RobbeK

RobbeK

Posted on 04/22/2015


Photo taken on April 22, 2015


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2CV goes to war

2CV goes to war

Willi Morali, * Boes René * have particularly liked this photo


14 comments - The latest ones
Robert Warren
Robert Warren
Elle est très militairement coquette!
2 years ago.
Martin Siegel
Martin Siegel
2 horse cavalry?
Looks great!
2 years ago.
RobbeK
RobbeK
2CVdC chevaux de combat ;-) (good movie btw )
2 years ago.
Martin Siegel
Martin Siegel
In German we have Schlachtross - mostly used together with "alt" when describing a person. Meaning somebody who cannot be surprised much because he/she has seen almost everything and has fought all kinds of "battles".
so 2 Schlachtrösser - but honestly - not many people here know where 2CV comes from.
2 years ago. Edited 2 years ago.
RobbeK
RobbeK
"Ros" did not survive very well in flemish (usual is paard) , however when combined it is more the rule than the exception. .. a comb for the "manen" (don't know in english --german I think Mä(h?)ne ) -- een roskam , the verb : roskammen / a mill with real horse power : rosmolen ... etc ... same for Stute , no use any more , but then : stoeterij =- Gestut ? Gestüt ? ..
The older the words are , the more similarities I think ....
2 years ago.
Martin Siegel has replied to RobbeK
Ross is not much used in German anymore,as well. Survived only in fixed phrases like
Hoch zu Ross
Dampfross
Ross und Reiter
and maybe in names
like Rosskogel (a mountain)

As for the questionmarks: Mähne (manen) Gestüt (stoeterij)
But stute is used of course for the female Pferd
2 years ago. Edited 2 years ago.
RobbeK
RobbeK
Hoi Martin,
Those flemish words are prob. unknown to 90% of the population here .....
Yes, Stute , but that is "merrie" here -- a sudden switch to prob. Saxon and this while Stoeterij does exist and hengst is just der Hengst. Of course the Western knights did not use mares (unlike the Arabs ) , maybe related to all this ....
2 years ago.
Martin Siegel has replied to RobbeK
Hoi,
in German Mähre is nowadays used for an old, worn out horse, not matter if male or female.
We also have Schindmähre - a horse no longer able to work and which was normally given (sold) to the Schinder =Abdecker (vilder??)
2 years ago.
RobbeK
RobbeK
Hoi Martin,

Here we enter the esoteric nomenclature of the Schlaechterei ;-) (slachterij)
I only can speak how these words are used in Flanders :
- villen = removing the skin / vilder = skinner ?
- beenhouwer , that's a butcher but means something as bone chopper / cutter .. beenhouwerij (still very often used in Flanders) about the same as "slagerij" (person = slager not to be confused with slachter)
- but then you have the "spekslager" (spekslagerij) meaning a butcher doing porc.
- this is very local but here in Brabant if the butcher sells horse meat , it is still a "peerdentösser" (we discussed that word before I think).
So, if you want a p.e. rabbit fur - you bring it to the vilder and then the looier (Gerber for looier says the dict. here ).
One can say about a football team that most of them are "beenhouwers" ;-)
Schlagermuziek is not the same as Slagermuziek. (is it ?? ;-)
Schlachthof (as in the movie S fünf) is slachthuis

Animals died by reason of sickness/malady , these are going to the "Vilbeluik" - not sure what is recycled here (but when young the vilbeluik here was near Antwerp in Schoten -- and those people told me some strange stories -- but this is a long time ago and by reason of Anstand I will not rephrase them ;-)

I will not mention the meaning of the German Mähre to any feminist with Dutch background -- we say a "goed verstaander" only needs half a word ;-)
"een goed verstaander heeft maar een half woord nodig"

grtjs
2 years ago. Edited 2 years ago.
Martin Siegel has replied to RobbeK
Yes, the Abdecker was the last station. He picked up the (dead) horse, skinned it, took it apart and sold everything. Skin to the Gerber, bones to the Seifensieder (soap maker) and the rotten flesh to the Salpetersieder.
In Austria we say Fleichhauer or Fleischhacker for butcher although the German Metzger bekcomes used more.
A Pferdefleischhauer is often called Pepihacker here in Austria. The names is said to come from the fact that the tails and Mähnen were not only used for mattrasses (Rosshaarmatratze) but also for making cheapish wigs and hairpieces. Those commonly called Pepi in Austria.

Here animals that die of sickness/old age and pets are collected her by the Tierkörperverwertung. There was one near the motorway and one saw their tucks often. (In case of mist/fog you smelled them before you saw them).

Anyway, coming back to Mähre: The word comes from Arabic and originally meant a noble Schlachtross (not for the Pepihacker but for the battle).
The reason for it being used for worn out horses is that mares were not as strong and aged earlier because of having foals (Fohlen in German)

Grtjs
Martin
2 years ago.
RobbeK
RobbeK
Thanks for this info !
2 years ago.
Martin Siegel has replied to RobbeK
You're welcome, Rob.
I'm not sure if I am boringly lengthy sometimes ;-)
2 years ago.
RobbeK
RobbeK
Not all ;-) -- immer lehrreich !
2 years ago.
Martin Siegel has replied to RobbeK
OK, lehrreich is much better than oberlehrerhaft ;-)
2 years ago.