1/800 f/4.0 108.0 mm ISO 100

Panasonic DMC-FZ200

EXIF - See more details

See also...


Keywords

macro
annkelliott
Anne Elliott
© All Rights Reserved
burnt orange
southern Alberta
Orange False Dandelion
Agoseris aurantiaca
near Canada-US border
Akamina Parkway
Orange-flowered False Dandelion
FZ200#4
© Anne Elliott 2017
7 July 2017
FZ200
Waterton Lakes National Park
orange
nature
flora
flower
plant
close-up
outdoor
summer
native
wildflower
Canada
Asteraceae
Alberta
on way to Cameron Lake


Authorizations, license

Visible by: Everyone
All rights reserved

94 visits

Orange False Dandelion / Agoseris aurantiaca

Orange False Dandelion / Agoseris aurantiaca
I have only ever seen this wildflower maybe three or four times before, so I was happy to see it growing among tall Bear Grass, along the edge of the road leading up to Cameron Lake, Waterton Lakes National Park. This wildflower, Agoseris aurantiaca, is native and grows on grassland slopes, open woods and prairie. A member of the Aster family, Asteraceae. Flower heads are 2-3 cm across, with no disc flowers, but many ray florets. Blooms June-August.

plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=AGAU2

On 9 July 2017, I arrived back home from a wonderful three-day trip to Waterton Lakes National Park. I had just been on a one-day bus trip to this beautiful park on 24 June 2017, so felt very lucky to be returning for a longer stay so soon. I travelled there and back with friend, Darlene, who had very kindly offered to take me, and we had a fun time, seeing so many interesting things. Thank you SO much, Darlene - I can't begin to tell you how much I appreciated being able to go on this trip with you!

Friend Darlene and I arrived in Waterton (from Calgary) around 1:00 pm, stopped and had lunch and then went to see the Cameron Falls on the edge of town. The cold spray felt so good on such a hot day (32C) Afterwards, we drove up the Akamina Parkway, to Cameron Lake, stopping along the road to photograph a few of the thousands of beautiful Bear Grass flowers. Many were growing along the edge of the road, but in places, you could look through the forest and see many more. We also stopped to look at the Penstemon plants, and I was also delighted to see this small Orange False Dandelion.

A very quick stop at Cameron Lake itself and then we were on our way back down the Akamina Parkway so that we could go up the Red Rock Canyon Parkway, to visit the beautiful canyon. On the way there, we made a quick stop to check for a Lazuli Bunting. We were in luck, though I could only get very distant shots of this beautiful little bird.

By this time, we needed to get to the Canyon Youth Camp, where we would be staying two nights. Supper was being served at 6:00 pm, but we could check in any time after 5:00 pm. After supper, most people went on a hike up to Crandell Lake, but I decided not to go, as I remembered what the trail was like. I did follow everyone for just a very short way but knew that I was not going to do the rest of the hike. Instead, I walked around the camp, finding a few flowers to photograph, and then I bumped into the camp manager and we got talking. I mentioned one of my favourite plants, Pinedrops, that I had seen last year on one of the paths that led out of the camp. The manager said he had already checked, but had only found last year's dead stems. He took me back to the location - and I spotted several new stems partly hidden in the long grasses. He was so happy to see that this plant was doing well, after all. He also took me on a short walk through the edge of the forest and down to the river. About 20 minutes after getting back to the camp buildings, a Black Bear wandered along the edge of the same trees that we had walked through to get to the river! Could only get a really poor photo that I probably won't post - or maybe I will, just for my own records. Shortly after this sighting, everyone else arrived back at the camp, and it was time to get to bed before all the lights were turned off.

Comments

Sign-in to write a comment.