Edwin Jones

Edwin Jones

Posted on 02/04/2013


Photo taken on January 31, 2013




Keywords

crater cone
star trails
polaris
astrophotography
volcanic
topaz
geology
milky way
astronomy
pic
trails
tonemapped
crater
volcanoe
night sky
dslra700
Masdache
north star
Caldera Colorada
the plough
sonya700
samyang
fisheye lens
celestial
Dark
Lanzarote
Photoshop
science fiction
high dynamic range
planet
landscape
darkness
path
spain
mars
blue
hdr
sky
red
space
night
nature
picture
purple
trail
wide angle
universe
tonemapping
volcano
photomatix
dslr
rocks
long exposure
fisheye
photography
galaxy
star


Authorizations, license

Visible by: Everyone
All rights reserved

874 visits

Red Planet Star Trails

Red Planet Star Trails
The Shot
This was taken from the side of the Caldera Colorada volcano, near Masdache, Lanzarote. There is a 45 minute walk round the base of the cone. One side is an unusual rich red, made up from cinder, rich in iron oxide.

There is a story associated with this image. I had finished one hour 44 minutes of 2 minute Star Trail exposures. I put the lens cap on and did a 2 minute dark exposure for noise reduction. Then I tripped and fell against the Tripod, grabbed it to try and save the camera but over it went with me on top of it. The amazing thing is there was not a scratch on Camera or lens and both work perfectly. I was also holding a smartphone using the torch app and that was undamaged. I had only a few minor cuts. You might say I had an argument with a Tripod and the Tripod won. I think the day was saved by the Camera falling on loose gravel rather than the many hard rocks around.

I had with me an HTC Android Smart Phone with the Google Sky App. This enabled me to locate the pole star while there was still light. The foreground comprises an HDR image taken while there was still light. With the Camera and Tripod locked in position the star trail images were taken later when the stars were out.

I used my Interval Timer and set the camera at ISO 200 and bulb and the timer at 2 minutes at f3.5. The lens was a Samyang 8mm fish eye. I set the timer to take images for 1 hour 44 minutes. I use software to stack the star trail images. There are a number of free programs available though I use www.startrails.de/html/software.html

In the end there was too much light in the first 10 minutes of exposures. I used 47 images or 1 hour and 34 minutes worth. There was still enough light to get a little blue in the sky which I wanted.

Note that here is distortion in the image due to the fisheye lens pointing up which curves the landscape up from the sides. This was exaggerated with the processing where I used the clone tool to add to the curve on the right to remove light from a town and also on the left to remove an over bright area in the sunset direction.

I took a dark frame. This has to be taken at the same time and place. The reason is that with long exposures the sensor will produce hot pixel noise which will be the same for the star trail images if taken for the same length of time and crucially at about the same temperature. The stacking software can then automatically subtract that noise from the final blended image.
I was on site for 3 and a half hours altogether for this picture. Not really a problem. I brought a picnic supper, read an eBook on my smartphone and looked at the beautiful night sky.

For further information on taking Star Trail images see the my Blog Entry for the earlier Star Trails image edwinjonesphotography.com/blog/2013/1/crater-floor-star-t...
Full details of the processing of this image together with before and after images are on my Blog see Edwin Jones Photography Blog
For Galleries, Prints and Licences see Edwin Jones Photography

Comments