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Keywords

église
Massif central
Moyen Âge
Dominique Robert
An 1000
Year 1000
An mil
sarcophagi
D810
24mm f/1.4
sarcophages
early Medieval
proto-médiéval
Romanesque
Auvergne
cimetière
church
romane
cemetery
roman
tombe
tomb
médiéval
France
Nikon
Nikkor
Medieval
Saint Floret


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Hillside cemetery of Saint-Floret

Hillside cemetery of Saint-Floret
The very old cemetery of Saint-Floret in Auvergne, central France (still being used today, in its newer section) is an extremely peaceful and bucolic place, but also an extremely interesting one. Its squat, Romanesque church dates back from the Year 1000 and offers an original layout designed primarily at offering the flock some degree of protection against bad weather, not unknown in these parts, and of course much worse and more frequent in the Middle Ages.

The earliest graves have been dug out haphazardly on the hillside, where there is but precious little dirt. You can even see some early Mediæval graves (more like sacrcophagi, in fact) literally carved out of the basalt, as you will see in one of the pictures. Each family had one, and you can see how small they are —not child-sized, but almost, by today's standards. The dead were “buried” there under what had to be a thin layer of dirt, and when another death happened within the same family, the bones of the previous deceased were pulled out and stashed in the ossuary, to make space for the newcomer... Only in the 12th century did the church impose burying in wood caskets in full ground.

Comments
Doug Wall
Doug Wall
Interesting photo.
19 months ago.