Joel Messinger

Joel Messinger

Posted on 03/23/2009


Photo taken on March 23, 2009



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Stuttgart
Felder
Maurer


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191 Felder-MaurerGermanySummer1914

191 Felder-MaurerGermanySummer1914
In the summer of 1914 Louis Felder took a trip to Germany to visit his relatives there. On board ship, enroute, he met a German steward who talked German to him which helped him regain his ability to converse in German. There, in Stuttgart he met his Uncle Gottlob and his family. Among other things he visited the Black Forest and took a ride on a Zeppelin (an hour long ride). He made it out of Europe (and back home) just as the First World War was starting.
Uncle Gottlob is seated on the left. Seated at the right is his daughter Johanna Maurer (née Felder); and seated in front is supposedly a "Werner Maurer" (but not Johanna's son, Werner, who was born only two months before the photo; so, maybe it was a brother-in-law of hers). Standing at left is Amelie Bayha (a niece of Gottlob's), then Maria (Gottlob's daughter and future wife of Rudolf Hauser), then Louis himself, then Elisabeth, wife of the man next to her, Immanuel (with the mustache, Gottlob's older son), then Friedrich (Immanuel's younger brother), and then Margarete (née Pfleiderer), Friedrich's wife.
Immanuel, a merchant or storekeeper ("Kaufmann" is what it says here in the genealogical essay) was killed in action near Beaumont, France on Christmas, 1915.

Matthäus Felder has particularly liked this photo


9 comments - The latest ones
Matthäus Felder
Matthäus Felder
Nice to finally see this photo in halftones. I agree with most of your description, but Margarete Pfleiderer is not in the picture, Friedrich only married her in 1920. May be he had a girl-friend before (?). Keep in touch!
www.felder.tribalpages.com/tribe/browse?userid=felder&view=0&pid=258&rand=827127958
8 years ago. Edited 8 years ago.
Joel Messinger
Joel Messinger
I identified the individuals in the photo according to what was written on the scrapbook page next to the picture. I believe this 'Felder Family' scrapbook was prepared in the late 1970s. (The writing is all in the same blue ink pen; and it ends in 1978.)
Anyway, that's the only picture I'm aware of of Louis' trip to Germany (other than the Liebenzell Erholungshaus postcard). Do you know of any others?
Nobody even took a picture of the Zeppelin! (I have a great book on Zeppelins, "Dr. Eckener's Dream Machine" by Douglas Botting.)
8 years ago. Edited 8 years ago.
Joel Messinger
Joel Messinger
Oh, you kow what? I think I figured out who that kid is in front. Do you remember translating those letters that (I guess) that Marietta (Felder) Henry sent to you ten years ago or so? I'm looking at an old Felder Familienbrief with Friedrich's letter to George (of Michigan), dated 31 Oct., 1920. In it he describes the passing away of your great-grandfather Gottlob. But he also mentions that Johannes Maurer (whom your great aunt Johanna married) had a family before he married her. (Obviously, he was widowed, and johanna was his second wife.) Apparently he already had a daughter and a son by his first wife. The daughter, he describes as a "warrior's widow" (remember, this is 1920 when he is writing), and that "the son was killed in action". (So, he lost his son and his son-in-law. Friedrich doesn't give the names for either of Maurer's children.) That kid in this picture, no doubt, would have been conscripted within the next four years of that picture (unless he had a medical deferment). The person taking the photograph could very likely have been Johannes Maurer, himself (who lived to the age of 85, according to your genealogy).
That makes this photo a sad one, certainly a poignant one: two of the five men in it would perish in the war that began that summer.
8 years ago.
Matthäus Felder has replied to Joel Messinger
Joel, my parents had only temporary contact to the Maurers. I’ll have to ask my mother, to whom I am to turn to get more information about all that. I remember very weakly Johanna, my great aunt. Sure, Zeppelin is fascinating. We visited 2 museums about Z. on Lake Constance (Friedrichshafen, Meersburg).
8 years ago.
Matthäus Felder
Matthäus Felder
Sure, the Felder Familienbrief gives us the answer:
"Standing – l. to r..
1. old lady Sister in law of uncle
2. Marie
3. L. W. Felder – Fulton, Ind.
4. Helena Maurer Step Dau. of Johanna
5. Immanuel
6. Friedrich
7. Elisabeth Wife of Immanuel
Sitting
Uncle Gottlob
Johanna Maurer
Erich Maurer Killed in action"
8 years ago.
Joel Messinger
Joel Messinger
Thank you for the corrections. Yep. So, that's two of these men who died in the war and two of the women who were widowed (Helena also losing her husband in addition to her brother).
But, Johanna (seated at right) lives to the ripe old age of 94 (it says she died 1970 in your Felder tribalpages). It's amazing how much history she got to see and experience, including a lot of technological change: from the first practical automobiles (Daimler, developed and manufactured near her home --inspite of what our esteemed president, Barack Obama, may say...) and Zeppelins to anti-biotics and inter-continental flight to supersonic flight and Man landing on the Moon. I don't think either of us will see change so impressive.
8 years ago. Edited 8 years ago.
Joel Messinger
Joel Messinger
The next time our president makes a state visit to your part of the world, you (as an official) can point out where the automobile was really invented. :)

(Sigh)...If he'd only made that flub in front of the Siegersäule last summer! We'd be saying "President McCain" now. Oh, well... :(

(Did your sister and brother-in-law go and see that?)
8 years ago.
Matthäus Felder
Matthäus Felder
8 years ago. Edited 8 years ago.
Matthäus Felder
Matthäus Felder
I found the Maurer’s grave:
http://www.ipernity.com/doc/m.felder/7884369
7 years ago.