put on the proper uniform why don't they jump their sorry ass into the Pacific Ocean and take a goddamn swim to find my fucking uniforms and bring them back so I can fuckin change, it that would make them happy...something like that. Anyway, I got reported and my 1st Shirt got me a clothing voucher to help tide me over, and a letter of reprimand for disrespect to someone higher in rank. It only took them six months to find my stuff and get it back to me. Wow! It still pisses me off, and I still feel good about telling someone off :)
3 years ago.
Don Barrett (aka DBs… has replied to James Ruddy
That (that you can't raise your voice at someone higher up but dumber), was one of the reasons I got out -- but of course, ran into that throughout my working career. We always 'got back' through other means. We had a new lieutenant in Turkey who wanted to do barracks checks (we were all E4 or above), but he quickly learned that was out of the question when suddenly there was just too much static to listen to the flights over the southern USSR.
3 years ago.
James Ruddy
James Ruddy
Hahahaaaa...I remember it well. I think I've already told you how it took me a while to grow up, and my first two 4 years were ones where all I did was be defiant, oppositional, and a general pain in the ass. I didn't really care if they kicked me out or not, at that time, and created as much trouble as I could get away with. It was only after getting married that I had to learn how to be more passively aggressive with my so called superiors, and became quite well at that method of dealing with dumbasses higher in rank. At the missile sites, my favorite was to disconnect their TV cable, and not be able to find the problem or fix it for them...that made their 24 hour tour in the capsule very boring. And if I really didn't like them I'd disconnect a pneumatic line in the environmental system that caused their emergency air conditioning unit to start up, and it was super loud and annoying. They "knew" I did it, but couldn't prove it, and sometimes when they showed up for their tour one of the Lt's would seek me out and beg me not to do it cause it wasn't his fault he was assigned with an asshole for his partner. Lt., later Capt. Chuck Norris (not the karate guy) was the worst of them all. A former enlisted guy who became an officer and loved to let everyone know how he was once enlisted, but decided to "BETTER" himself and become an officer. We'd have to sit in the truck for the 70 mile drive to our site every three days and listen to him talking himself up...and putting us down in the process. He got special treatment, and every once in a while I'd get called in to visit with the Commander, who fortunately, didn't like the guy either. I almost felt sorry for the guy, and one time he pulled me aside to confide in me! He wanted to know why nobody seemed to like him...the enlisted didn't because, in his mind, were jealous that he became something better, but he wondered why his fellow officers didn't seem to like him either, why they begged not to be assigned to his team, why they'ed groan when the team list were read and they got him...etc., but all I could think of to say was, "Cause you're an asshole, sir," and just walked off leaving him standing there. I could do better now, but at the time I didn't really care.

In many ways, I really miss those days.
3 years ago.
Don Barrett (aka DBs… has replied to James Ruddy
The whole "sabotage" routine is so common in such strictly hierarchical organizations (including industry), that you have to wonder sometimes how anything actually works.
3 years ago.
James Ruddy
James Ruddy
I think it's another case of human nature. Nobody likes the feeling of absolute powerlessness in life, and the more they become oppressed, they more they will find ways to recover what the other has taken from them. This need to feel empowered and act on it is counter productive but seems to be hardwired into the human psyche. People are cooperative with the proper motivations, but under a toxic leader, a micromanager, a strict disciplinarian, a sadist, a psychopathic personality type, they always revolt against them and the organization with whatever means they have, or can devise. It brings out the very worst in people. And many will spend their entire lives under these conditions, all the while seeking advancement, so they in their own turn can inflict the same onto those below them. This is very common in corporate organizations...which is why I quit my last job.
3 years ago.
Don Barrett (aka DBs travels)
Don Barrett (aka DBs…
Probably why all of my family has a history of self-employment...
3 years ago.
James Ruddy
James Ruddy
That's one way to do it. I always stuck to being in very small groups, or out in the field somewhere, and never had an office to speak of like many others. I would always seek out conditions where I had the most freedom and independence for myself that I could manage. I suppose the word independence has various meanings, but to me it means, being left alone.
3 years ago.