Roy Lowry

Roy Lowry

Posted on 07/03/2015


Photo taken on June 29, 2015



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Keywords

azure damselfly
Coenagrion puella
Burton Mere Wetlands
Canon EF300mm f/2.8L IS II USM +2x
Canon EOS-1D X


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Azure Damselflies Ovipositing

Azure Damselflies Ovipositing
Two pairs of azure damselfly laying eggs in the roots of an uprooted reed mace at Burton Mere Wetlands.

John Linton, David Hodson, Tractacus, Kenny and 3 other people have particularly liked this photo


12 comments - The latest ones
Gerard Perin
Gerard Perin
magnifique
2 years ago.
Roy Lowry has replied to Gerard Perin
Merci beaucoup Gerard.
2 years ago.
Grisly (Roger)
Grisly (Roger)
Patience paid off Roy , a magnificent capture.
2 years ago.
Roy Lowry has replied to Grisly (Roger)
Many thanks Roger. Took a bit of warm weather to get the action going!
2 years ago.
Stormlizard
Stormlizard
Fantastic capture Roy.
2 years ago.
Roy Lowry has replied to Stormlizard
Many thanks John.
2 years ago.
Derek's Wildlife Photography
Derek's Wildlife Pho…
super work Roy, I tied the dragons but they were flying about to must to capture them
2 years ago.
Roy Lowry has replied to Derek's Wildlife Pho…
Many thanks Derek. Put flight shots into the 'too hard' basket a while back!
2 years ago.
Jaap van 't Veen
Jaap van 't Veen
Stunning close-up.
Congrats on Explore.
2 years ago.
Roy Lowry has replied to Jaap van 't Veen
Many thanks Jaap.
2 years ago.
David Hodson
David Hodson
Well seen a captured. The tap root of the reed mace is edible and quite tasty, It should be several inch's long and after you peel the brown coating off, it is pure white, best eaten raw. It is high in starch and is good for energy, with little effort put in to harvest it.
2 years ago.
Roy Lowry has replied to David Hodson
Many thanks David. Not sure how the reserve management would take to such activities!
2 years ago.