Alan Mays

Alan Mays

Posted on 07/16/2015


Photo taken on July  6, 2015


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Philadelphia & Erie


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Philadelphia and Erie Railroad Ticket

Philadelphia and Erie Railroad Ticket
Despite its discoloration, this small novelty ticket for the Philadelphia and Erie Railroad (1861-1907) is notable for its use of rebuses (see my translations of the pictures, numbers, and letters below) to indicate the children's fares and to request that passengers keep their feet off the seats.

The back of the ticket (see below) indicates that this was a "Through Check." On railways where they're still used today, through checks are more commonly called seat checks. As I understand it, a conductor typically first inspects a passenger's train ticket, marks the destination on a seat check, and then places the check on or above the passenger's seat. This allows the conductor to keep track of passengers and which stops they need to get off at.

Apparently, T. E. Metzgar was the only conductor who used a seat check like this, since it specifies on the back, "Good for this day and train only. With any other conductor it is useless." My best guess, then, is that Metzgar had these printed himself and may have used them on special occasions or perhaps just for children. Has anyone else seen anything similar?

Philadelphia & Erie R.R.

Rebus: "Key-P UR Boots & Shoes off the Seats."
Translation: "Keep your boots and shoes off the seats."

T. E. Metzgar, conductor.

Rebus: "5 Children Free."
Translation: "Children under 5, free."

Rebus: "12 Children 5 Half Fare"
Translation: "Children over 5 and under 12, half fare."

Philadelphia and Erie Railroad Ticket

Smiley Derleth, wintorbos, chris baker have particularly liked this photo


Comments
wintorbos
wintorbos
Interesting that kids today use "UR" for "your" in their text messages. Apparently, their ancestors would have known what they meant.
2 years ago.
Alan Mays has replied to wintorbos
Very interesting observation! What's old is new again, I suppose. 8-)
2 years ago.
Smiley Derleth
Smiley Derleth
Very nice piece.
2 years ago.
Alan Mays has replied to Smiley Derleth
Thanks, Smiley!
2 years ago.