Sonja

Sonja

Posted on 08/25/2016


Photo taken on April  3, 2016



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Isny
Baden-Wuertemberg
Untere Muehle


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Lower Mill, Isny / Untere Muehle, Isny

Lower Mill, Isny / Untere Muehle, Isny
A marker from 1545 in the wall. The content tells, asides from the obvious that spelling and gramar rules of the time where decidedly more fun than today, that the benedictine abbot Elias Frey did rebuild the whole mill from the ground. This can only mean that the first mill was destroyed completely, likely in the newlt protestant townspeoples fight against the monastry. In 1534 they shall have deliberately destroed a lot of stuff belonging to the benedictine canons. / Ein Gedenkstein von 1545 in der Mauer. Der Inhalt besagt, abgesehen davon das damals Rechschreibung und Gramatik Regeln amuesanter waren, das der Benediktiner Abt Elias Frey die Muehle von Grund wieder aufbaute. Das kann nur bedeuten das die urspruengliche Muehe wohll vollstaendig zerstoehrt wurde, vieleicht waerend den Kaempfen mit der noch nicht so lange protestantischen Buergerschaft der Stadt. 1534 hatten die ja offenar einigen Besitz der Chorherren mutwillig zerteppert.

Philippe_28, Valeriane ♫ ♫ ♫¨* have particularly liked this photo


9 comments - The latest ones
Jordi Bort
Jordi Bort
Beautiful detail.
I acknowledge your help, because I cannot imagine trying to translate it with modern automatic translators.
12 months ago.
Sonja has replied to Jordi Bort
There is actually nothing there written that can be understood unless you read it out loud and phonetic sort of correct as a german native speaker and adjust it. Even so it's right a catastrophe, mostly just emphasizing how the abbot is the master of those who put up the stone. This can of course be understod from the issues of the times. A free city full of legalized protestants trying to show they are their own masters and the surrounding rustics all dependant from the big catholic monastry and excluded by them.... alligance vows of the miller or some monastry estate for sure had more importance than just keeping some facts for later generations.

That is about a full english translation of it:
In the year of the lord 1545 the venerable master of us, the lord of us elias frey , the abbot of our local god's house, had errected the mill from the foundations so god may advantage him, amen.
12 months ago.
Neal Hanko
Neal Hanko
I'm glad you added
'understanding the issues of the times" Those were hard times for all the common people both catholic and protestant.
12 months ago.
Sonja has replied to Neal Hanko
Those not citizens of a free city got just told what they are to believe to abide by their masters rules and now and had to adjust their world view if the master converted or the land was sold to somebody of an other confession. To those in the free cities it was to go with the majority vote in such issues or pack it up and leave. The council men with voting rights in free cities often choose protestantism, it made for all sorts of trouble with clerical neighbors, but it was certainly better for business to keep their dependant workers from paying indulgences rather than real wares and having lots more of free saints holidays instead where they won't produce anything.
12 months ago.
Yves Courtemanche
Yves Courtemanche
Bien vu !
12 months ago.
Ron Hanko
Ron Hanko
Interesting plaque. With the city having turned Protestant in 1529, it's a bit surprising that the Benedictine monastery would have been allowed to continue and to rebuild the mill, given the religious climate of those times.
12 months ago.
Sonja has replied to Ron Hanko
Different story than with english reformation and counter-reformation alltogether.

This was so simple. Henry just started a counterchurch for his desired divorce, Mary his elder daughter tried to reinstall catholicism, then she died and Elisabeth the other daughter reinstalled Dad's religion. Some where killed for their believes or for their influence with the previous monarch, but in general people just converted as they where asked to do and that was it.

In Germany we had at that time a jumble of different saecular dukes and counts who where well able to differ and hold their own, not really any very mighty king having to tell them all which side owner of land had to choose. We also had the free imperial cities, affluent and walled with own soldiers for protection where the upper crust of citizens where already selfgoverning and freely choosing the alliances, paying taxes only to the mightiest protector. And there where lord provosts and arch abbots who of course had no choice but trust into the pope and the house of habsburg to defend their possessions. So it was like a patchwork carpet after the reformation. Today Isny is just a big town with the smal walled city and the monastry grounds making up a joined medieval centre with a lot of green parkland inbetween, and beyond this is a thick extra layer of business areas, modern residential, sportfields, campgrounds and hospitals. Back then this where just two neighboring and partially entangled entities, the town with the fields belonging directly to it, and the castle of the benedictines with their surrounding possessions, including different farms, mills and fisheries.
12 months ago.
Jeff Farley
Jeff Farley
Wonderful history and a super shot Sonja.
12 months ago.
Philippe_28
Philippe_28
Un intéressant témoignage du passé
12 months ago.