B.W. Hawaii

B.W. Hawaii

Posted on 12/07/2013


Photo taken on December  7, 2013


See also...


Authorizations, license

Visible by: Everyone
All rights reserved

102 visits

Hawaii National Guard

Hawaii National Guard
Mobilized immediately, our National Guard organized for defense along with the regular Army. Most of these men were Japanese-Americans, and thousands more volunteered. Due to racism, they were eventually sent to Europe where they became the most highly decorated division in WWII.

Comments
Buxtehude von Humperdinck
Buxtehude von Humper…
Yes! I love to hear about stories like this.
3 years ago.
tentmate has replied to Buxtehude von Humper…
so do I' even at a time of war our racist attitude dictates actions to the highest level.
3 years ago.
Buxtehude von Humperdinck
Buxtehude von Humper…
I apologize. I meant that I love stories where the racists are proven completely wrong about those they hate. Becoming the most highly decorated division in Europe is a slap in the face of anybody who approved of the forced relocations that took place back in the states. Even today, I am truly embarrassed whenever I am reminded of that retarded action more than 70 years ago.
3 years ago.
B.W. Hawaii has replied to Buxtehude von Humper…
In Hawaii, internment of Japanese-Americans was quickly abandoned, with the exception of a couple of hundred persons who were heavily involved in Japanese patriotic organizations or had close connections to the Japanese regime. The reasons for this were twofold. First, the economy and local war effort would have collapsed due to the sheer number of Japanese in important jobs. Second, the non-Japanese population wrote letters and made other contacts vouching for the loyalty of their Japanese neighbors. Still, there was a camp for much of the war, and efforts are under way to preserve its remains.
3 years ago.
Buxtehude von Humperdinck
Buxtehude von Humper…
When I was a kid and our family would go up to the High Sierras for a vacation, along the way was Manzanar, abandoned with just an old guard shack to indicate its military origins, at which we never stopped. It was used only as a way station for large road repair vehicles, but it had a plaque that barely indicated its purpose. Later, freer, wealthier, and much older then a kid is and has,I went back to the place, and found it to be a tourist attraction. The story was laid out plainly, and certain buildings had been reconstructed to lend a sense of the past. The original construction was done hastily, and bathrooms did not have partitions between the toilets, the bedding was filled with the brush and its attendant bugs from around the campsite, the rooms were insulated with tar paper and had only one small oil heater too weak for the large rooms, and all the while the whites who managed the place had much better facilities just on the other side of the fence, made of stone and cement. I spent all afternoon there, and left severely chastened, and much ashamed.
3 years ago. Edited 3 years ago.