dogmarten28

dogmarten28

Posted on 08/12/2013


Photo taken on July 24, 2013



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Keywords

village
Wakes Colne
Gainsborough Line
Chappel Viaduct
Braintree
Marks Tey
dogmarten28
Sudbury
Colne Valley
East Anglia
Chappel
Essex
viaduct
railway
Stour Valley Railway


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Chappel Viaduct

Chappel Viaduct
A panorama from the car-park of the Swan Inn.

Chappel Viaduct near Wakes Colne in Essex is a Grade 1 European monument. It is 1,066 feet (325 m) long and has 32 arches of 30 feet (9 m) span. The viaduct crosses the Colne Valley at a maximum height of 75 feet (23 m).

According to William White’s History, Gazetteer and Directory of the County of Essex, 1848, the first stone was laid in 14th September 1847. A bottle containing a newly minted sovereign, a half-sovereign, a shilling, a sixpence and a four-penny piece was placed underneath this stone. This bottle and all its contents were stolen shortly after the laying ceremony; the culprit was caught after he tried to pass over a brand new sovereign coin in the nearby Rose and Crown public house.

The viaduct took two years to build. With seven million bricks, it is the second largest brick built structure in England after the Battersea Power Station. Peter Schuyler Bruff, the engineer for the Stour Valley Railway, picked brick rather than the original choice of laminated timber, partly because it was cheaper. The piers were hollow to save money and reduce weight. The large number of construction workers needed for the project were housed, many with their families, in temporary huts built on Wakes Colne Green. Bruff later went on the found the seaside resort of Clacton-on-Sea.

The first passenger train to Sudbury, carrying an official party from Colchester, ran on 2 July 1849. It currently takes the Marks Tey to Sudbury (Gainsborough) branch line, which connects regularly with trains to and from London's Liverpool Street Station.

A further remarkable feature of the viaduct is that it is built on a gradient - the Sudbury end is 9.5 feet (2.9 m) higher than the Marks Tey end.

Lorenzo Kjell Salmonson, Angela Parker, Lorraine ~ Kanga ~, Rambonp and 5 other people have particularly liked this photo


14 comments - The latest ones
Don Sutherland
Don Sutherland
Outstanding capture.
4 years ago.
Tanyaluk Photography
Tanyaluk Photography
Excellent, great pano
4 years ago.
Thomas Smith
Thomas Smith
Beautiful and fascinating place. Very well captured.
4 years ago.
╰☆☆June☆☆╮
╰☆☆June☆☆╮
Great capture, thank you for sharing with us at Historical & Architectural Gems
www.ipernity.com/group/332973
4 years ago.
Juan
Juan
Excellent photo !!
4 years ago.
Juan
Juan
great composition
4 years ago.
Polyrus
Polyrus
Yet another great presentation from you Bruce.
I try to visualise what it would have been like in the days of steam.....and seeing the locos working hard going towards Sudbury.
4 years ago.
Rambonp
Rambonp
Splendid !!! GREAT capture friend ! Have an enjoyable time !
4 years ago.
Janet Ulliott
Janet Ulliott
So Well Taken and Presented
4 years ago.
Lorraine ~ Kanga ~
Lorraine ~ Kanga ~
Beautifully composed image, well taken nice processing.
Thank you for the history (which I love ) it makes a photo so much better. L.
Seen in my contacts.
4 years ago.
Soeradjoen
Soeradjoen
Fantasic picture!
4 years ago.
Rambonp
Rambonp
Splendid !!! Excellent capture friend ! Have a nice time !
4 years ago.
Jaap van 't Veen
Jaap van 't Veen
Excellent picture.
4 years ago.
Costas Kaounas
Costas Kaounas
great structure!!
4 years ago.