Tony James

Tony James

Posted on 04/24/2015


Photo taken on April 24, 2015


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Keywords

Panama
Phasmid
Stick Insect
Gamboa


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A Pterinoxylus (?) Nymph

A Pterinoxylus (?) Nymph
Phasmidae Body length: ~50mm.

Found on our first night walk in Gamboa, this is a second Instar nymph which should turn out to be quite a large species.

Comments
Elias Franek
Elias Franek
Nice pic...Do you know the plant where you found it ?
17 months ago.
Tony James has replied to Elias Franek
Hi Elias! No, sorry. But it wasn't actually feeding on that when found. Often when looking for Phasmids, especially winged species, or very young instars, they will rest almost anywhere, and hardly ever on one that they are feeding on. The young are often in dispersal mode, so, if inactive like this one was, they are probably resting after clambering over various foliage routes. It was resting as you see it here, on top of the leaf, which is not usual for Phasmids which usually hang underneath the leaves to feed. All I can add is that it appeared to be a small tree sapling, around 1.5 metres tall in the border of the trail. I returned to this area a number of times after finding it, and although I searched the area thoroughly could find no more individuals. I have reared a Pterinoxylus species from Guadaloupe before so did recognise the similarity, and also, on a previous visit to the same place but further away, up a nearby track, I found a last instar female which was more than likely the same species. Again, though that one was hanging from an undergrowth creeper, there was no real indication that it was the foodplant. From previous experience, I knew the other species would eat Eucalyptus in the UK, and, in fact, the male nymph did as well when we got it home. As of this date, it is still alive.
17 months ago.
Elias Franek
Elias Franek
Hi ! I lived in french Guiana last year. It's an amazing stick-insect. In Brazil and Guiana there is also a species of pterinoxylus but it's very difficult to see this genus... I never found any specimen unfortunatly. I think you are Lucky to find it. I ask you about his food plant cause this can help easier to find some specimens. I hope so much discover one in his natural habitat ! :)
17 months ago.
Tony James has replied to Elias Franek
Hi Elias! Sorry I couldn't help, but this one is happily eating Eucalyptus at the moment. It is possible that it would eat other leaves as well. I don't actually look at specific foodplants, but find it best to go out in the evening with a hand light to scan low foliage along tracks. I find the best time to go out is about 2 hours after dark, as the insects then come out to feed, and are usually easier to see on the ends of branches, or at the top of foliage. I have a rule of thumb about Phasmids - but it is not conclusive - that if I see crickets, Mantids, and other insects out on foliage, then there is a good possibility that Phasmids would be present. You can get the idea from some of the other Phasmid pictures that I have put up, as I usually display the insect found as it was when I found it. Incidentally, I am rearing a species from French Guiana at the moment, which I got eggs from a friend in Europe. It is a large species called Cranidium gibbosum where the female is like a large elongated leaf. A beautiful species!
17 months ago.