brian hefele

brian hefele

Posted on 05/31/2013


Photo taken on January  1, 2013


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exploratory.

exploratory.
national gallery sculpture garden, washington, dc
spring 2013
contax t
kentmere 100 @ 25
1.2cc rodinal / 240cc tank; 1 hr stand 20c

Missi has particularly liked this photo


7 comments - The latest ones
Sixfootzero
Sixfootzero
Nice negative/positive space thing happening here.

Have a roll of Kentmere 100 loaded in the SRT, with the dial set to ISO25 but have yet to take a picture with it. Soon. Soon...
4 years ago.
brian hefele has replied to Sixfootzero
Thanks! I just loaded up another roll in the T, it's becoming my go-to after-work combo now that it's still light outside when I leave the office. I really can't fathom how there are so few low-speed film emulsions these days... Even 25 feels like a stretch sometimes! :)
4 years ago.
Ned
Ned
I like this one too!
4 years ago.
brian hefele has replied to Ned
Thank you!
4 years ago.
Sixfootzero
Sixfootzero
I looked up the T on ebay, and it seems like a handy little camera with what looks like a fancy lens. I wonder why the slower films have fallen out of favor? Cameras with faster shutter speeds? ND filters? Folks realizing they can stop down their lenses in strong light? ;-) I don't know how far you can pull film...? The manufacturer's literature doesn't seem to condone more than one stop, but I imagine they are being conservative. If you try to pull too far, what is the result?
4 years ago.
brian hefele has replied to Sixfootzero
The T is great. It's a little bit excessive at times (Kyocera's first creation after acquiring the Contax name… they let their Advanced Ceramics division have a little fun and design the synthetic ruby shutter release button… yeah, a little bit excessive at times…) and it's a pain to load reliably, and if it fails you're probably not going to get it fixed. But it's such a pleasant shooter, and the lens speaks for itself.

I guess faster film is more versatile, but if you're not hauling around a bunch of ND, and if you've super-glued all your aperture rings wide open (kidding!)… I don't know, to me it really isn't that versatile. Faster shutter speeds probably have a lot to do with the rise of fast film. Modern grain structures like TMAX and Delta simply allowing fast film with low grain certainly contributed (gotta make that R&D pay off!), and at some point I wouldn't be surprised if it was just a marketing game (Fuji's only got 1600? Well we've got 3200!). I tend to use 400 in the woods, especially when I know I'll be using filters or extension rings. 3200 for evenings occasionally, or to exploit the grain. But for daylight, cloud-cover, early evening, etc… In cameras that max out at 1/500 (or even 1/1000) and without filters cutting out the light… Heck even at EI 25 I'm not constantly wide open with the Contax. It's a shame. PanF+ is the slowest, easy to find film, I suppose, with a few offerings still around from Rollei. Losing Efke 25 was unfortunate.

As to how far can one pull… I think you risk grain getting kind of funky, exaggerated contrast… Part of the reason I did my first K100@25 in a Rodinal stand development was to hopefully tame the contrast a bit. Not sure if it worked but I'm pleased with the results and haven't tried anything else yet. Once Efke bit the dust I decided I had to figure out what I could pull to 25 and be happy with the results. Kentmere was cheap to experiment with, and so far has worked well as my commuter film.
4 years ago.
Sixfootzero
Sixfootzero
I noticed that the T, T2 & T3 are expensive, but missed the shutter release button thing... :-)
I thing you are on to something with the marketing thing. Everybody wants faster, faster, faster... I had the Minolta out on the beach with 400 film recently. (Smart? No, but there I was...) With several lenses that can only stop down to f/16 and a max shutter speed of 1/1000 I had to pull one stop to get good exposures. (I goofed the developing, of course, so the roll looked way under exposed...) The Autocord (Max 1/500) and Kodak Junior (Max 1/100) beg for slower emulsions. I will try to get my pull process technique down, then take the technique beyond its limit. It could be a fun exercise. 12? 6? Who knows? (I think the film speed dial on the Mamiya and/or Minolta goes down to 6, so it doesn't seem totally nuts.)

Maybe I am too new to 'real' cameras, but I like bokeh. I don't want these lenses to have to squint so hard. Even in summertime.... We'll see how this goes. :-)
4 years ago.