Nederland - Apeldoorn, Paleis Het Loo

Nederland: historische bouwwerken


Pictures of Dutch historical and architectural structures. Including castles, churches, city halls, etc.

Nederland - Havelte, dolmen

03 Sep 2011 39 26 1510
Hunebed 'D54' is located at the foot of the Havelterberg.

Nederland - Midlaren, hunebed D3 en D4

09 Mar 2020 98 84 471
Hunebedden (megalithic tombs) are the oldest monuments in the Netherlands. They were built more than 5.000 years ago in the last phase of the Stone Age by people of the Funnel Beaker Culture, who buried their dead in these hunebedden . The stones of which the dolmens are built are originating from Scandinavia. They were carried south by the advancing land ice during an ice age. When the ice melted at the end of the ice age, the stones that were carried along were left behind. Most of these tombs in the province of Drenthe lie in fields or woods. Hunebed D4 is an exception, as it lies next to a wall of a small 19th century farmhouse and has survived nearly intact. Its ‘twin’ D3 lies close by and was for a long time partly covered by a mound of sand that was part of the original burial monument. The remains of that mound were dug away in 1870. Although almost complete, with all of the lintels and all but two of the uprights being present, these two tombs have never been restored. Only the cracks in the lintels have been filled with cement. They make a pretty picture, not least because of the wildly shaped branches of the old oak trees above the stones. Despite standing by the side of the road, the hunebedden are not immediately visible. We had to follow the signs to a narrow path that squeezes between two small dilapidated farmhouses and only then we found the large green lichen-covered lumps of stone, standing ‘head to tail’.

Nederland - Loon, hunebed D15

08 Mar 2020 77 67 418
Hunebedden (megalithic tombs) are the oldest monuments in the Netherlands. They were built more than 5.000 years ago in the last phase of the Stone Age by people of the Funnel Beaker Culture, who buried their dead in these hunebedden . The stones of which the dolmens are built are originating from Scandinavia. They were carried south by the advancing land ice during an ice age. When the ice melted at the end of the ice age, the stones that were carried along were left behind. Hunebed D15 is located nearby the village of Loon. It has all it takes to be a complete hunebed . Five pairs of upright stones support five capstones and together they form a chamber. The chamber is closed off by two more large stones, one at either end. Halfway along one of the long sides is the entrance. Two pairs of portal stones flank a short passage providing access to the tomb. The passage was originally covered with two capstones, one of which has survived. The portal stones are connected to a ring a stones, known as “kerb”. Those stones surrounding the hunebed once marked the periphery of a barrow that covered the tomb. There are still 18 of the 23 still remaining, which is unusual because in the past these stones were usually the first to be stolen. The barrow was dug away shortly after 1870, with intention to restore the honeyed to its original state. In those days it was assumes that the mound of earth did not form part of the tomb. The hunebedden in the province of Drenthe all have the same basic design. Nowadays most of them don’t have portal stones of a kerb. Hunebed D15 is one of the few including all the possible elements.

Nederland - Dwingeloo, Sint Nicolaaskerk

17 Apr 2018 81 76 879
The Dutch Reformed Church Sint Nicolaaskerk is located in the centre of the village of Dwingeloo. The brick, gothic, hall church was built around the year of 1410 on the site of an older church from the 12th century with a free standing tower. The church is very similar to other Gothic village churches in the province of Drenthe, consisting of a one-aisled nave with a narrower choir and a tower decorated with niches. The Sint Nicolaaskerk has a remarkable onion-shaped tower, which gives the church its nickname De Siepel (meaning ‘onion’ in the local dialect). After a huge fire in 1923 the original spire was replaced by a slightly less tender copy. It is still the beacon of Dwingeloo and is visible from a great distance.

Nederland - Dwingeloo, Havezate Oldengaerde

18 Apr 2018 91 91 1203
Oldengaerde is a so called havezate - manor or fortified house - and the original building dates back to 1420. It was built by Reynolt van Echten and inhabited by the Van Echten family till 1660. That year it was sold to its son in law Cornelis van Dongen. In 1717 his son completely renovated Oldengaerde; the front became an extra floor and the current remarkable classicist façade. The garden was also constructed in a classicist French garden style. In 1808 ‘Havezate Oldengaerde’ was purchased by Aalt Willem van Holthe; the house kept in the possession of this family for many years. During the 19th century new renovations took place, the major one was the lowering of the roof timber and the replacement of the gable by a pediment. The owners of Oldengaerde - four daughters of Mrs. Willinge-Westra van Holthe - decided at the end of 2013 to hand over the management of the ‘havezate’ to ‘Het Drentse Landschap’, a provincial foundation for preservation of nature and cultural heritage.

Nederland - Dwingeloo, Havezate Oldengaerde

10 Feb 2014 40 38 1964
Oldengaerde is a so called ‘havezate’ - manor or fortified house - and the original building dates back to 1420. It was built by Reynolt of Echten and inhabited by the Van Echten family till 1660. That year it was sold to its son in law Cornelis van Dongen. In 1717 his son completely renovated Oldengaerde; the front became an extra floor and the current remarkable classicist façade. The garden was also constructed in a classicist French garden style. In 1808 Havezate Oldengaerde was purchased by Aalt Willem van Holthe,; the house kept in the possession of this family for many years. During the 19th century new renovations took place, the major one was the lowering of the roof timber and the replacement of the gable by a pediment. The owners of Oldengaerde - four daughters of Mrs. Willinge-Westra van Holthe - decided at the end of 2013 to hand over the management of the ‘havezate’ to ‘Het Drentse Landschap’, a provincial foundation for preservation of nature and cultural heritage.

Nederland - Paterswolde, Huis Vennebroek

01 Jun 2020 87 92 401
Not much is known about the origins of Huis Vennebroek (Manor Vennebroek). From 1689 to 1747 the house had the so-called right of havezate (manor or fortified house). In 1768 the manor was mentioned in an advertisement in a local newspaper. In 1848, Jonkheer Hooft van Iddekinge rebuilt the house extensively, retaining a large part of the basement and the ground floor. In 1912 the estate was bought by P.A. Camphuis, a merchant from Groningen. He was also the owner of the adjacent Friesche Veen estate; Vennebroek and Friesche Veen have formed a unit ever since. Camphuis restored the house, but did not stay there long. The manor remained in the family for a long time; the wife of his eldest son lived there until her death in 1994. Around 1985 the house and the estates became the property of Natuurmonumenten (Society for preservation of nature monuments in the Netherlands). Since 2014 the house has been privately owned and inhabited again. Huis Vennebroek is surrounded by a horseshoe-shaped moat. The estate has many old beeches and chestnuts; the oldest is more than 300 years. In the autumn the estate is known for its many species of mushrooms.

Nederland - Rolde, Jacobuskerk

08 Feb 2014 37 32 1436
Rolde, once the capital of the area known as the Rolderdingspel, had already a wooden church around the year of 900. Around 1200 the first stone church was built: a large Romanesque church with three naves. Most probably the construction of the present Jacobuskerk (James Church) began in the early 15th century and was inaugurated late 1427 or early 1428 and put into use as a roman catholic church. It became a protestant church after the reformation of 1598 (nowadays both protestants and catholics are using the old building for their services). The church has a remarkable high tower (52 meters), which is visible from far away and served in the past as a beacon for travelers to and from the city of Groningen. During the most recent restoration (1961 – ’64), the church was thoroughly reconstructed to its original form and changes from previous renovations were undone. The Jacobuskerk is beautifully located in the centre of Rolde, next to an old cemetery and two interesting dolmen. The church is open for visitors daily during summer season.

Nederland - De Wijk, Huize Dickninge

18 Apr 2018 79 86 864
Huize Dickninge (Manor Dickninge) is located in a beautiful region around De Wijk with lots of manors and estates. Its history is dating back to the late Middle Ages; in the year of 1325 the Benedictine monastery ‘Soetendale’ moved from Ruinen to Dickninge. It was inhabited by monks and nuns till 1652. In 1796 the buildings were bought by Reint Hendrik de Vos van Steenwijk. After a demolition Manor Dickninge was rebuild in 1913 in an Empire-style. The garden is dating back to 1820.and is famous for the - quite rare - blooming Hollowroot in spring (see: www.ipernity.com/doc/294067/41492970/in/album/537905) .

Nederland - De Wijk, Huize Dickninge

17 Dec 2015 69 71 1710
Huize Dickninge (Manor Dickninge) is located in a beautiful region around De Wijk with lots of manors and estates. Its history is dating back to the late Middle Ages; in the year of 1325 the Benedictine monastery ‘Soetendale’ moved from Ruinen to Dickninge. It was inhabited by monks and nuns till 1652. In 1796 the buildings were bought by Reint Hendrik de Vos van Steenwijk. After a demolition Manor Dickninge was rebuild in 1813 in an Empire-style. The garden is dating back to 1820 and is famous for the - quite rare in the Netherlands - blooming Hollowroot in spring: www.ipernity.com/doc/294067/41492970

Nederland - Landgoed Dickninge, tolhuis

18 Apr 2018 95 91 933
Dickninge estate - about 75 hectares in size - consists next to the monumental Dickninge Manor of a farmhouse and restored gardener's house. On the edge of the cultivated area and beautiful forests, near the river De Reest is still a rural cottage, beautifully situated in the green. The original destination of the building with its fence in front is quickly clear. The toll at the border of Dickninge is already very old. For the owners of Huize Dickninge it was a welcome source of income. The road between Staphorst and De Wijk crossed for many years the estate. In the second half of the 19th century the road over Dickninge lost its significance as a direct connection. In February 1948, official tolls in Drenthe were abolished, but the private toll in Dickninge remained. The last toll collector left in 1962. After that the house was refurbished and inhabited for many years by the latest owner of Huize Dickninge, Mrs. Roëll.

Nederland - Veenhuizen

17 Apr 2018 92 110 1139
In 1818 things were not going very well in the Kingdom of the Netherlands, consisting of the current countries Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg. The kingdom had fought and lost several wars and trade was not at the levels it used to be. There was widespread poverty, particulary in the cities. Government and churches failed to solve the problems, so a group of people from more prosperous circles, under the leadership of a former army officer, set up an organisation in order to combat poverty: De Maatschappij van Weldadigheid (the Society of Benevolence. Orphans, handicapped people, beggars, prostitutes, vagrants and others living in poverty did get a new change by working in a reform housing colony. The first one Frederiksoord was built in 1818. Families were given homes and a piece of land. Men grew their own crops on the land and women spinned yarn. Everything they received was in the form of a loan, which they repaid through work. After a couple of ‘free’ colonies for the poor, the Society also set up unfree colonies for beggars, vagrants and orphans who did not wish to move to the countryside of their own free will. The residents were referred to as ‘patients’, but as a matter of fact they were prisoners.. Veenhuizen - built in 1823 - was the second ‘unfree’ settlement in the Netherlands. The settlement grew and grew and became a large institution. It was run differently and the the ‘patients’ were constantly monitored by guards. The settlement was built on reclaimed peatland. ‘Patients’ were on a tightly controlled daily schedule and work was a form of therapy. Compulsory attendance at a place of worship was also mandatory, no matter where - a catholic or protestant church or a synagoge. In the 20th century the unfree colony inVeenhuizen was converted into an official prison. The colony still serves as a penal establishment with two prisons. One of the former buildings (main picture and PiP’s) nowadays houses the National Prison Museum. The museum also shows what life in the colony of Veenhuizen was like.

Nederland - Lemmer, Woudagemaal

10 Sep 2010 69 74 554
The Ir. D.F. Woudagemaal is the largest, still functioning steam pumping station in the world. The pumping station was opened in 1920 by Queen Wilhelmina. Its job was pumping excess water from the provice of Friesland into the Zuiderzee (later IJsselmeer ). In 1966 the pumping station received reinforcement of the electric Hoogland gemaal in Stavoren. During the winters of the 19th and the first half of the 20th century, large parts of Friesland were flooded. To counter this flooding, it was decided to build a steam pumping station at Lemmer in 1913. The pumping station is named after Ir. Dirk Frederik Wouda, who served as Chief Engineer at the time of the Provincial Public Works and was responsible for the style and performance of the building. In the huge machine hall there are four steam engines with four powerful flywheels, which are still operational. In 1967, after running on coal for 47 years, the boilers were converted to run on heavy fuel oil.The steam engines and flywheels drive eight centrifugal pumps that move about 6 million m³ of water per day. The Woudagemaal is brought under steam at least twice a year by its owner Wetterskip Fryslân . The largest steam pumping station in the world still plays a crucial role in the Frisian water authority to this day. When there is a lot of rain or during a persistent storm, the Woudagemaal can be used to help keep the Frisian water at the same level. The remarkable brick building - inspired by the Amsterdam School style - features clean lines and an austere appearance and has characteristics of Berlage's rationalism, such as the steel rafters, the use of stone, oak, sophisticated colours and decorative edges. Since 1998, the Woudagemaal has been one of the ten UNESCO World Heritage sites in the Netherlands. Nowadays it is open for visitors.

Nederland - Bolsward, city hall

06 Sep 2010 18 5 1182
City hall of Bolsward, built between 1614 and 1617 by Bolsward craftsmen.

Nederland - Kerk van Ferwoude

09 Sep 2010 32 18 1383
The church of Ferwoude (Ferwâlde) has been plastered in remarkable bright colours. The oldest parts date back from the second half of the 13th century. Reports tell that the church and tower were demolished in 1762 to sell the tuff stones to the cement industry in Makkum. The present church was built in 1767.

Nederland - Franeker, Martinikerk

07 Sep 2010 24 12 1498
Martinikerk (St. Martin's Church), dating back to 1421, has an impressive nave with a wooden vault and 30 slender columns. Many of these columns do have splendid frescoes of saints (see 'note')

Nederland - Heerenveen, Crackstate

24 Jun 2009 30 30 1756
Most probably the first ‘state’ was built in the year of 1608 by a member of the Crack-family. On the same spot the present stately house was built in 1648 by Johannes Sytzes Crack, ‘grietman (a kind of mayor) of Aengwirden’. Architect was Willem de Keyser, son of the famous Dutch architect Hendrick de Keyser. The face of the building therefore has some similarity with the houses along the canals of Amsterdam. The building is surrounded by a moat. The bridge over the water dates - as specified on a bricked stone - from 1775. The port for the bridge comes away from the Frisian village of Horn and mentions the year 1819. Up to 1833 the house was the residence of the Crack family, when it became a public building, used as a court-house. From 1952 Crackstate is part of the town hall of the municipality of Heerenveen. It is located nearby the town centre.

Nederland - Jelsum, Dekema State

07 Sep 2010 26 17 1615
Dekema State: a country estate in the 14th century originally built as a fortified dwelling. Rebuilt many times till its last restoration in 2004.

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