pillarboxcottage

pillarboxcottage

Posted on 05/06/2013


Photo taken on May  6, 2013

1/200 f/5.6 80.0 mm ISO 200

Canon EOS 550D


See also...


Keywords

log
coins
tree trunk
Lake District
Little Langdale
Colwith Force
Cumbria coins Colwith Force


Authorizations, license

Visible by: Everyone
All rights reserved

99 visits

Numismatic Tree Trunk

Numismatic Tree Trunk
It appears that a new hobby of hammering coins into tree trunks is proliferating in the countryside. This example, on a felled tree trunk, is at Colwith Force in Little Langdale.

7 comments - The latest ones
Polyrus
Polyrus
Clearly you can bank on wood in the Lake District!
4 years ago.
Lorna Mchardy
Lorna Mchardy
Er... why?
4 years ago.
pillarboxcottage has replied to Lorna Mchardy
No idea! Except that there's a pub in the Lake District (Queen's Head, Troutbeck) with very old beams, a bar made from the top of a four poster bed, and huge old inglenook fireplace. Coins have been pressed into all the cracks in the wooden beams. Maybe people have taken the idea from that. According to the pub website, putting coins into wooden beams is a 17th century tradition. A superstition, maybe?
4 years ago.
Peggy C
Peggy C
- agree with Lorna Mchardy ... why ?
- seen in The Alphabet Site group
4 years ago.
lovestruck
lovestruck
Oh dear..how degrading and damaging to the tree..:~((

Seen in:
The Alphabet Site
4 years ago.
pillarboxcottage has replied to lovestruck
It was a fallen log, Gillie, not a living tree, but nevertheless I agree that this habit does rather demean what is, after all, a beautiful and valuable natural resource.
4 years ago.
Cathlon
Cathlon
There are many of these "money trees" around various locations in Britain and various theories around why and when this tradition began.
Here is a short but interesting article: weburbanist.com/2011/12/07/marvelous-mystery-of-britains-money-trees

Seen in "The Alphabet Site"
4 years ago.