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Women in Suburbia, 1963

Women in Suburbia, 1963
A fashion (in its day) photo for the Vintage Photos Theme Park.

This is a Kodachrome slide processed by Kodak in July 1963. The image shows two women and a small child posing for a photo among the orderly lawns and houses of a 1960s suburban development. The older woman is dressed up in a patterned dress, necklace, and earrings, while the younger one is wearing a striped cover over her dress.

The woman on the left is named Ethel (last name unknown), and she appears in other slides that I purchased along with this one. See, for instance, Ethel's Oil Painting, 1967.

Ethel's Oil Painting, 1967

John FitzGerald, Smiley Derleth have particularly liked this photo


Comments
 Deborah Lundbech
Deborah Lundbech club
If this was England in the 60s that cover would definitely be an apron.
Is it what used to be called a "duster"? (to protect the dress against housework dirt?)
Although I see a bit of dress showing in the back, so perhaps it's an apron, after all.
Look like Ethel had moved to a different suburb in the later shot.
6 weeks ago.
 Alan Mays
Alan Mays club
Thanks, Deborah! My knowledge of fashion and clothing is quite limited, so I wasn't certain what to call it. I pondered over "house dress," "smock," "apron," and "shift," but none of those seemed quite right, so I gave up and called it a generic "cover" since it looks like it's covering a pink dress.

As for Ethel, I'm guessing that she was visiting the younger women in this photo, so she may not have lived in the neighborhood. Ethel and perhaps the other woman are associated in some way (either relatives or acquaintances) with the Pipe-Smoking Man and His Family (also known as the "Yellow Socks Guys"—see Pipe-Smoking Man in Front of the Fireplace). I'm not sure how everyone is related—I'll have to scan more of the slides sometime to figure things out.
6 weeks ago.

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