Frank Roolooth

Frank Roolooth

Posted on 06/17/2017


Photo taken on July  5, 2009


See also...


Authorizations, license

Visible by: Everyone
All rights reserved

36 visits

Another one boarded up

Another one boarded up
West Bridgewater Street Leigh

Jenny McIntyre has particularly liked this photo


10 comments - The latest ones
Isisbridge
Isisbridge
I like the cheerful red and gold sign that immediately tells you this is a PUB (or was a pub), unlike the boring new signs that minimalists seem to find so trendy these days.
4 months ago.
Frank Roolooth has replied to Isisbridge
Yes and I like the Greenalls brewery emblem at the top, it's got a touch of class to it unlike much of todays company logos taht just screech out and have to dominate our streets.
4 months ago.
Isisbridge has replied to Frank Roolooth
I don't know about screeching out: most of the modern pub signs are so bland you hardly notice them or don't realise they're pubs. It's these shiny new fascia strips on the shops that screech at you.
4 months ago.
Jenny McIntyre
Jenny McIntyre
What a shame - all these breweries are finding it cheaper selling on-line. All these pubs closing
4 months ago.
Frank Roolooth has replied to Jenny McIntyre
Pubs started going down hill when breweries started appointing managers rather than tenants, they have ruined the business but on the other hand they are making a lot of money from the new types of pub that double up as restaurants but they are no substitute for the old local where people would drop in for an hour and socialise and cathch up with local news.
4 months ago.
Isisbridge has replied to Frank Roolooth
One of the biggest causes of pubs closing down is the smoking ban. Why should you pay the earth for a drink and then have to sit outside in the cold if you want enjoy a fag with it? Much easier to sit at home with cheap booze from a shop. They ought to repeal the ban and allow pubs to have separate rooms for smokers if they wish.
4 months ago.
Frank Roolooth has replied to Isisbridge
When did the smoking ban come in? I have an idea that many pubs were already closing before the ban came in though it might well have accelerated the rate at which they were closing down. Pubs in out of the way places were already affected by a change in drink drive laws and the change in public attitude to having a few pints then getting behind the wheel to drive back home from the out of town pubs. Some crafty landlords provide a taxi service to their locals, it's that or go bust from the lack of regulars. Your idea sounds good in theory but the smoke wont stay in one room, it will travel between rooms unless you have airtight rooms. What would the implications be for employers making a person work in the bar where smoking is allowed, you can't force somebody to work in them, it all gets complicated. Apart from losing some customers in the very cold weather they have probably lost out on the money that they made from selling cigarettes in the pub which was probably a decent amount of money over the course of a year. I'm wondering if any of them are now selling these vapour cigarettes, then again I think there might be a ban on those inside some premises.The other thing that changed the pub culture was breweries designing pubs for the youth market, selling expensive drinks that the average local mature customer wont cough up for or wont enjoy the atmosphere of such pubs. Once the pub culture dies off it wont comer back, lots of people just drink indoors now, that can be nice but it's not quite the same.
4 months ago. Edited 4 months ago.
Isisbridge has replied to Frank Roolooth
July 2007. There are other factors of course, one being cheap drink in the supermarkets, but the smoking ban certainly had a big effect.

You wouldn't force people to work in smoking areas: you'd advertise for people who were smokers themselves and didn't mind. We'd be out of the EU and wouldn't have to comply with all their regulations. Plus we'd do a roaring trade from European tourists who'd choose British holidays to enjoy the relaxed smoking laws (as well as chips out of newspaper).

If you're worried about a tiny bit of smoke escaping from a room, how did you ever manage before 2007, when you told me you were a regular pub-goer?
4 months ago.
Frank Roolooth has replied to Isisbridge
My enjoyment of alcohol ruled my head most of the time but there were a few pubs that I avoided because they never had open windows and were packed with smokers, I'd feel ill and get streaming eyes, it wasn't at all pleasant, as for the other pubs I had no choice I had to breath in the smoke or forgo my social life of meeting friends in pubs. Non smokers were in a minority then but it's the other way round now with the smoking minority reducing in size each year (19.3% of British population by 2013), which means there's more room for them outside sheltering under something during inclement weather.

Is the smoking ban in pubs an EU regulation?
I think it was brought in by the Irish first followed by the Welsh and Scots then finally England. EU regulation would have to be implemented across the UK at the same time I'd have thought but it was decided by the local parliaments.

Do you really want the pubs full of French tourist smoking those funny smelling cigarettes that they enjoy so much? It’s better that they stay at home and have a revolution to remove Macron.

What would happen in a pub where all the bar staff right now are non smokers but the manager decided to make one part of the pub a smokers bar? He may not be able to afford to recruit an extra employee if he is already fully staffed, would he have to sack one of the non smoker employees? What happens when the smoking member of bar staff wants to take a break, one of the non smoker members surely couldn't be expected to go and fill in for 10 minutes? Lots of pubs have now removed walls and have just one large open bar, I think those ones would be reluctant to go to the expense of putting walls back in. The cost of their fire insurance would likely rise too.
Lastly, it’s not just smokers who have stopped going to pubs but non smokers too so the increase in custom might be smaller than you think if they were to do away with the smoke ban. Lets face it, in the next few decades smoking will go the way of cockerel fighting, it will be a thing that people will say did they really do that sort of thing in the olden days, how strange.
4 months ago. Edited 4 months ago.
Isisbridge has replied to Frank Roolooth
I didn't say that the smoking ban was an EU regulation. I meant other EU laws about workplace equality and discrimination and all that stuff, but I was saying it rather tongue in cheek.

I also said to allow pubs to have separate rooms for smokers IF THEY WISH, meaning if the pub owner wished to do this. So it would be up to him to decide if he could afford new staff or the replacement of walls.

If non-smokers have stopped going to pubs, that shows they were making a fuss about nothing when they campaigned to drive the smokers out. They probably miss the company of these more relaxed and easy-going people that they said were damaging their health.
4 months ago.