Breakfast in Bavaria

Bavaria / Bayern


All these photos just have in common, that they were taken in Bavaria

Andechs

01 Feb 2010 54
A view from the "holy mountain of Andechs" south to the Alps. Luck left the House of Andechs Merania exactly on Juin 21, 1208. That day King Philip of Swabia was murdered during the wedding of his niece Beatrix and Otto VII of Andechs-Merania. Immidiatly the House of Andechs-Merania was under suspect - and witin short time lost all their land, properties and political power. Even the castle in Andechs got destroyed. Though it was soon known, that Otto VIII. of Wittelsbach stabbed the king, the House of Wittelsbach was the great winner of the situation. From that time on, they played a very important role as "The royal family of Bavaria". Current head today is Franz, Duke of Bavaria, born 1933, great-grandson of the last King of Bavaria, Ludwig III.

Schondorf - St. Jakobus

01 Feb 2010 52
A busy day. A truck from the "Franziskaner"-brewery just arrived and now parks behind the St. Jakobus church, built around 1200 and only meters away from the Ammersee. There is not much to see. It has a simple and clear structure, but there is a "special". It has an upper floor, that can be reached via a staircase inside. The patrozinium "Jakobus" connects the little church with the medieval pilgrimage and coming from east, having just crossed the lake, this was for sure an ideal place to stay overnight. So the room upstairs was probably used as a dormatory for pilgrims before.

Schondorf - St. Jakobus

01 Feb 2010 59
See the apse of "St. Jakobus" to the right - and a bavarian pub and beer garden to the left. This combination may have started, when the church was built. So here the pilgrims could have dinner, before the went up the stairs into the dormitory - centuries ago. Actually the floor in the church still exists, but is not used as a dorm any longer. The symbiosis of pub and church is still very strong in Bavaria. The strongest it is in nearby Andechs. But that is another story.

Schondorf - Ammersee

01 Feb 2010 56
The church St. Jakobus was built on a little hump, only a few meters away from the Ammersee. Standing there and looking south, you can see the Alps.

Possenhofen S-Bahn Station

01 Feb 2010 61
The station of Possenhofen, a village on the Lake Starnberg, 30kms southwest of Munich. The bavarian royality owned a chateau in Possenhofen and to have a conveniant access, bavarian King Maximilian II had this station built in 1865. Elisabeth of Bavaria (aka "Sisi") spouse of Francis Joseph I, Empress of Austria, Queen of Hungary, Croatia and Bohemia, spent her youth here. Later she often returned for holidays, using custombuilt "imperial waggons", that parked here. Now it is "only" a station of the S-Bahn, the Munich suburban railway, but inside is a little "Sisi-Museum", officially named "Kaiserin Elisabeth Museum".

Feldafing S-Bahn Station

01 Feb 2010 93
As King Maximilian II had another summerhouse on the romantic "Roseninsel", a tiny island in the Lake Starnberg, sometimes he or "Sisi" left the train in Feldafing. So this village got a station very similar to that in nearby Possenhofen. It looks like Tuskan villa. The station nowadays is pretty rotten. Kibri, a producer of plastic toys and kits, offered over years a scale model (1:87 = H0) of this station for railway modelling.

Feldafing S-Bahn Station

01 Feb 2010 49
The Feldafing station (seen from the "railside") needs more than just love and care. There are discussions about buying it from "Deutsche Bahn". The local mayor would like to see a restaurant in the building, but that is probably a long way. If you compare this photo to thatone of the station in Possenhofen, you´ll see their "cousinship".

Igling

01 Feb 2010 1 1 58
I could hear the owner of that bike playing the organ in the little chapel. So I entered and listened for a while. The chapel was on the end of the village, off a residential street, named "Roemerstrasse". Here had been the roman road leading south from Augsburg (founded 15bC as "Augusta Vindelicorum" - and so being the second oldest town/city in Germany.)

Ettal - Kloster

01 Feb 2010 54
Peeping over the wall. Maybe here is the well known boarding school, existing since more than 250 years. In February 2010 ths boardings school entered the news, as one of the scandalous places, where minors were abused. The abbot and the prior have resigned meanwhile.

Ettal - Kloster

01 Feb 2010 52
The buildings we see today were all built after the big fire of 1744. After the rebuilding lots of pilgrims walked up the valley to the abbey-church, to see the miraculous statue of St. Mary, that is still here. The Ettal abbey owns a couple of guesthouses and pubs, a brewery (since 1609), a cheese-factory and a destillery. Actually I do prefer the beer from Kloster Andechs. The herbal schnaps is green - and comes in a bootle looking like one of the smaller steeples of the church. Tres chic!

Ettal - Kloster

01 Feb 2010 56
The fresco under the dome. Unfortunately I did not dare to lay down on to the ground in the center. And I did not know, if, in case I would do it, I would be able to get up again without help. Next time, I´ll try to do..

Ettal - Kloster

01 Feb 2010 50
The small village of Ettal (pop. 800) has two main tourist-attractions. 1. "Schloss Linderhof", a fairy-tale castles bavarian King Ludwig II has built mid 19th century. 2. The Benedictine abbey "Kloster Ettal". - I just visited the abbey, that was founded 1330. Nothing out of the early time seems to have survived. All what is to see now is baroque - and it is really big. The dome of the church towers above the village.

Nuremberg / Nuernberg - Langwasser

01 Mar 2010 88
Looking out of the window on an early morning. There is more than just romantic views for the speedy tourists in Nuremberg. Especially in Nuremberg-Langwasser. Phil Collins has lived here. He watched the sun rising over the houses, before he wrote "Another day in Paradise". - No! Phil has never been here. Françoise Sagan has lived here, when she wrote "Bonjour tristesse". - No! Françoise has never been here. But I stayed here overnight. Somehow, this could be anywhere - on the northern hemisphere.

Moosburg - St. Kastulus

01 Apr 2012 110
End of the 8th century a monastery existed here, owning the relics of Saint Kastulus, that had been "translated" to Moosburg from Rome. This monastery was converted into a collegiate, after the last Benedictian monks had moved to Weihenstephan Abbey in 1021. After the old abbey church had collapsed the erection of a new church started in 1170. This was done under the guidance of Albert I. (aka Adalbert I.), the Bishop of Freising and so there are many parallels between these two large structures, built during his time. The Freising Cathedral was the first large brick building in Bavaria (after the Romans had left) - and St. Kastulus in Moosburg was the second. The Gothic choir added to St. Kastulus later cannot be seen from this pov. The left tower is the tower of the former parish church St. John the Baptist.

Moosburg - St. Kastulus

01 Apr 2012 97
End of the 8th century a monastery existed here, owning the relics of Saint Kastulus, that had been "translated" to Moosburg from Rome. This monastery was converted into a collegiate, after the last Benedictian monks had moved to Weihenstephan Abbey in 1021. After the old abbey church had collapsed the erection of a new church started in 1170. This was done under the guidance of Albert I. (aka Adalbert I.), the Bishop of Freising and so there are many parallels between these two large structures. The Freising Cathedral was the first large brick building in Bavaria (after the Romans had left) - and St. Kastulus in Moosburg was the second. Only the imposant tower of St. Kastulus is seen to the right. It has a kind of "campanile.design", maybe the architects came from Northern Italy. The red roof is a creation of the 19th century. The church (and tower) to the left is St. John the Baptist, a former parish church.

Moosburg - St. Kastulus

01 Apr 2012 119
End of the 8th century a monastery existed here, displaying the relics of martyr Saint Kastulus, that had been "translated" to Moosburg from Rome. This monastery was converted into a noble collegiate, after the last Benedictian monks had moved to Weihenstephan Abbey in 1021. After the old abbey church had collapsed the erection of a new church started in 1170. The building was done under the guidance of the Bishop of Freising Albert I. (aka Adalbert I.) and so there are many parallels between these two large structures, built during his time. The Freising Cathedral was the first large brick building in Bavaria (after the Romans had left) - and St. Kastulus in Moosburg was the second. Since the secularisation (1803) the church serves as a parish church. The Gothic choir added to St. Kastulus in 1468 can be seen from this pov. It is higher than the Romanesque nave. The red roof of the massive campanile-like tower is a creation of the 19th century.

Moosburg - St. Kastulus

30 Apr 2012 146
End of the 8th century a monastery existed here, displaying the relics of martyr Saint Kastulus, that had been "translated" to Moosburg from Rome. This monastery was converted into a noble collegiate, after the last Benedictian monks had moved to Weihenstephan Abbey in 1021. After the old abbey church had collapsed the erection of a new church started in 1170. The building was done under the guidance of the Bishop of Freising Albert I. (aka Adalbert I.) and so there are many parallels between these two large structures, built during his time. The Freising Cathedral was the first large brick building in Bavaria (after the Romans had left) - and St. Kastulus in Moosburg was the second. Since the secularisation (1803) the church serves as a parish church. The Gothic choir was added to the Romanesque basilica in 1468 As it is higher than the nave, sunlight floods in from here. The late Gothic altar in the center is a major work of sculptor Hans Leinberger, one of the most reputed artists in Bavaria. He carved the retable 1514/15.

Moosburg - St. Kastulus

01 Apr 2012 92
End of the 8th century a monastery existed here, displaying the relics of martyr Saint Kastulus, that had been "translated" to Moosburg from Rome. This monastery was converted into a noble collegiate, after the last Benedictian monks had moved to Weihenstephan Abbey in 1021. After the old abbey church had collapsed the erection of a new church started in 1170. The building was done under the guidance of the Bishop of Freising Albert I. (aka Adalbert I.) and so there are many parallels between these two large structures, built during his time. The Freising Cathedral was the first large brick building in Bavaria (after the Romans had left) - and St. Kastulus in Moosburg was the second. Since the secularisation (1803) the church serves as a parish church. The grimacing monkey is a detail of the choir stalls.

130 items in total