RobbeK

RobbeK

Posted on 07/13/2015


Photo taken on July 12, 2015


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N°3

N°3
Nikon V1 f 1.8 prime (EQ 50mm)
Loc is from 1922

Christine Boes-Schiller, Nora Caracci VERY BUSY, * Boes René *, SV1XV and 12 other people have particularly liked this photo


19 comments - The latest ones
Robert Warren
Robert Warren
MAGNIFIQUE!!! So good!
2 years ago.
RobbeK has replied to Robert Warren
Merci bien, Robert -- "jouets pour adultes" ;-)
2 years ago.
Marta Wojtkowska
Marta Wojtkowska
Well done!
2 years ago.
RobbeK has replied to Marta Wojtkowska
Thanks Marta
2 years ago.
Mikeinlagardette
Mikeinlagardette
Wonderful image, Rob, Bravo! The little loco is very charming, and the mono treatment is just right!

grtz Mike
2 years ago.
RobbeK
RobbeK
Thanks Mike,
Every Sunday (till October) under steam now - perfect occasion to use some different cameras/flavours on it.
2 years ago.
Tractacus
Tractacus
Excellent shot!
2 years ago.
RobbeK has replied to Tractacus
Thanks Tractacus !
2 years ago.
Martin Siegel
Martin Siegel
Looking good (photo and loco). The other 1 2 BTW
Grtjs
Martin
2 years ago. Edited 2 years ago.
RobbeK has replied to Martin Siegel
Thanks Martin , this was on the switch , the loco has to change position to drive back , it's a single non closed track A->B. Pushing the waggons would be too dangerous, the machinist could see nothing at all .. too many " unbewachten Bahnübergänge" (people are not used to these any more ) gtjs Rob
2 years ago.
Martin Siegel has replied to RobbeK
The tram I used to ride to school was the same. At the endpoints the front car with the driver drove on the second rail and then changed to the new front of the waggon.
Switches were fully manual, but no big deal as there was a concuctor in both the motor car and the waggon. Looked like this:
www.bahnbilder.de/1024/linz-esg-sl-b-tw-613996.jpg
On the 132 you can see the plug for the electrical connection between motor car and waggon (the upper round thing, lower on is the tail light). This was also unplugged and replugged with every switch.
2 years ago.
RobbeK has replied to Martin Siegel
Beautiful trams, Martin .. are these models still on the rails ? The "132" looks nice and vintage.
Here in Flanders, the most difficult tram line is the one that follows the coast , sometimes on a windy day there's so much sea sand near/around the rails they just stay home ;...
2 years ago.
Martin Siegel has replied to RobbeK
Hoi Rob,
these trams are not on the rails anymore. The last ones were put out of service in 1986. I think the tram company kept one or two which can be chartered for special runs and one is running on a museum track. The last ones ran only on one line which ran from the central train station to the station of the Pöstlingbergbahn. That line was just inner city and it did not matter they were rather slow.
The picture of the 132 (which is just the number of the waggon) must be pre 1974 when the changed the lines from letters to numbers.
B meant Bahnhof and was changed to 3 in 1974. Many people used to call it "B-Wagen" even a long time after that, especially when the old trams were still about. THe B was the only line then that ran to the central train station. Nowadays all trams pass the train station (underneath the ground) which is really very helpful. Back then you had to change trams for just a single stop which was annoying if you travelled with luggage. Climbing into these old trams was difficult if you were older with a child in the pram.
As long as they had conductors you had three crew on the old ones. 2 conductors selling tickets and one driver. Later when they changed to ticket vending machines only two. THe driver and one in the waggon who rang the bell at the stations to signal ready to the driver.

Although the old ones look more nostalgic the modern ones are much better if you need the tram as a means of daily transport, to be honest.
2 years ago. Edited 2 years ago.
RobbeK has replied to Martin Siegel
Thanks for all the info , Martin ....

"Although the old ones look more nostalgic the modern ones are much better if you need the tram as a means of daily transport, to be honest." ....

yep, often "love hurts" ... ;-)

wooden benches ??? ...

grtjs Rob
2 years ago.
Martin Siegel has replied to RobbeK
Yes, of course wooden benches. The benches ran in direction of travel so passengers sat facing the windows on the opposite site (or the backsides of the passengers standing in the aisle). There were a few grips hanging from some rails under ceiling on leather betls.
Too high for many school children. On the other hand kids were "persuaded" by the conductors to give seats to grown ups. So in case of an abrupt stop you had kides falling through the cars.
Doors were sliding and manual. You had to know the trick how to use the the handle. YOu had to pull it aginst the sliding direction of the door first and then in sliding direction. You always knew the tourist when they tried just pulling in one direction and the door did not open.
In summer they often drove with doors open. I don't think anyone ever fell out. A complete no-go nowadays.Just like busses with open platforms (Paris, England etc)
Those were the times..
2 years ago. Edited 2 years ago.
Bram van Broekhoven
Bram van Broekhoven
Beautiful capture, very nice B&W photo
2 years ago.
RobbeK has replied to Bram van Broekhoven
Dank je Bram
2 years ago.
Mitch Seaver
Mitch Seaver
Excellent!
2 years ago.
Nora Caracci VERY BUSY
Nora Caracci VERY BU…
lovely engine, excellent shot and edition !
2 years ago.