Mantova - Piazza Sordello

Lombardia / Lombardy / Lombardei


All photos were taken in the "Regione Lombardia" on different occasions.

Mantova - Piazza Sordello

01 Mar 2014 1 159
Mantua (ital. Mantova) was a settlemt on the banks of River Mincio in Etruscan times. In Roman times veteran soldiers were placed here. About 70 BC the Roman poet Virgil (aka "Publius Vergilius Maro") was born nearby. After the end of the Roman Empire Mantua was invaded in turn by Goths, Byzantines, Longobards, and Franks. In the 11th century, Mantua became a possession of Boniface of Canossa, marquis of Tuscany. During the 12th century the course of the River Mincio was altered, creating lakes, to reinforce the city's natural protection. Three of these lakes still remains today. Under the House of Gonzaga, that ruled Mantua for more than three centuries (sometimes in a very despotic way), the city developed and became a center of Renaissance art. At the end of the long war of the Mantuan Succession the city was under Austrian rule. Mantua was part of the Napoleon's Kingdom of Italy. Mantua returned to Austria in 1814. Agitation against A revolt against the Austrians lasted from 1851 to 1855, but it was finally suppressed by the Austrian army. Finally in 1866 Mantua and the Lombardy were incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy. Sunday market on the Piazza Sordello. Seen here is on the right side of the piazza is the front of the huge Palazzo Ducale (350 rooms!), the former residence of the Gonzaga family. The white Baroque facade (and the campanile) of the "Duomo di Mantova" (see previous upload). The white building to the left is the" Palazzo Vescovile", the residence of the Bishop.

Mantova - Duomo di Mantova

01 Mar 2014 1 262
Mantua (ital. Mantova) was a settlemt on the banks of River Mincio in Etruscan times. In Roman times veteran soldiers were placed here. About 70 BC the Roman poet Virgil (aka "Publius Vergilius Maro") was born nearby. After the end of the Roman Empire Mantua was invaded in turn by Goths, Byzantines, Longobards, and Franks. In the 11th century, Mantua became a possession of Boniface of Canossa, marquis of Tuscany. During the 12th century the course of the River Mincio was altered, creating lakes, to reinforce the city's natural protection. Three of these lakes still remains today. Under the House of Gonzaga, that ruled Mantua for more than three centuries (sometimes in a very despotic way), the city developed and became a center of Renaissance art. At the end of the long war of the Mantuan Succession the city was under Austrian rule. Mantua was part of the Napoleon's Kingdom of Italy. Mantua returned to Austria in 1814. A revolt against the Austrians lasted from 1851 to 1855, but it was finally suppressed by the Austrian army. Finally in 1866 Mantua and the Lombardy were incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy. Here is the "Duomo di Mantova", built in 1395–1401. The campanile is probably older, the Baroque facade was completed in 1761.

Mantova - Arcades

01 Jun 2015 1 1 156
Mantua (ital. Mantova) was a settlemt on the banks of River Mincio in Etruscan times. In Roman times veteran soldiers were placed here. About 70 BC the Roman poet Virgil (aka "Publius Vergilius Maro") was born nearby. After the end of the Roman Empire Mantua was invaded in turn by Goths, Byzantines, Longobards, and Franks. In the 11th century, Mantua became a possession of Boniface of Canossa, marquis of Tuscany. During the 12th century the course of the River Mincio was altered, creating lakes, to reinforce the city's natural protection. Three of these lakes still remains today. Under the House of Gonzaga, that ruled Mantua for more than three centuries (sometimes in a very despotic way), the city developed and became a center of Renaissance art. At the end of the long war of the Mantuan Succession the city was under Austrian rule. Mantua was part of the Napoleon's Kingdom of Italy. Mantua returned to Austria in 1814. Agitation against A revolt against the Austrians lasted from 1851 to 1855, but it was finally suppressed by the Austrian army. Finally in 1866 Mantua and the Lombardy were incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy. Under the shady arcades, that connect the different piazzas, are numerous pavement cafes and restaurants.

Mantova - Basilica di Sant'Andrea

01 Mar 2014 215
Mantua (ital. Mantova) was a settlemt on the banks of River Mincio in Etruscan times. In Roman times veteran soldiers were placed here. About 70 BC the Roman poet Virgil (aka "Publius Vergilius Maro") was born nearby. After the end of the Roman Empire Mantua was invaded in turn by Goths, Byzantines, Longobards, and Franks. In the 11th century, Mantua became a possession of Boniface of Canossa, marquis of Tuscany. During the 12th century the course of the River Mincio was altered, creating lakes, to reinforce the city's natural protection. Three of these lakes still remains today. Under the House of Gonzaga, that ruled Mantua for more than three centuries (sometimes in a very despotic way), the city developed and became a center of Renaissance art. At the end of the long war of the Mantuan Succession the city was under Austrian rule. Mantua was part of the Napoleon's Kingdom of Italy. Mantua returned to Austria in 1814. Agitation against A revolt against the Austrians lasted from 1851 to 1855, but it was finally suppressed by the Austrian army. Finally in 1866 Mantua and the Lombardy were incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy. The construction of the Basilica of Sant'Andrea, commissioned by Ludovico III Gonzaga, started in 1462 according to designs by Leon Battista Alberti, one of the "Renaissance Men" like Galileo and da Vinci being author, architect, poet, philosopher.. The building was finished only 328 years later. It houses a Holy Blood Relic ("Preziosissimo Sangue di Cristo"). The relic was "rediscovered" here within the 11th century connected to a legend, that told, that Roman centurion Longinus had brought it to Mantua. The body of Longinus was "rediscovered" in Mantua in 1304, together with the "Holy Sponge".

Mantova - Basilica di Sant'Andrea

01 Mar 2014 257
Mantua (ital. Mantova) was a settlemt on the banks of River Mincio in Etruscan times. In Roman times veteran soldiers were placed here. About 70 BC the Roman poet Virgil (aka "Publius Vergilius Maro") was born nearby. After the end of the Roman Empire Mantua was invaded in turn by Goths, Byzantines, Longobards, and Franks. In the 11th century, Mantua became a possession of Boniface of Canossa, marquis of Tuscany. During the 12th century the course of the River Mincio was altered, creating lakes, to reinforce the city's natural protection. Three of these lakes still remains today. Under the House of Gonzaga, that ruled Mantua for more than three centuries (sometimes in a very despotic way), the city developed and became a center of Renaissance art. At the end of the long war of the Mantuan Succession the city was under Austrian rule. Mantua was part of the Napoleon's Kingdom of Italy. Mantua returned to Austria in 1814. Agitation against A revolt against the Austrians lasted from 1851 to 1855, but it was finally suppressed by the Austrian army. Finally in 1866 Mantua and the Lombardy were incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy. The construction of the Basilica of Sant'Andrea, commissioned by Ludovico III Gonzaga, started in 1462 according to designs by Leon Battista Alberti, one of the "Renaissance Men" like Galileo and da Vinci being author, architect, poet, philosopher.. The massive dome, seen here, was designed by Filippo Juvarra. The building was finished only 328 years later. It houses a Holy Blood Relic ("Preziosissimo Sangue di Cristo"). The relic was "rediscovered" here within the 11th century connected to a legend, that told, that Roman centurion Longinus had brought it to Mantua.

Mantova - Rotonda di San Lorenzo

01 Mar 2014 155
Mantua (ital. Mantova) was a settlemt on the banks of River Mincio in Etruscan times. In Roman times veteran soldiers were placed here. About 70 BC the Roman poet Virgil (aka "Publius Vergilius Maro") was born nearby. After the end of the Roman Empire Mantua was invaded in turn by Goths, Byzantines, Longobards, and Franks. In the 11th century, Mantua became a possession of Boniface of Canossa, marquis of Tuscany. During the 12th century the course of the River Mincio was altered, creating lakes, to reinforce the city's natural protection. Three of these lakes still remains today. Under the House of Gonzaga, that ruled Mantua for more than three centuries (sometimes in a very despotic way), the city developed and became a center of Renaissance art. At the end of the long war of the Mantuan Succession the city was under Austrian rule. Mantua was part of the Napoleon's Kingdom of Italy, the city returned to Austria in 1814. A revolt against the Austrians was suppressed by the Austrian army in 1855. Finally in 1866 Mantua and the Lombardy were incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy. The "Rotonda di San Lorenzo" is the oldest structure in Mantua, going back to the 11th century. This was the building I was most interested in in Mantua. The rotunda was open for visitors, but, just like the neighbouring "Palazzo della Ragione", the church was hidden under a scaffolding. I learned from a construction worker, that within the next weeks, the renovation of the round church would be completed. So I had to return to Mantua - later again.

Mantova - Rotonda di San Lorenzo

01 Mar 2014 1 176
Mantua (ital. Mantova) was a settlemt on the banks of River Mincio in Etruscan times. In Roman times veteran soldiers were placed here. About 70 BC the Roman poet Virgil (aka "Publius Vergilius Maro") was born nearby. After the end of the Roman Empire Mantua was invaded in turn by Goths, Byzantines, Longobards, and Franks. In the 11th century, Mantua became a possession of Boniface of Canossa, marquis of Tuscany. During the 12th century the course of the River Mincio was altered, creating lakes, to reinforce the city's natural protection. Three of these lakes still remains today. Under the House of Gonzaga, that ruled Mantua for more than three centuries (sometimes in a very despotic way), the city developed and became a center of Renaissance art. At the end of the long war of the Mantuan Succession the city was under Austrian rule. Mantua was part of the Napoleon's Kingdom of Italy, the city returned to Austria in 1814. A revolt against the Austrians was suppressed by the Austrian army in 1855. Finally in 1866 Mantua and the Lombardy were incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy. The "Rotonda di San Lorenzo", here seen from the Piazza della Erbe, is the oldest structure in Mantua, going back to the 11th century. This was the building I was most interested in in Mantua. The rotunda was open for visitors, but, just like the neighbouring "Palazzo della Ragione", the church was hidden under a scaffolding. I learned from a construction worker, that within the next weeks, the renovation of the round church would be completed. So I had to return to Mantua - later again.

Mantova - Rotonda di San Lorenzo

01 Jun 2015 3 2 262
Mantua (ital. Mantova) was a settlemt on the banks of River Mincio in Etruscan times. In Roman times veteran soldiers were placed here. About 70 BC the Roman poet Virgil was born nearby. After the end of the Roman Empire Mantua was invaded in turn by Goths, Byzantines, Longobards, and Franks. In the 11th century, Mantua became a possession of Boniface of Canossa, marquis of Tuscany. During the 12th century the course of the River Mincio was altered, creating lakes, to reinforce the city's natural protection. Three of these lakes still remains today. Under the House of Gonzaga, that ruled Mantua for more than three centuries (sometimes in a very despotic way), the city developed and became a center of Renaissance art. At the end of the long war of the Mantuan Succession the city was under Austrian rule. Mantua was part of the Napoleon's Kingdom of Italy, the city returned to Austria in 1814. A revolt against the Austrians was suppressed by the Austrian army in 1855. Finally in 1866 Mantua and the Lombardy were incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy. A year later (see previous upload) all scaffoldings were gone.. The "Rotonda di San Lorenzo" is the oldest structure in Mantua, going back to the 11th century. This was during the reign of the Canossa family, so the building is often connected to Matilda of Canossa (aka "Matilda of Tuscany"), a powerful supporter of Pope Gregory VII during the Investiture Controversy. But actually there is no proof. The design is for sure inspired by the Holy Sepulchre church in Jerusalem. The church fell in disrepair and got deconsecrated in 1579. The building was used storage room, as well for dwellings and shops. About two centuries later, the church was completely forgotten but it got rediscovered end of the 19th century. 1909 - 1911 the building got reconstructed. All external additions got removed. As the roof was missing, designs from other rotundas in Northern Italy were studied - and so today the church looks perfect.

Mantova - Rotonda di San Lorenzo

01 Jun 2015 2 211
Mantua (ital. Mantova) was a settlemt on the banks of River Mincio in Etruscan times. In Roman times veteran soldiers were placed here. About 70 BC the Roman poet Virgil was born nearby. After the end of the Roman Empire Mantua was invaded in turn by Goths, Byzantines, Longobards, and Franks. In the 11th century, Mantua became a possession of Boniface of Canossa, marquis of Tuscany. During the 12th century the course of the River Mincio was altered, creating lakes, to reinforce the city's natural protection. Three of these lakes still remains today. Under the House of Gonzaga, that ruled Mantua for more than three centuries (sometimes in a very despotic way), the city developed and became a center of Renaissance art. At the end of the long war of the Mantuan Succession the city was under Austrian rule. Mantua was part of the Napoleon's Kingdom of Italy, the city returned to Austria in 1814. A revolt against the Austrians was suppressed by the Austrian army in 1855. Finally in 1866 Mantua and the Lombardy were incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy. The "Rotonda di San Lorenzo" is the oldest structure in Mantua, going back to the 11th century. This was during the reign of the Canossa family, so the building is often connected to Matilda of Canossa (aka "Matilda of Tuscany"), a powerful supporter of Pope Gregory VII during the Investiture Controversy. But actually there is no proof. The design is for sure inspired by the Holy Sepulchre church in Jerusalem. The church fell in disrepair and got deconsecrated in 1579. It was used as a storage room, dwellings and shops. About two centuries later, the church was completely forgotten but got rediscovered end of the 19th century. 1909 - 1911 the building got reconstructed. All external additions got removed, so the brickwork, typical for lombardian architecture of the 11th century, van be seen. As the roof was missing, designs from other rotundas in Northern Italy were studied - and so today the church looks perfect. Seen from this pov is, that the rotunda is "sunken" below the street level. A flight of stairs runs down to the entrance. The neighbouring "Palazzo della Ragione", only 2 centuries younger, is on the piazza´s street level. The reason may be, that the church was built on the round foundations of an ancient Roman temple, dedicated to Venus.

Mantova - Rotonda di San Lorenzo

01 Mar 2014 167
Mantua (ital. Mantova) was a settlemt on the banks of River Mincio in Etruscan times. In Roman times veteran soldiers were placed here. About 70 BC the Roman poet Virgil was born nearby. After the end of the Roman Empire Mantua was invaded in turn by Goths, Byzantines, Longobards, and Franks. In the 11th century, Mantua became a possession of Boniface of Canossa, marquis of Tuscany. During the 12th century the course of the River Mincio was altered, creating lakes, to reinforce the city's natural protection. Three of these lakes still remains today. Under the House of Gonzaga, that ruled Mantua for more than three centuries (sometimes in a very despotic way), the city developed and became a center of Renaissance art. At the end of the long war of the Mantuan Succession the city was under Austrian rule. Mantua was part of the Napoleon's Kingdom of Italy, the city returned to Austria in 1814. A revolt against the Austrians was suppressed by the Austrian army in 1855. Finally in 1866 Mantua and the Lombardy were incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy. The "Rotonda di San Lorenzo" is the oldest structure in Mantua, going back to the 11th century. This was during the reign of the Canossa family, so the building is often connected to Matilda of Canossa (aka "Matilda of Tuscany"), a powerful supporter of Pope Gregory VII during the Investiture Controversy. But actually there is no proof. The design is for sure inspired by the Holy Sepulchre church in Jerusalem. The church fell in disrepair and got deconsecrated in 1579. It was used as a storage room, dwellings and shops. About two centuries later, the church was completely forgotten but got rediscovered end of the 19th century. 1909 - 1911 the building got reconstructed. All external additions got removed, so the brickwork, typical for lombardian architecture of the 11th century, van be seen. As the roof was missing, designs from other rotundas in Northern Italy were studied - and so today the church looks perfect. The rotunda is "sunken" below the street level. A flight of stairs runs down to the entrance. The reason may be, that the church was built on the round foundations of an ancient Roman temple, dedicated to Venus.

Mantova - Rotonda di San Lorenzo

01 Mar 2014 2 1 170
Mantua (ital. Mantova) was a settlemt on the banks of River Mincio in Etruscan times. In Roman times veteran soldiers were placed here. About 70 BC the Roman poet Virgil was born nearby. After the end of the Roman Empire Mantua was invaded in turn by Goths, Byzantines, Longobards, and Franks. In the 11th century, Mantua became a possession of Boniface of Canossa, marquis of Tuscany. During the 12th century the course of the River Mincio was altered, creating lakes, to reinforce the city's natural protection. Three of these lakes still remains today. Under the House of Gonzaga, that ruled Mantua for more than three centuries (sometimes in a very despotic way), the city developed and became a center of Renaissance art. At the end of the long war of the Mantuan Succession the city was under Austrian rule. Mantua was part of the Napoleon's Kingdom of Italy, the city returned to Austria in 1814. A revolt against the Austrians was suppressed by the Austrian army in 1855. Finally in 1866 Mantua and the Lombardy were incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy. The "Rotonda di San Lorenzo" is the oldest structure in Mantua, going back to the 11th century. This was during the reign of the Canossa family, so the building is often connected to Matilda of Canossa (aka "Matilda of Tuscany"), a powerful supporter of Pope Gregory VII during the Investiture Controversy. But actually there is no proof. The design is for sure inspired by the Holy Sepulchre church in Jerusalem. The church fell in disrepair and got deconsecrated in 1579. It was used as a storage room, dwellings and shops. About two centuries later, the church was completely forgotten but got rediscovered end of the 19th century. 1909 - 1911 the building got reconstructed. All external additions got removed, so the brickwork, typical for lombardian architecture of the 11th century, van be seen. As the roof was missing, designs from other rotundas in Northern Italy were studied - and so today the church looks perfect. The rotunda is "sunken" below the street level. A flight of stairs runs down to the entrance. The reason may be, that the church was built on the round foundations of an ancient Roman temple, dedicated to Venus. The two pillars seen here are spolia, they are reused Roman works. Traces of frescoes can still be seen up on the walls.

Mantova - Rotonda di San Lorenzo

01 Jun 2015 2 305
Mantua (ital. Mantova) was a settlemt on the banks of River Mincio in Etruscan times. In Roman times veteran soldiers were placed here. About 70 BC the Roman poet Virgil was born nearby. After the end of the Roman Empire Mantua was invaded in turn by Goths, Byzantines, Longobards, and Franks. In the 11th century, Mantua became a possession of Boniface of Canossa, marquis of Tuscany. During the 12th century the course of the River Mincio was altered, creating lakes, to reinforce the city's natural protection. Three of these lakes still remains today. Under the House of Gonzaga, that ruled Mantua for more than three centuries (sometimes in a very despotic way), the city developed and became a center of Renaissance art. At the end of the long war of the Mantuan Succession the city was under Austrian rule. Mantua was part of the Napoleon's Kingdom of Italy, the city returned to Austria in 1814. A revolt against the Austrians was suppressed by the Austrian army in 1855. Finally in 1866 Mantua and the Lombardy were incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy. The "Rotonda di San Lorenzo" is the oldest structure in Mantua, going back to the 11th century. This was during the reign of the Canossa family, so the building is often connected to Matilda of Canossa (aka "Matilda of Tuscany"), a powerful supporter of Pope Gregory VII during the Investiture Controversy. But actually there is no proof. The design is for sure inspired by the Holy Sepulchre church in Jerusalem. The church fell in disrepair and got deconsecrated in 1579. It was used as a storage room, dwellings and shops. About two centuries later, the church was completely forgotten but got rediscovered end of the 19th century. 1909 - 1911 the building got reconstructed. All external additions got removed, so the brickwork, typical for lombardian architecture of the 11th century, van be seen. As the roof was missing, designs from other rotundas in Northern Italy were studied - and so today the church looks perfect. The rotunda is "sunken" below the street level. A flight of stairs runs down to the entrance. The reason may be, that the church was built on the round foundations of an ancient Roman temple, dedicated to Venus.

Galliano - Basilica di San Vincenzo and Battistero…

01 Jul 2015 196
These two buildings, the basilica and the baptistery, here seen as a scale model, are placed in Galliano, just outside Cantù. The church was consecrated in 1007, but that marks the end of a rebuilding process, sponsored by Ariberto da Intimiano, who was Bishop of Milano from 1018 on - and a strong supporter of Emperor Henry II and his successor Conrad II, whom he crowned with the Iron Crown of Lombardy. It is believed that a small paleochristian church had existed here already in the 5th century. The basilica only has one aisle left, as having been abandoned for centuries, the church was deconsecrated sold and since then used as a farmhouse. In 1835 the right aisle collapsed. When the church got restored in the 1930s it was decided to to rebuild the aisle, but to close the right side by windows. Next to San Vincenco is the "Battistero di San Giovanni", erected the same time as the basilica.

Galliano - Basilica di San Vincenzo and Battistero…

01 Jul 2015 2 142
These two buildings, the basilica and the baptistery are in Galliano, just outside Cantù. The church was consecrated in 1007, but that marks the end of a rebuilding process, sponsored by Ariberto da Intimiano, who was Bishop of Milano from 1018 on - and a strong supporter of Emperor Henry II and his successor Conrad II, whom he crowned with the Iron Crown of Lombardy. It is believed that a small paleochristian church had existed on this hill already in the 5th century. The basilica only has one aisle left, as having been abandoned for centuries, the church was deconsecrated sold and since then used as a farmhouse. In 1835 the right aisle collapsed. When the church got restored in the 1930s it was decided to to rebuild the aisle, but to close the right side by windows. Next to San Vincenco is the "Battistero di San Giovanni", erected the same time as the basilica.

Galliano - Basilica di San Vincenzo

01 Jul 2015 2 139
The Basilica di San Vincenzo is in Galliano, just outside Cantù. The church was consecrated in 1007, but that marks the end of a rebuilding process. This was sponsored by Ariberto da Intimiano, who was Bishop of Milano from 1018 on - and a strong supporter of Emperor Henry II and his successor Conrad II, whom he crowned with the Iron Crown of Lombardy. It is believed that a small paleochristian church had existed on this hill already in the 5th century. The basilica only has one aisle left. Having been abandoned for centuries, the church was deconsecrated sold and since then used as a farmhouse. In 1835 the right aisle collapsed. When the church got restored in the 1930s it was decided to to rebuild the aisle, but to close the right side by windows. The basilica has a raised presbytery and a crypt below. Frescoes must have been on all walls once.

Galliano - Basilica di San Vincenzo

01 Jul 2015 2 635
The Basilica di San Vincenzo is in Galliano, just outside Cantù. The church was consecrated in 1007, but that marks the end of a rebuilding process. This was sponsored by Ariberto da Intimiano, who was Bishop of Milano from 1018 on - and a strong supporter of Emperor Henry II and his successor Conrad II, whom he crowned with the Iron Crown of Lombardy. It is believed that a small paleochristian church had existed on this hill already in the 5th century. The basilica only has one aisle left. Having been abandoned for centuries, the church was deconsecrated sold and since then used as a farmhouse. In 1835 the right aisle collapsed. When the church got restored in the 1930s it was decided to to rebuild the aisle, but to close the right side by windows. There are still many frescoes. Here is the frescoe of the apse.

Galliano - Basilica di San Vincenzo

01 Jul 2015 99
The Basilica di San Vincenzo is in Galliano, just outside Cantù. The church was consecrated in 1007, but that marks the end of a rebuilding process. This was sponsored by Ariberto da Intimiano, who was Bishop of Milano from 1018 on - and a strong supporter of Emperor Henry II and his successor Conrad II, whom he crowned with the Iron Crown of Lombardy. It is believed that a small paleochristian church had existed on this hill already in the 5th century. The basilica only has one aisle left. Having been abandoned for centuries, the church was deconsecrated sold and since then used as a farmhouse. In 1835 the right aisle collapsed. When the church got restored in the 1930s it was decided to to rebuild the aisle, but to close the right side by windows. There are still many frescoes.

Galliano - Basilica di San Vincenzo

01 Jul 2015 103
The Basilica di San Vincenzo is in Galliano, just outside Cantù. The church was consecrated in 1007, but that marks the end of a rebuilding process. This was sponsored by Ariberto da Intimiano, who was Bishop of Milano from 1018 on - and a strong supporter of Emperor Henry II and his successor Conrad II, whom he crowned with the Iron Crown of Lombardy. It is believed that a small paleochristian church had existed on this hill already in the 5th century. The basilica only has one aisle left. Having been abandoned for centuries, the church was deconsecrated sold and since then used as a farmhouse. In 1835 the right aisle collapsed. When the church got restored in the 1930s it was decided to to rebuild the aisle, but to close the right side by windows. There are still many frescoes.

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